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View Full Version : Excellent Studebaker Adm. Bldg. article



BobPalma
11-19-2007, 08:19 PM
:) 'Just today got our subscription copy of the November 2007 Indiana Preservationist, the official monthly magazine of Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana, of which Cari and I are long-time members.

Therein is an excellent, full-page article on The Studebaker Administration Building, entitled Automotive Landmark Built for Long Haul. The report deals with the successful re-use of the building Dick Quinn reported to SDCers in The Studebaker Almanac this past summer. I have accessed the Foundation's website and tried in vain to find a link to this entire article so I could post a link here, but I am sorry that none seems to be available on-line.

Anyway, here's the concluding paragraph of this upbeat article:

"Once again, historic preservation and economic development worked hand-in-hand. This large, historic building -off the local property tax rolls more than 40 years- is being re-purposed for a productive new use, proving that preservation is good business," declares Todd Zeiger. And a rare Studebaker survior retains its place in the South Bend landscape - a save worth celebrating!

Todd Zeiger, you may recall, is the Director of the Historic Landmarks Foundation regional office in South Bend. Todd was the point man for securing the building's productive re-use. He was also the enabler who allowed SDC members to tour the building during this year's SDC International Meet, before the building's renovation began. Some of the Forum regulars may have had Mr. Zeiger as a Tour Guide, in that he was one of us conducting tours that evening. [8D] BP

Avantidon
11-20-2007, 06:19 AM
Bob thanks for sharing as this is a building that is well worth the efforts to save and reports of this nature just add to that perspective.

See you in the future as I write about our past

Avantidon
11-20-2007, 06:19 AM
Bob thanks for sharing as this is a building that is well worth the efforts to save and reports of this nature just add to that perspective.

See you in the future as I write about our past

Studedude1961
11-20-2007, 08:13 PM
It's great that the Administration Building is going to be saved. At some point in the not-too-distant future it may be the ONLY Studebaker building in the corridor left standing.

Studedude1961
--1963 Cruiser

Studedude1961
11-20-2007, 08:13 PM
It's great that the Administration Building is going to be saved. At some point in the not-too-distant future it may be the ONLY Studebaker building in the corridor left standing.

Studedude1961
--1963 Cruiser

BobPalma
11-20-2007, 08:49 PM
quote:Originally posted by Studedude1961

At some point in the not-too-distant future it may be the ONLY Studebaker building in the corridor left standing.
Studedude1961
--1963 Cruiser


:) I wish I could disagree with you, John, but I can't. [V]

Two factors, only one of which was Studebaker's doing, helped "save" The Administration Building:

1. Studebaker's doing: Having the building so well designed and constructed in the first place. Almost 100 years to the day it was placed in service, it is still in remarkably good structural condition, especially considering the hostile midwestern rust belt industrial environment in which it has lived.

2. Not Studebaker's doing, further quoting from the article I referenced:

"The landmark [Studebaker Administration Building] sits near a hub of fiber-optic lines that offer both high-speed connectivity and a transcontinental link. The building's concrete floors, fireproof vaults, and high ceilings also make it well-suited as a server warehouse," says Doug Chamberlain, principal of Heritage Restoration and Development [the building's redevelopers]. "Companies using this kind of service are looking for a safe place to store their information," Chamberlain added, "This century-old building is structurally ahead of its time. It's ideal for this high-tech business use."

[^] BP

BobPalma
11-20-2007, 08:49 PM
quote:Originally posted by Studedude1961

At some point in the not-too-distant future it may be the ONLY Studebaker building in the corridor left standing.
Studedude1961
--1963 Cruiser


:) I wish I could disagree with you, John, but I can't. [V]

Two factors, only one of which was Studebaker's doing, helped "save" The Administration Building:

1. Studebaker's doing: Having the building so well designed and constructed in the first place. Almost 100 years to the day it was placed in service, it is still in remarkably good structural condition, especially considering the hostile midwestern rust belt industrial environment in which it has lived.

2. Not Studebaker's doing, further quoting from the article I referenced:

"The landmark [Studebaker Administration Building] sits near a hub of fiber-optic lines that offer both high-speed connectivity and a transcontinental link. The building's concrete floors, fireproof vaults, and high ceilings also make it well-suited as a server warehouse," says Doug Chamberlain, principal of Heritage Restoration and Development [the building's redevelopers]. "Companies using this kind of service are looking for a safe place to store their information," Chamberlain added, "This century-old building is structurally ahead of its time. It's ideal for this high-tech business use."

[^] BP

Guido
11-20-2007, 08:54 PM
And lets not forget its close proximity to the train tracks which has caused its foundation to rumble hundreds of thousands of times.

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/53/453/1/21/36/2964121360097493054pVJTFL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/57/757/2/88/4/2023288040097493054SEKowB_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/18/19/8/37/21/2050837210097493054IYBJJL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/559/1/43/57/2876143570097493054jKVhDw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/22/22/0/2/68/2589002680097493054ftBuBw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/8/30/30/2075830300097493054aSSlFv_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/459/2/23/86/2067223860097493054YoeGMx_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/5/18/33/2537518330097493054OgEKcN_th.jpg
Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

Studebaker horse drawn doctor’s buggy; Studebaker horse drawn “Izzer” buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures" (including a 1959 IH B-120 4 wheel drive, a 1970 Dodge W-200 Power Wagon and numerous Oliver and Cockshutt tractors).

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

Guido
11-20-2007, 08:54 PM
And lets not forget its close proximity to the train tracks which has caused its foundation to rumble hundreds of thousands of times.

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/53/453/1/21/36/2964121360097493054pVJTFL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/57/757/2/88/4/2023288040097493054SEKowB_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/18/19/8/37/21/2050837210097493054IYBJJL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/559/1/43/57/2876143570097493054jKVhDw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/22/22/0/2/68/2589002680097493054ftBuBw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/8/30/30/2075830300097493054aSSlFv_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/459/2/23/86/2067223860097493054YoeGMx_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/5/18/33/2537518330097493054OgEKcN_th.jpg
Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

Studebaker horse drawn doctor’s buggy; Studebaker horse drawn “Izzer” buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures" (including a 1959 IH B-120 4 wheel drive, a 1970 Dodge W-200 Power Wagon and numerous Oliver and Cockshutt tractors).

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

BobPalma
11-20-2007, 09:08 PM
quote:Originally posted by Guido

And lets not forget its close proximity to the train tracks which has caused its foundation to rumble hundreds of thousands of times.



:) True, Gary: The building's solidity and foundation depth must be experienced to be believed. Several trains passed by while we took the tour extensive tour earlier in the spring, before plans were hatched for the SDC member tours during the International Meet.

Then, when "Tour Guiding" during the International Meet tours, I would encourage my groups to stand still and try to feel vibration when a train passed by. Honest, it is eerily absent.

That building is one stout structure! [:0][}:)] BP

BobPalma
11-20-2007, 09:08 PM
quote:Originally posted by Guido

And lets not forget its close proximity to the train tracks which has caused its foundation to rumble hundreds of thousands of times.



:) True, Gary: The building's solidity and foundation depth must be experienced to be believed. Several trains passed by while we took the tour extensive tour earlier in the spring, before plans were hatched for the SDC member tours during the International Meet.

Then, when "Tour Guiding" during the International Meet tours, I would encourage my groups to stand still and try to feel vibration when a train passed by. Honest, it is eerily absent.

That building is one stout structure! [:0][}:)] BP

8E45E
11-21-2007, 08:05 AM
quote:Originally posted by BobPalma


quote:Originally posted by Studedude1961

At some point in the not-too-distant future it may be the ONLY Studebaker building in the corridor left standing.
Studedude1961
--1963 Cruiser


:) I wish I could disagree with you, John, but I can't. [V]

Two factors, only one of which was Studebaker's doing, helped "save" The Administration Building:



If there is one building that I really want to see get saved, the Administration Building is indeed the one!! But as for the rest of the buildings as per my visit last summer, I would say the building(s) immediately to the west (Building #84?) stands a good chance of survival while it is fully occupied. I believe it was your article that stated they were the newest buildings in the complex, and taking a relatively close look at the exterior last summer, that building appears to be in relatively good shape. I didn't see any broken windows, crumbling brickwork, or any of the other maladies that caught up with the rest of the buildings that made them demolition candidates. I would have to say the Foundry is definitely on borrowed time, and the Engineering building won't be far behind. I, for one would like to see at least one of the actual 'blue collar' buildings stay standing, and hopefully that one behind the Administration building remains.

Craig

8E45E
11-21-2007, 08:05 AM
quote:Originally posted by BobPalma


quote:Originally posted by Studedude1961

At some point in the not-too-distant future it may be the ONLY Studebaker building in the corridor left standing.
Studedude1961
--1963 Cruiser


:) I wish I could disagree with you, John, but I can't. [V]

Two factors, only one of which was Studebaker's doing, helped "save" The Administration Building:



If there is one building that I really want to see get saved, the Administration Building is indeed the one!! But as for the rest of the buildings as per my visit last summer, I would say the building(s) immediately to the west (Building #84?) stands a good chance of survival while it is fully occupied. I believe it was your article that stated they were the newest buildings in the complex, and taking a relatively close look at the exterior last summer, that building appears to be in relatively good shape. I didn't see any broken windows, crumbling brickwork, or any of the other maladies that caught up with the rest of the buildings that made them demolition candidates. I would have to say the Foundry is definitely on borrowed time, and the Engineering building won't be far behind. I, for one would like to see at least one of the actual 'blue collar' buildings stay standing, and hopefully that one behind the Administration building remains.

Craig

BobPalma
11-21-2007, 08:40 AM
:) True, Craig: A "blue-collar" building being saved would be nice.

My personal favorite is the Foundry. I know it will probably go down before too long, but I hate to see that. I like to close my eyes and imagine a typical work day in 1950, a year in which when the foundry probably poured over 400,000 blocks and heads (including service parts), while installing all the tooling to produce the new V-8! That was American Industry in one of its finest hours...and now it is dead, with the same work being done overseas. :([xx(]:(

The Indianapolis Chrysler Foundry met a similar fate about two years ago...barely five years after they plowed $10,000,000 into making it environmentally friendly! Now, that huge foundry footprint is just that: A footprint, scraped clean with weeds growing where they once poured the later 426 hemi blocks, I am told, among more plebian powerplants. Most of the work that was done there is now in Brazil, of all things. GRRRR.... [:0]:(

(At least the 4.7L block for my 2002 Dakota was poured in Indianapolis!) :D BP

BobPalma
11-21-2007, 08:40 AM
:) True, Craig: A "blue-collar" building being saved would be nice.

My personal favorite is the Foundry. I know it will probably go down before too long, but I hate to see that. I like to close my eyes and imagine a typical work day in 1950, a year in which when the foundry probably poured over 400,000 blocks and heads (including service parts), while installing all the tooling to produce the new V-8! That was American Industry in one of its finest hours...and now it is dead, with the same work being done overseas. :([xx(]:(

The Indianapolis Chrysler Foundry met a similar fate about two years ago...barely five years after they plowed $10,000,000 into making it environmentally friendly! Now, that huge foundry footprint is just that: A footprint, scraped clean with weeds growing where they once poured the later 426 hemi blocks, I am told, among more plebian powerplants. Most of the work that was done there is now in Brazil, of all things. GRRRR.... [:0]:(

(At least the 4.7L block for my 2002 Dakota was poured in Indianapolis!) :D BP

toyman
11-21-2007, 11:02 PM
Bob P. Several years ago when we toured the Admin Bldg (with a very bldg knowledgeable guide), I asked him the proverbial question, "why can't the museum take over this building". His answer stunned me. He said that years ago the natural gas lines that served the lights on the roof that went up the main vertical building columns were disconnected and cut off just below the roof line and then tar papered over. Over time, water got into those columns and rusted the interior of those columns to the point where it would cost millions of dollars to correct and make structurally safe. Do you know if any of that story is true, and, is that problem being addressed?

toyman

toyman
11-21-2007, 11:02 PM
Bob P. Several years ago when we toured the Admin Bldg (with a very bldg knowledgeable guide), I asked him the proverbial question, "why can't the museum take over this building". His answer stunned me. He said that years ago the natural gas lines that served the lights on the roof that went up the main vertical building columns were disconnected and cut off just below the roof line and then tar papered over. Over time, water got into those columns and rusted the interior of those columns to the point where it would cost millions of dollars to correct and make structurally safe. Do you know if any of that story is true, and, is that problem being addressed?

toyman

BobPalma
11-22-2007, 05:46 AM
quote:Originally posted by toyman

Bob P. Several years ago when we toured the Admin Bldg (with a very bldg knowledgeable guide), I asked him the proverbial question, "why can't the museum take over this building". His answer stunned me. He said that years ago the natural gas lines that served the lights on the roof that went up the main vertical building columns were disconnected and cut off just below the roof line and then tar papered over. Over time, water got into those columns and rusted the interior of those columns to the point where it would cost millions of dollars to correct and make structurally safe. Do you know if any of that story is true, and, is that problem being addressed?

toyman


:) That's the first I've ever heard of that! I don't claim to have all that much knowledge of the building, but I've never heard any hint of that scenario. [:0] BP

BobPalma
11-22-2007, 05:46 AM
quote:Originally posted by toyman

Bob P. Several years ago when we toured the Admin Bldg (with a very bldg knowledgeable guide), I asked him the proverbial question, "why can't the museum take over this building". His answer stunned me. He said that years ago the natural gas lines that served the lights on the roof that went up the main vertical building columns were disconnected and cut off just below the roof line and then tar papered over. Over time, water got into those columns and rusted the interior of those columns to the point where it would cost millions of dollars to correct and make structurally safe. Do you know if any of that story is true, and, is that problem being addressed?

toyman


:) That's the first I've ever heard of that! I don't claim to have all that much knowledge of the building, but I've never heard any hint of that scenario. [:0] BP