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StudeRich
10-30-2015, 05:23 PM
There are just SO many cool topics brought up in those Lamberti papers from July 1, 1963 that have been discussed here before but in no way were all of the MANY interesting Topics discussed.

They actually had SO much going on and "Irons in the Fire" at that time, it's really too bad few were accomplished.

Here are some very interesting ones:

3. Avanti

Mr. Dredge noted that we’re getting constant inquiries about the Avanti when we show the ’64 line. He asked if Engineering could build an Avanti with square lamps and the new grille for PR pictures between now and the end of the month. Mr. Hardig replied that it would not be possible to build a car but suggested that he use Mr. Egbert’s car which should be back within a week. Mr. Feuer commented that we are in the position where we aren’t saying we will have a ’64 Avanti.

6. 1965 Model Passenger Cars

We had a meeting with Kip Stevens a week ago Thursday and went over some proposals on the ’65 program. Now he is working on some renderings. We will have one job that will be longer by 6” or 7” to see what it looks like. We are making some studies and, of course, it will all have to be analyzed and approved as to cost. We’re roughing it out on our original clay model.

7. 1965 Model Truck

We have a truck pretty well along that you can get in and out of, and we expect to get it finished by the week of the 8th. The first mockup will have a pickup-type box on it – we will have the van type later on. This is a ½-ton and ¾-ton truck that is completely new and a 1¾” wider than the Econ-O-Liner. We widened the tread so that you can put a complete sheet of plywood in between the wheel housings.

8. Police Cars

A chat Mr. Egbert had with a policeman in the State of Washington triggered an idea to offer roll bars and disc brakes on all state bids. Since the legislatures of most states advocate safety, it is an opportunity to sell them these distinctively Studebaker safety features on state vehicles. Mr. Egbert asked Mr. Hardig to see how much trouble it would be to put a roll bar in our ’64 car and what the premium would be. He also asked Mr. Dredge to draft a letter to all governors pointing up that Studebaker has been pushing safety with padded dash, full headroom, etc., and that now we can offer a roll bar and disc brakes as additional protection to the officer who risks his life every time he chases someone. If we get any kind of reasonable response from the governors, we should get on with the specifications and begin offering them on all state bids before our competition can react.

Mr. Dredge commented that at the driving demonstration PR held at the proving grounds for the State Police, the officers found it hard to believe how well our short-wheelbase cars handle with the traction bars and sway bars on them.


Even only FOUR Topics may be too much for this one Post to handle the comments on each!

Recently on another Post Craig posted this Link to the old post with the "Lamberti Papers" info.


http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?55529-The-Lamberti-papers-26-(July-1-1963)

qsanford
10-30-2015, 07:54 PM
The '65 Passenger car proposal sounds intriguing. I wonder if the extra length was in wheelbase or overhang?

8E45E
10-30-2015, 08:27 PM
The '65 Passenger car proposal sounds intriguing. I wonder if the extra length was in wheelbase or overhang?

Overhang: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?16235-Brooks-Stevens-1965-Concept-Design

Craig

Milaca
10-30-2015, 10:21 PM
The 1965 truck...are they referring to the flat sided, flat front cab-over engine model that resides in the Studebaker museum's basement?

StudeRich
10-31-2015, 02:04 AM
The 1965 truck...are they referring to the flat sided, flat front cab-over engine model that resides in the Studebaker museum's basement?

That would be my guess, but I do not remember hearing about a Van based on that same Flat metal design of the Cab forward Dodge or Ford Falcon/Econoline like Pickup Truck prototype that I sat in during the late Summer of 1966 at the Plant 8 Parts Warehouse and noticed the Tag on the steering wheel that said: "Steering components welded, do not Drive." :ohmy:

8E45E
10-31-2015, 03:26 AM
That would be my guess, but I do not remember hearing about a Van based on that same Flat metal design of the Cab forward Dodge or Ford Falcon/Econoline like Pickup Truck prototype that I sat in during the late Summer of 1966 at the Plant 8 Parts Warehouse and noticed the Tag on the steering wheel that said: "Steering components welded, do not Drive." :ohmy:

I read the van version went to Westinghouse for evaluation.

Craig

DougHolverson
10-31-2015, 05:42 AM
So the flat-front truck found in a barn a few years ago the same one? Was the steering still welded? Why would it have been welded in the first place?

56H-Y6
10-31-2015, 07:53 AM
Hi

"........some proposals on the ’65 program. Now he is working on some renderings. We will have one job that will be longer by 6” or 7” to see what it looks like."

In the July 1963 timeframe, with the current sedan/wagon 113" wheelbase, adding 6"-7" to the wheelbase would result in a 120" wb, nearly the same as the 120'5" Hawk chassis. Perhaps there was thought being given to reviving a full-sized model like the erstwhile President Classic on that chassis.

Adding more overhang would have resulted in an ill-proportioned, approximately intermediate-size car. Ironically, the 1963 113" wheelbase, 188" overall length would a decade later be called "International-Sized" of Mercedes-Benz SEL and BMW models finding increasing acceptance.

Steve

StudeRich
10-31-2015, 03:54 PM
So the flat-front truck found in a barn a few years ago the same one? Was the steering still welded? Why would it have been welded in the first place?

I don't know if the Studebaker National Museum's Cabover truck came from a barn.

But it is quite obvious why the steering was welded, it was not mechanically complete because, for a "Design Study" to sell to Management you don't need to spend wasted time and money to make it drive, stop and turn, just so they can look at it.

Maybe they used RE Bars for tie rods, :D just to keep the wheels pointing the same way so you could push it around or very carefully drive it at idle, I don't know.