PDA

View Full Version : "StudeGrip" Tire Stud Division



DEEPNHOCK
07-21-2015, 09:23 PM
Interesting Reading


http://www.automotive-fleet.com/article/story/1966/04/big-gains-for-studded-tire-division-automobile-making-demise-ends-era1.aspx

(copy)
StudeGrip Tire Stud Division
One of the many successful divisions of Studebaker Corporation was due to the recent boom in the tire stud industry which Studebaker itself was influential in bringing about. StudeGrip Tire Stud Division's president, Joseph DeFranco described its sales growth as "completely beyond our expectations. Studebaker used its full production capacity, then expanded that capacity, and will have to expand it even further in order to meet the demand expected next season."
StudeGrip originated with the acquisition by Studebaker in 1963 of the exclusive U.S. license for the manufacturing of tungsten carbide tire studs. "StudeGrip was the first major producer of this type of stud in United States, and for the past two years has been the largest producer also," according to Clifford Rathmanner, director of sales. Rathmanner reported that the phenomenal growth of sales jumped from 25 million studs sold during the winter of 1964 and 1965 to 275 million in 1965 and 1966 and is anticipated to more than double during 1966 and 1967."

sweetolbob
07-21-2015, 09:37 PM
I remember those studs and they worked as advertised. That was back in the days of having a separate set of "Snow" tires. You could buy recaps that had the stud holes as part of the tire tread and the tire dealer would install the studs. The little buggers worked well on our winter road conditions but after a couple of years there was a distinct wear pattern on the roads. That's why they went away.

They made an average snow tire into great winter tire.

Neat memory, thx for the post. Bob

ndynis
07-21-2015, 09:42 PM
Interesting story. Thanks for posting.
Nick

StudeRich
07-21-2015, 11:26 PM
We still have those Clunky things here in Washington, but of course they are not Tungston, just Steel I think and they do have to repair the ruts in the roads a lot.

acolds
07-23-2015, 03:41 PM
I have been using snow tires with studs since they came out first ones were on my 61 Hawk with TT and studs it would go almost anywhere. Pa did outlaw them for a couple of years but were later allowed again. With our weather and hills studs make winter driving much easier. I still use them I prefer rear wheel drive cars and snow tires with studs are the best combo for them. Also have studded snow tires for our newer Mustang, Challenger and Lincoln. Being from the old school I also carry a shovel and tire chains in the winter better to have a when needed than want for them.

Colgate Studebaker
07-23-2015, 03:55 PM
I remember "studding" the Armstrong snow tires we sold back then. Seemed like hundreds of them. The snow tires came to us without the studs, but were made with the holes to receive them. We had a neat little gun that you loaded with studs, then pushed the jaws into the hole and hit the trigger. If all worked properly the jaws would spread the hole open and a little ram in the gun would push the stud in. We sold Armstrong tires, an unusual brand, but they were very good tires. In Wisconsin studded tires were legal for several years, but the road damage eventually changed the minds of the powers that be and studs were outlawed. I must have pulled out studs for weeks the first year they were no longer legal. THAT is a job I will never do again, of coarse living here in Florida now, I will hopefully never see another snow tire. Bill

Corvanti
07-23-2015, 07:20 PM
^ around 1970, i recall that my Dad, when he worked at Sears Auto, said that Armstrong made their Sears brand bias ply tires and Michelin made the radials...

SN-60
07-23-2015, 07:26 PM
I remember those studs and they worked as advertised. That was back in the days of having a separate set of "Snow" tires. Bob


Not TOO many days ago Bob! :whome:

Buzzard
07-24-2015, 11:36 AM
Thanks for the post Jeff.
I knew SN-60 would chime in 'cause I could hear him coming! Well I gotta chime too.
I did not know about StudeGrip but am very familiar with Seco among others. I travelled Western Canada through some of the most ferocious storms we ever experienced. My success, I feel was solely due to driving on four studded winters(rear drive Olds) of a major brand such as Michelin. You really do get what you pay for in technology that works. In later years our Tire, Wheel and Auto Service Center was located on the side of the mountains in North and West Vancouver, British Columbia. We sold tens of thousands of studs because they worked. We believed in them, made our customers believe in them and ultimately reduced the number of accidents due to making all our customers safer. One year, in the spring, a customer brought me a very nice bottle of wine and simply stated "thanks for saving my family's lives". Studs were badly maligned by the ignorant media. According to my suppliers, we sold more studs than all of competition combined. As Bill states in post#6, we kept four guns going at all times as you did not want a gun failure when you were half way through a studding operation. You would never want to arm wrestle my guys who did the stud installations! We always sold them in sets of four, never two, even on rear drives as it's no good getting rolling if you can't steer or stop. We even ran a continuous loop VHS video for our customers showing an engineer testing them (vs all seasons and non-studded winters) in Stu's province of Ontario where they were banned. He sum-mated at the end that even though they were illegal, he would drive with them in winter due to the overwhelming advantage they supplied over not having them. He stated he would rather pay the fine and be safe. As SN-60 can attest, once you have driven with four studded tires through inclement winter conditions, you'll never go back to not having them. It's amazing again that Studebaker pioneered this fine invention.
Cheers, Bill

Mikado282
07-25-2015, 08:44 PM
I remember "studding" the Armstrong snow tires we sold back then. Seemed like hundreds of them. The snow tires came to us without the studs, but were made with the holes to receive them. We had a neat little gun that you loaded with studs, then pushed the jaws into the hole and hit the trigger. If all worked properly the jaws would spread the hole open and a little ram in the gun would push the stud in. We sold Armstrong tires, an unusual brand, but they were very good tires. In Wisconsin studded tires were legal for several years, but the road damage eventually changed the minds of the powers that be and studs were outlawed. I must have pulled out studs for weeks the first year they were no longer legal. THAT is a job I will never do again, of coarse living here in Florida now, I will hopefully never see another snow tire. Bill

I remember Armstrong tires, they were advertised as being "Rhino" tough. Also remember "sawdust cap" snow tires that had sawdust mixed in the rubber that made the capping tread.

Bish
07-26-2015, 07:33 PM
Here in Vermont, they still allow studded tires, but here it's the pics in the snowmobile tracks that cause damage where they cross the road.