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View Full Version : 1933 Studebaker Commander for auction on Ebay (Studebaker National Museum car)



Studebaker Wheel
11-06-2015, 04:13 PM
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Studebaker-Commander-/231744106265

This is an outstanding car (and quite scarce). It was shown at the SDC Intl in South Bend in 2012.

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sweetolbob
11-06-2015, 04:59 PM
As a Certified Pre-Owned car I would believe you could take it to any Studebaker Dealer for warranty work. Seriously, a really pretty car. :) Bob

stude dude
11-06-2015, 05:18 PM
Does the museum have another model to represent this important year?

Chris.

jclary
11-06-2015, 05:56 PM
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Studebaker-Commander-/231744106265

This is an outstanding car (and quite scarce). It was shown at the SDC Intl in South Bend in 2012.

49221

You are certainly right about this being an "outstanding" car.:!: It was on the South Bend 2012 show field, standing near this car, where we had a brief conversation. Somewhere I have a pic of my wife standing next to this car.:) Even as a child, I've wanted a car like this. I'll be 71 next Thursday, and I see this dream, (as a reality), slipping away. The closest I ever came was my hotrod, model A, when I was 19. Absolutely no comparison.

I've been outside for most of the day. When I came in and saw this thread, I pulled up the listing and showed it to my wife. Hoping she would recall admiring the car at the 2012 meet, I pointed it out to her. Gee, with hardly a glance, her comment was, "You ready for supper?":(

Oh well...I dream alone:QQ:.

Heck, I believe I'd walk the 635 miles to South Bend to pick up this car. Guess I'll have to start playing the lottery.;)

TWChamp
11-06-2015, 08:20 PM
I'd also love to own that car, but it will only happen in my dreams. Seems too nice a car for the museum to be parting with.

alaipairod
11-06-2015, 08:29 PM
I know automotive museums have to make enough money to cover their overhead.
Sometimes a "Beancounter" is employed to keep that overhead covered.
Then the sad fact that the easiest way to cover that "overhead" is to sell off their "EXCESS" inventory of cars theat were "DONATED" to that museum under the promise that they would be there "forever"
Check out what the Peterson Museum in Los Angeles CA is doing to their donated cars to finance their fancy remodel.
..........As for me, I will sell my Studebakers, before a museum gets them.............

Studebaker Wheel
11-06-2015, 08:39 PM
I know automotive museums have to make enough money to cover their overhead.
Sometimes a "Beancounter" is employed to keep that overhead covered.
Then the sad fact that the easiest way to cover that "overhead" is to sell off their "EXCESS" inventory of cars theat were "DONATED" to that museum under the promise that they would be there "forever"
Check out what the Peterson Museum in Los Angeles CA is doing to their donated cars to finance their fancy remodel.
..........As for me, I will sell my Studebakers, before a museum gets them.............

Just a note of correction. No accredited museum makes "the promise that they would be there forever." This particular car was donated from an estate w/o any prior communication from the donor to the museum.

jclary
11-06-2015, 09:03 PM
I'd also love to own that car, but it will only happen in my dreams. Seems too nice a car for the museum to be parting with.


I know automotive museums have to make enough money to cover their overhead.
Sometimes a "Beancounter" is employed to keep that overhead covered.
Then the sad fact that the easiest way to cover that "overhead" is to sell off their "EXCESS" inventory of cars theat were "DONATED" to that museum under the promise that they would be there "forever"
Check out what the Peterson Museum in Los Angeles CA is doing to their donated cars to finance their fancy remodel.
..........As for me, I will sell my Studebakers, before a museum gets them.............

Well...I'm no museum curator expert, but I've been to lots of collections, public and private. Depending on funding, and facilities, all have limitations. There's always a saturation point to which they can become overextended. What good is a car in a museum if it sits neglected. I've seen huge multi-million dollar homes fall in to disrepair from being dormant, vacant, and neglected. Few museums make "forever" promises on any donated item unless it occupies some very special provenance.

Probably, one of the most expensive "Junk yards" in the world is owned by all of us who pay taxes. Since it's not "their" money...in numerous warehouses in "who knows where"...it is otherwise known as "The Smithsonian." Anyone wanting the SNM to keep all donated stuff, step up, donate buildings, real estate, and personnel to wash, wax, dust, and maintain. For me, I'll visit when I can, buy a ticket, occasional store item, and enjoy the experience.

As for this car, the next owner might just install the missing radiator mascot, correct the windshield frame plating issues, install pedal pads, etc. In fact, after improving the car, enjoying it for a few years, he might even re-donate it to the museum in better condition than ever.:)

alaipairod
11-06-2015, 09:19 PM
Just a note of correction. No accredited museum makes "the promise that they would be there forever." This particular car was donated from an estate w/o any prior communication from the donor to the museum.

The sad part of the above comment is that when a car collector passes, the estate inheritors that have no use for his collection donates it to a museum, believing that it would be there "forever".
Museum "curators" rarely inform the estates that is not true............

Studebaker Wheel
11-06-2015, 09:40 PM
The sad part of the above comment is that when a car collector passes, the estate inheritors that have no use for his collection donates it to a museum, believing that it would be there "forever".
Museum "curators" rarely inform the estates that is not true............

Believe you may be making a generalization. The Studebaker museum makes it very clear that donations may be sold. Selling a car means that it most likely duplicates a similar car already in the collection (in this case a '33 President Speedway model). The funds generated from a sale goes towards acquiring other vehicles that the museum does not have (and probably could not afford had the funds from sales not been available). The donation then is quite important in generating funds to acquire desirable vehicles not in the collection.

Stu Chapman
11-06-2015, 11:05 PM
Believe you may be making a generalization. The Studebaker museum makes it very clear that donations may be sold. Selling a car means that it most likely duplicates a similar car already in the collection (in this case a '33 President Speedway model). The funds generated from a sale goes towards acquiring other vehicles that the museum does not have (and probably could not afford had the funds from sales not been available). The donation then is quite important in generating funds to acquire desirable vehicles not in the collection.

Richard is quite correct. Since both of us have been on the Studebaker National Museum Board since its inception, now as Honorary Life Trustees, we can assure everyone that there is nothing ever hidden from any donor. The Museum accepts donor vehicles in two ways, restricted and unrestricted, and everyone donating a vehicle is in full agreement with the details. I regret that this thread has turned into a critique that is unfounded.

Stu Chapman

jclary
11-07-2015, 09:00 AM
I regret that this thread has turned into a critique that is unfounded.

Stu Chapman

Let's look "positive" regarding the direction of this thread. Think of it as an opportunity to EDUCATE.:!:

I'd be willing to bet that most of us have that special drawer where we keep "special" things. Things that have special value to us alone, but to others it is the "junk" drawer. To folks with little knowledge of the items in the drawer, it is easy to either dismiss their value or overestimate them. I have several curio cabinets in my home. I have even more "stuff" out of sight. The things displayed are highly valued. Sometimes, I have to decide to move some things out. You just can't keep everything.

Just as folks show up at Studebaker meets and gripe about being charged to "register." Innocently ignorant of the behind the scenes effort and costs associated with staging the events. It seems as though it is human nature to make negative assumptions.:( It's the "easy" route. You folks who have served in official capacities, have gained insight that mere observers will never know. It's like being at a football game. It is the guys on the field taking the hits and playing the game. Everybody on the bench, sidelines, and in the stands...are expressing "opinions.":rolleyes:

So...thanks, Stu, Richard, and all others who are taking the hits.:!::cheers::)

Chris_Dresbach
11-07-2015, 02:58 PM
I agree that the museum has to occasionally sell off cars to make room for new ones; after all the building they have isn't a parking garage with unlimited space and it is nice to occasionally see new cars get put on display. THAT BEING SAID they need to research their own stuff before they sell it. I recall that they had Harold Churchill's personal Wagonaire. It was either a '65 or '66, obviously Canadian built. It was donated by Churchill's daughter. The car itself was not perfect, but was very much so a survivor that was historically significant because 1 it belonged to a past Studebaker president and 2 just for the fact that it was a Wagonaire. The museum sold it because it was not a restored show car and they claimed they already had a Wagonaire. I can assure all of you here that the museum does not have a Wagonaire let along one on display. They have the Skyview prototype which is similar, but it's an experimental vehicle that is drastically different from a Wagonaire. You would think that the museum staff would notice the obvious difference between the two. (And for the record the placard by the Skyview in the basement at the museum calls it a '65 Wagonaire; so evidently they can't tell the difference.)

Another car they don't have on display is a GT Hawk. They had one in the basement for about a month but immediately sold it. The Wagonaire incident made me loose some confidence in the museum. That's a car that should not have been sold for more than one reason. And for the record before the current museum got built there were plans on the table to build a considerably larger museum building in the parking lot of the old museum. There was also land considered off the bypass farther out in the county. Either location would have had a larger capacity than the current building. The short reason why it never happened is the powers that be at the time wanted the new museum to be close to the Center for History and the site on Chapin street was street was cheap.

Hate me for saying it, but it happened.

Hallabutt
11-07-2015, 04:19 PM
Dick,

Maybe you can tell us who chooses which cars are to stay and which are to be sold. Maybe as important, which cars are considered worthy of being displayed while others continue to languish in the basement. There was no duplicate car to the 1933 President Speedway on display until it became a prominent feature of the collection. Yet that same car had remained in the corner of the basement for years without any indication to the previous owner that it would ever be displayed!

Dick Steinkamp
11-07-2015, 07:35 PM
Unbelievable critique of the museum here and the extraordinary job to they do to help keep a long gone and relatively unpopular auto make alive for those (few) of us who appreciate Studebakers.

I can only surmise that some people are happiest when they are unhappy...and go to great lengths to find something to be unhappy about.

Chris_Dresbach
11-10-2015, 09:56 PM
If they sell donated vehicles, Dibs on a certain blue '41 in the basement.

56H-Y6
11-11-2015, 07:01 AM
Hi

Every museum faces the dilemma of what to retain permanently, what to sell off as duplicate in order to raise needed funding. Any family who wishes to see grandpa's beloved 1950 Belch-Fire given to a museum to preserve in perpetuity better be prepared to also fund its maintenance and support the museum's general operating expenses.

For the models mentioned that are widely held by SDC members, better the museum should display those on a rotating loan basis. Not only does that keep the variety of cars on display fresh, a further inducement to visit more often, it makes cars that are usually tucked away from public view more readily available for enjoyment than the occasional show. On a practical basis, its free storage for the owner in an ideal environment, even an ego boost for the owner knowing his car is prefect enough to be displayed as representative of this type.

Steve

alaipairod
11-11-2015, 09:52 AM
Hi

Every museum faces the dilemma of what to retain permanently, what to sell off as duplicate in order to raise needed funding. Any family who wishes to see grandpa's beloved 1950 Belch-Fire given to a museum to preserve in perpetuity better be prepared to also fund its maintenance and support the museum's general operating expenses.

For the models mentioned that are widely held by SDC members, better the museum should display those on a rotating loan basis. Not only does that keep the variety of cars on display fresh, a further inducement to visit more often, it makes cars that are usually tucked away from public view more readily available for enjoyment than the occasional show. On a practical basis, its free storage for the owner in an ideal environment, even an ego boost for the owner knowing his car is prefect enough to be displayed as representative of this type.

Steve

Murphey's Auto Museum in Oxnard CA has a plan that, for a monthly fee, they will show and maintain your classic car.
Should you choose to put it up for sale they will assist. This be one way to cover overhead............

Chris_Dresbach
11-12-2015, 03:25 PM
The problem with running the Studebaker National Museum like Murphey's Auto Museum in CA is that the SNM is funded in part by the City of South Bend whereas something like Murphey's is a private business. In other words, the SNM and SDC are separate entities and there is no such thing as a Studebaker Drivers Club National Museum.

If anybody here doesn't like that, then by all means the Mayors number is 574-233-0311, his name is Pete Buttigeig.

Furthermore I'd like to know how much overhead the museum actually has and where the money from car sales actually goes. Being part of the City of South Bend the museum should be given a budget. I would assume that their budget would cover payroll for the few employees they have, heating and air, and general maintenance which can't be much seeing as the building is only 10 years old.
So every time they sell a car where is that money going? Further, how much money is in the museum restoration fund and has that changed since the completion of the last car restored? When was the last time the museum was financially audited?

AND LASTLY, nobody here as been able to answer the question of who decided what cars the museum sells and what criteria is determined to sell any given car.

Commander Eddie
11-12-2015, 04:42 PM
Chris,
Is the museum non-profit?
If so, I believe non-profits are supposed to be audited annually. That would answer some or all of your questions.

Studebaker Wheel
11-12-2015, 06:01 PM
There is a long answer and a short answer to your questions. I will provide the short answer and if after reading it you want the long answer I can endeavor to provide that.

The museum has 27 members on its board. Most all are business and professional people from the South Bend area (includes the SDC president). There are also a few life trustees like myself and Stu Chapman who after serving nine years were given that honorary title and have all rights of membership except voting at the board meetings. All members serve on at least one committee but usually two. Personally I am on the archive committee and the collections committee (20+ years). It is this latter committee that is specific to your question. This committee meets monthly at the museum and considers the following; 1. Vehicle or artifact acquisitions 2. Vehicle or artifact deaccessions (selling or donating) 3. Loan considerations 4. Considerations on long term goals for augmenting the collection. This committee is a recommending body and subject to overview by the entire board. However it is rare that the board will over rule committee recommendations. Meetings are chaired by the museum curator who submits agendas and follows up with the minutes and reports results to the full board. In recent years that person has been Andy Beckman who also serves as archivists (the curator position is currently vacant as we had a resignation about 6 weeks ago).

Yes, the city of South Bend makes a monthly contribution to the museum that covers principally the building utilities cost and general maintenance. The city is not involved in any fashion in the governance of the Studebaker National Museum Inc., a separate entity.

Yes, of course the museum has an annual audit. The treasurer (volunteer) and museum staff have been consistently praised for their conscientious attention to every detail of the financial operations of the museum. Members of the board are sent a monthly treasurers report detailing all income and expenses and these are presented and discussed at each monthly board meeting. Restricted funds are separately accounted for in the report. My latest report shows approx. $29, 500 in the restoration fund.

That’s the short version. The long version could include 1. The names of all the collections committee members 2. The detailed collections plan with list of future acquisitions we are working on 3. A list of all recently donated items 4. A list of all offers that have been rejected. 5. A complete list of all income and expenditures for the past fiscal year. 6. A list of all current cash assets held by the Studebaker National Museum Inc. and their locations. I am really not devoted enough to provide all of that information here but it is available.

I assure you that the Studebaker National Museum Inc. is in good hands thanks to a competent and devoted staff as well as a conscientious and dedicated board. Might also give a special congratulatory nod to Becky Bonham who has served ably as director for the past 15 years and will retire in January.

Below photos of the museum board at their October 2015 meeting.

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Studebaker Wheel
11-12-2015, 06:48 PM
One question that was posed that I did not touch on i.e. the criterion used in making the decision on what vehicles are to be kept and which sold.




The principal consideration is do we already have one that is the same or similar? In an ideal situation we would have a 10 story building or million square foot facility to house one of each model and body style for every year Studebaker made vehicles. Considering the space limitations the committee members are called upon regularly to make value judgments. They do not always agree but each vehicle under consideration is given careful consideration and is voted on and the majority has its way. (For example while it might be nice to have one each of the 1962 – ‘63 and ‘64 GT Hawks it is not really practical. Having one as a representation is about the best we can hope for. )
Does the vehicle have some special historic significance? The Brooks Stevens prototype cars and Raymond Loewy prototype Avantis come to mind. All, by the way, purchased by donations from the SDC.
Does the vehicle fit within the museum’s acquisition priority list. The museum has a list of about 15 vehicles that it is actively seeking to add to the permanent collection. For example we currently have no convertible sedans from the period 1932-33 or 1938-39. Also no Speedster. These are but two examples.
The cost and condition of the vehicle. The museum, of course, prefers original vehicles or those restored to museum quality standards. We have neither the time, facilities nor expertise to accept cars in poor condition and restore them to museum quality. The last one that was done was the ’47 woody wagon and it took about 15 years to complete using volunteer labor. While that was certainly an outstanding subject to restore and an excellent example of volunteerism that is no longer an option we wish to pursue.

Stu Chapman
11-12-2015, 09:14 PM
Some of the remarks in this thread have been of significant concern to those of us who have devoted many years of effort to save a historic collection and bring it to the position and reputation it currently holds. It is one of only three accredited automotive museums in the United States, which is clearly something to be proud of.

I have reviewed this thread with Dick Quinn and I wholeheartedly endorse his very informative and authoritative overview of how our Museum operates. I would add that no donated car has ever been sold without the donor understanding that such action was an option and part of the original agreement. Also, the check-off voluntary donations that SDC members make when they renew their memberships go to the SDC Capital Cost Committee which is chaired by National Board member Bob Henning and includes Max Gretencord and myself.

Funds raised from SDC members in this manner are provided to the Museum for improvements and/or replacements of various Museum needs such as signage, audio/visual equipment, etc. Annual requests are made by the Museum to this Committee who assesses the validity of the request and makes its recommendation to the SDC board for approval or otherwise.

May I respectfully suggest that our members seriously consider becoming members of the Studebaker National Museum. The cost is very nominal and would provide us with additional revenue. Simply log onto the Studebaker National Museum web site and learn all about it. You can also find out what is going on regularly at the Museum. Members in the South Bend area are particularly encouraged to become volunteers, and potentially members of Museum committees.

Hopefully our mutual responses will put an end to the negative posts that seem to have derailed this thread.

Stu Chapman

Studebaker Wheel
11-13-2015, 02:30 AM
Dick,

Maybe you can tell us who chooses which cars are to stay and which are to be sold. Maybe as important, which cars are considered worthy of being displayed while others continue to languish in the basement. There was no duplicate car to the 1933 President Speedway on display until it became a prominent feature of the collection. Yet that same car had remained in the corner of the basement for years without any indication to the previous owner that it would ever be displayed!

Bill; Have answered part of your question in a separate post here. As for the '33 President Speedway it has been on prominent display for the past few years in the "Classic Car" section on the second floor. See image below. Generally the curator and the design consultant make the decision as to which vehicles are displayed and where. Naturally I do not always agree but there is only so much space and the vehicles are rotated depending on a number of factors.

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BobPalma
11-13-2015, 06:02 AM
:!: Thanks, Stu and Dick, for your contributions to set the record(s) straight.

Our new Studebaker National Museum is celebrating its 10th year this year(!) and deserves our wholehearted support. It is well-run by an enthusiastic, thoughtful group of employees, supported by an intelligent, dedicated Board of Directors....and numerous unpaid volunteers! All of them deserve our physical, emotional, and financial support.

As is typical on our "wild west" forum, here, folks with far less knowledge of what is going on, some of whom aren't even SDC members, are quick to tender opinions with minimal knowledge of the physical confines and/or financial realities of running this (or any other) museum. We should rather be rejoicing :D in having one of the finest automobile museums in the country, designed and built from the ground up with all the contemporary environmental considerations possible to secure the collections for time immemorial. ;)

Carry on, Stu and Dick. :!: :cool: BP

Bob Henning
11-13-2015, 10:48 AM
Bob,
Thank you for saying what needs to be said. As a member of the SDC, member of the Studebaker National Museum, and as the Chair of the Capital Cost Committee, I can tell you that in my opinion, the Museum, and its path is in good hands, and the the veteran members of the SDC, the other members of that Board, including the current President of our SDC Club Tom Curtis, have the best interest of the Museum as a priority. Remember, these people do this for free, can give their time, money, and efforts to something else, and have chosen Studebaker as their passion. We are lucky that we have a place like this, and that it will be taken care of long after we have moved on.

I believe this thread started to point out that a great car will be going to a new home, and took a direction that it was not meant to go. Thank you for getting back with the points that were brought up. While I believe in the power of free speech, with that power comes backing statements with actual facts, and first hand knowledge, both of which did not happen. I have learned over the years that things happen for a reason. Some things one can change, some things one can't, and it takes wisdom to know the difference. Decisions were made, and we have a great Museum that is second only to Notre Dame Football as the place to go in South Bend. I think that posts that are not based in fact should be taken off. Thank you Stu and Dick for responding to these postings in a very classy manner.

Finally, in an attempt to go back to the original direction this post was going....

I would love to have that car! What a beautiful piece of History!

jclary
11-13-2015, 12:56 PM
.....Finally, in an attempt to go back to the original direction this post was going....

I would love to have that car! What a beautiful piece of History!

Came in for lunch and read Bob Palma and Bob Henning's posts. EXCELLENT!:!:

As I said earlier...if it was required...I'd be willing to walk to South Bend to take possession of this car! Even with the negative swerve off the road with this discussion, there is a very positive result. It has given some of our most dedicated, trustworthy, knowledgeable, and dependable SDC devotees a platform to explain things otherwise not known by the general membership and public at large. Far too many of us appreciate how things work and get accomplished. It's like the plumbing in your home. As long as the faucet works and toilet flushes, hardly a thought, until something goes wrong. Add to that, a certain group of folks negatively oriented to believe that if things are proceeding as expected...Something must be wrong!:eek:

I think of the Museum's pre-automobile age artifacts. I have never read that J. M. Studebaker himself began preserving those items, but have made that assumption from casual comments/conversations, bits and pieces of information, here and there, as an enthusiast. (Sorry to you folks who have written all the great contributions to Turning Wheels for decades, that I didn't read with enough comprehension to appropriately credit.)

Point being, that those oldest items have somehow survived, been cared for, and preserved for our enjoyment to this very day. It would be absolutely impossible without dedicated and honest folks for this many decades. I have served in roles as a volunteer officer in many organizations. I'll admit, in my younger days, much of my motivation was tempered by ego. What I learned is that ego is a very weak motivator. It is those who are truly motivated to work beyond "self interest," that hang in, ignore the negative, and overcome problems, that make the best workers. Apparently, the SDC, and the Museum have been blessed with great volunteers.

I have kept my head down and avoided positions for years now. Reason being, I've concluded there are others much more qualified, better organized, and capable. Not accepting positions that I wouldn't perform well is my contribution. So...Thank you to all who serve!:!:

This thread has provided me valuable insight to the Museum.:)

hausdok
11-13-2015, 10:26 PM
Unbelievable critique of the museum here and the extraordinary job to they do to help keep a long gone and relatively unpopular auto make alive for those (few) of us who appreciate Studebakers.

I can only surmise that some people are happiest when they are unhappy...and go to great lengths to find something to be unhappy about.

Ain't that the truth. Is it my imagination; or do we really have what seems to be a disproportionate amount of curmudgeons here compared to other boards?

Chris_Dresbach
11-15-2015, 10:15 AM
The ironic part about this thread is that when I asked questions like "where does the money from the sales of these cars go?" I had no intent of causing negativity. I feel that as a member of the general population that is interested in Studebakers, as well as a South Bend tax payer, I as well as everybody else should have the right to know what's really going on at the museum. I think it's kind of picular that asking the hard questions like that caused such an uproar. The simple fact that a Studebaker Museum exists should not be an excuse to cover up what goes on behind the scenes and a simple answer should be given when questions are asked about the inner workings of the Museum. If questions are avoided, then in my opinion I see a red flag.

Studebaker Wheel
11-15-2015, 11:42 AM
.....a simple answer should be given when questions are asked about the inner workings of the Museum.

I thought that's what I provided.....and w/o any editorial comment?Did I fail?

Chris_Dresbach
11-15-2015, 11:59 AM
Kind of yes and kind of no. Yes you did answer many questions and for that I am greatful. The no part is the fact that it took a long time and ruffled a lot of feather to get there. The only things left without any certainty are where specifically the money goes from the sale of each car. There was also a comment made about a GT Hawk. My original comment mentioned that there was a GT in the basement but it got sold rather fast; not sure why.
Personally I don't really care how the museum operates. "Not my circus, not my show". But I think a little better public transparency would be beneficial to the museum.

SN-60
11-15-2015, 12:39 PM
Unbelievable critique of the museum here and the extraordinary job to they do to help keep a long gone and relatively unpopular auto make alive for those (few) of us who appreciate Studebakers.

I can only surmise that some people are happiest when they are unhappy...and go to great lengths to find something to be unhappy about.



Try to understand Dick.....A straightforward financial question is being asked here.....NO ONE is criticizing the SNM or its staff. :)

Hallabutt
11-15-2015, 03:02 PM
Thanks Dick for responding. My question was maybe more rhetorical then analytical but, your response was really helpful to understanding the museum's politics. I do appreciate the museum and the historical exposure that it provides, and I realize that it's operation is more important then any individual contributor. I won't get into the personal nature of the situation that prompted my question regarding the decision making process, but the information here can go a long way to preventing hard feelings in the future. It is incumbent upon any individual, who is considering a major contribution, to understand the limitations he has once he has made his commitment.

I only hope that someone who has an understanding of the rarity of the 33, and the car's eighty years as a survivor, will be the high bidder. Unfortunately too often a car like this says something else to a street rodder.

2moredoors
11-15-2015, 04:39 PM
Quote:"While I believe in the power of free speech, with that power comes backing statements with actual facts, and first hand knowledge, both of which did not happen. I have learned over the years that things happen for a reason. Some things one can change, some things one can't, and it takes wisdom to know the difference. Decisions were made, and we have a great Museum that is second only to Notre Dame Football as the place to go in South Bend. I think that posts that are not based in fact should be taken off. Thank you Stu and Dick for responding to these postings in a very classy manner." unquote

I take a slightly different view with the latter part of the above comment. The SDC funds this forum and has rules for posting and as long as we follow the rules that should be it. Anything more is censorship.

Even though this thread took a direction it may not have been intended some extremely important and positive questions have been answered and we are now better informed and for that I thank all who contributed. There is no such thing as a bad question and for this thread it would appear the answers were quite good. I do however agree whole heartedly with your statement "things happen for a reason". Maybe this thread was meant to inform.

Again thank you "all" who participated.

2R5
11-15-2015, 06:03 PM
Well said Cliff , you should of ran for prez !

alaipairod
11-15-2015, 07:31 PM
My final comment is, I think this thread has become one of the most debated and informative that I have read.
I can't say enough about the members and their willingness to express an opinion.
I commend the Studebaker National Museum and it's staff and volunteers. Their work has led to the reason why Studebaker is alive today.

TWChamp
11-16-2015, 11:08 AM
Top bid was $18,100. I'd like to see the car in person, but I thought it would have been bid higher than that. Not only is Studebaker a great car to own, it's one of the most affordable to buy and restore.

Studebaker Wheel
11-16-2015, 12:38 PM
The bid did not meet the reserve and will be relisted some time fairly soon.