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52-fan
07-09-2015, 08:07 PM
My brother has some valves, lifters, pistons and some other parts that a previous owner had allowed to get wet. They are NOS but have various amounts of light rust. Are these parts worth anything are should they just go in the scrap pile?

Bo Markham
07-09-2015, 08:25 PM
Generally speaking, people don't like to buy new parts that are rusty. I on the other hand view this stuff with an eye to serviceability. If it is light surface rust, ONLY, and is not pitted, but merely stained, I'd buy it and use it my self. What engine does the stuff fit? I'd probably be interested in the stuff if your brother wants to sell as opposed to consigning it to the scrap pile?

PackardV8
07-09-2015, 09:17 PM
Yes, as Bo says, it's hard to sell rusty parts. However, that should never stop a CASO from buying them. If one is willing to put the grunt into cleaning them, most are readily usable in a stock build.

Valve faces can be touched up on a refacer, lifters can be reground; pistons don't rust, but the corrosion, if not too bad, can be blown off with a wire wheel.

jack vines

52-fan
07-09-2015, 09:53 PM
The heads of the valves I looked at were not rusty, but the stems had spots of rust. The lifters have a light coat of rust over most of the surface. I thought about trying some fine steel wool on a few pieces to see what would happen. Some parts are for a V-8 and some for sixes. Some of the V-8 pistons are flat tops.

Corvanti
07-09-2015, 10:10 PM
if just a little surface rust and not pitted on the valves, maybe some of this and cleaning/polishing would help? or at least see what's left...

http://www.evapo-rust.com/

njonkman
07-10-2015, 10:16 AM
Yes Evapo-Rust is the way to go. I have been making it in Canada for many years (now retired) and have cleaned all my parts with it when restoring my 56 Champion. Even the door bottoms stood in Evapo-Rust for a couple of days to get the rust out of the seams. All my electrical got cleaned that way, starter, generator, regulator, relays, distributor etc.
Nick

52-fan
07-10-2015, 10:37 AM
Sounds like that could be handy to have around. Joe says the O'reilly where he works has it in stock.

Commander Eddie
07-10-2015, 11:43 AM
That sure beats a hot solvent tank. Too bad it only works on rust. I may have to try some of that stuff.

53k
07-10-2015, 05:46 PM
The heads of the valves I looked at were not rusty, but the stems had spots of rust. The lifters have a light coat of rust over most of the surface. I thought about trying some fine steel wool on a few pieces to see what would happen. Some parts are for a V-8 and some for sixes. Some of the V-8 pistons are flat tops.
A little steel wool and some elbow grease can do wonders. Back in 1970 or so I bought a wrecked '64 R-1 Avanti (for $150). The hood was destroyed in the accident so the engine was open to the weather and the air cleaner was gone. I pulled the engine and started tearing into it. When i got the heads off the cylinders were full of water and the walls were rusted. I had the car in the base auto hobby shop. The man running the shop took a look and told me get some steel wool and kerosene and start rubbing. I did and the cylinders cleaned up just fine. I didn't even check the valve guides or lifters, just put it back together, dropped it in my 8E7 to replace the worn out 259. I drove it for many thousands of miles with no problems, pulled a 3800 pound travel trailer from the San Francisco Bay Area to Seattle then east to Boston by way of Yellowstone and other places.

TWChamp
07-11-2015, 08:33 PM
I agree that the parts need to be cleaned and put to use. Car parts need to be pure junk before I toss them, and even then many people use such parts to make yard art, so they still shouldn't be junked. I saw a very nice yard chair made from 4 bad Model A wheels, and I'll do the same as soon as I find one more junk wheel.

Dan Timberlake
07-12-2015, 09:55 AM
Certainly many parts can be cleaned and used with no issues.

One thing I consider for highly stressed engine and chassis parts is the surface finish in high stress areas. Crank journal fillets, much of the connecting rods, parts of the piston, valve head>stem transitions, etc.
It doesn't take much surface degradation to clobber the endurance/fatigue strength, which determines how many stress cycles the part will endure before fatigue cracks initiate, which is the beginning of the end.

Page 73 here -
http://www.timken.com/zh-cn/Knowledge/engineers/handbook/Documents/Practical_Data_Metallurgists(4023)-Sept06.pdf