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paul shuffleburg
06-29-2015, 01:23 AM
Did Studebaker produce any vehicles with a 289 in 1959 and if
not, why?

Skip Lackie
06-29-2015, 06:45 AM
All 1959 V8 trucks except the Scotsman models came with 289s as standard equipment. That was the only year that happened. In addition, as noted in the V8 engine number table, there have long been rumors that a few cars were built with 289s for special customers or police departments. I don't know if there is any firm evidence to the latter.

The theory is that the company was trying to ride the wave of interest in economy cars triggered by the Nash Rambler and wanted the best possible gas mileage in all of its models.

BobPalma
06-29-2015, 06:52 AM
:) What Skip said.

Another factor was simplifying production for 1959. It might not seem to be much of a big deal to produce 259s and 289s at the same time, and it isn't, but every little bit to simplify production realities and scheduling was important in 1959 to keep up with the demand for the Lark, thankfully.

That is also, undoubtedly, why they decided to not offer two-tone paint schemes in 1959. The early 1959 full-line brochure shows a Tahiti Coral 1959 Lark Regal 4-door with a white roof, but two-tones were obviously nixed before regular 1959 production commenced. ;) :cool: BP

JRoberts
06-29-2015, 07:33 AM
I am not surprise that the 1959 Larks only came with the 259 V8, but I would have thought the Hawk would have had the 289 at least as an option.

56H-Y6
06-29-2015, 08:34 AM
Hi

The 1959 marketing approach was to emphasize economy of operation and the 259 ci V8 perceived to project that purpose better than the 289 ci V8 would. Its doubtful the larger engine turned in significantly poorer gas mileage when driven in the same manner. Why the 289 wasn't simply an optional engine is a mystery, certainly there were many loyal customers who preferred that engine.

The other peculiar marketing decision for those first Lark years was the inclusion of the Y-body 113" wb sedans in production but then restrict them only to Econ-O-Miler taxi sales. Most likely when Mr. Egbert came aboard, reviewed the plans for 1961, questioned why the Y-body was so under-utilized and not in the general product line, the 1961 Lark Cruiser was born.

Steve

StudeRich
06-29-2015, 04:59 PM
/Cut/The other peculiar marketing decision for those first Lark years was the inclusion of the Y-body 113" wb sedans in production but then restrict them only to Econ-O-Miler taxi sales. Most likely when Mr. Egbert came aboard, reviewed the plans for 1961, questioned why the Y-body was so under-utilized and not in the general product line, the 1961 Lark Cruiser was born.Steve

Very Good hindsite Steve! And if you remember what Sherwood looked like, if he ever sat in the backseat of a"W" Body, bread and butter Lark Sedan, he definitely would have said: lets stretch this thing! :)

6hk71400
07-12-2015, 12:50 AM
Trivia question: what is a unique characteristic of the 1959 V8 engine block? I know just checking to see if anyone else knows.

Bob Miles
Tucson AZ

mbstude
07-12-2015, 01:07 AM
Trivia question: what is a unique characteristic of the 1959 V8 engine block? I know just checking to see if anyone else knows.

Bob Miles
Tucson AZ

It has a bunch of ridges by the valley pan.

6hk71400
07-12-2015, 02:44 AM
You are correct Sir! I don't know why they did it for that year, but it does make a great conversation point when looking at the engine and also helpful other than the engine id to spot a 59 block in another year car.

Bob Miles
Tucson, AZ

8E45E
07-12-2015, 08:03 AM
I am not surprise that the 1959 Larks only came with the 259 V8, but I would have thought the Hawk would have had the 289 at least as an option.

Reportedly, Studebaker wanted to drop the Hawk line altogether for 1959, but it was dealer insistence that at least one model of the Hawk was kept available.

Craig

retrostude
07-12-2015, 10:22 AM
Yes in 59 the Milwaukee police dept revised their order specs to permit Nash Rambler (a local company) to bid on new police cruisers. However the plan backfired when Studebaker submitted a lower bid with better performance, and Studes wound up dominating the fleet in the early 60s. How do I know? My grandfather Howard Johnson was the chief of police there from 1957-64. He's the big guy at the rear in dress blues in the pic... yes gramps said they all ran 289s with WCFBs and they were lowest cost per mile the department had ever owned.

StudeRich
07-12-2015, 11:18 AM
You are correct Sir! I don't know why they did it for that year, but it does make a great conversation point when looking at the engine and also helpful other than the engine id to spot a 59 block in another year car.

Bob Miles
Tucson, AZ

Bob, I think you will find with more research that only the Blocks from that ONE Mold had the Ribs, not all.
Also it was not only used in '59, my Original '58 President has them, and there may have been a few 1960's.

For some strange reason we have not proved, I have had 4 of those blocks and every one got a Rod knock at about 40-50,000 Miles, and one '59 had it happen 3 times! I threw away 3 of them thinking maybe the cylinders were not properly aligned.

Skinnys Garage
07-12-2015, 11:18 AM
Yes in 59 the Milwaukee police dept revised their order specs to permit Nash Rambler (a local company) to bid on new police cruisers. However the plan backfired when Studebaker submitted a lower bid with better performance, and Studes wound up dominating the fleet in the early 60s. How do I know? My grandfather Howard Johnson was the chief of police there from 1957-64. He's the big guy at the rear in dress blues in the pic... yes gramps said they all ran 289s with WCFBs and they were lowest cost per mile the department had ever owned.I have one of those Milwaukee Marshals. Check this thread out to see another photo of your Grandfather. http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?22720-60-Marshal-Updates

Stude-Preferred
07-12-2015, 07:19 PM
Hi: A fellow Lark lover.....
I like hearing historical Studebaker tails. So I enjoyed retrostudes comments from his Grandfather.

The Milwaukee Larks appear to be 1960 vs. 1959.
Ways to decode: Tail Light design with rounded edge, Lark VIII front fender script vs. just saying Studebaker. The other way to tell is being blocked by the Policeman.
In '59 the side trim "step-up" located by the rear side window was a 2 piece design. In 1960 is was smoother 1 piece stamping.
Also by 1960, the 289 was available for auto production.

Keeping Studes alive....
Stude-Preferred

StudeRich
07-12-2015, 08:16 PM
Hi: A fellow Lark lover.....
I like hearing historical Studebaker tails. So I enjoyed retrostudes comments from his Grandfather.

The Milwaukee Larks appear to be 1960 vs. 1959.
/Cut/Also by 1960, the 289 was available for auto production.
Keeping Studes alive....
Stude-Preferred

Yes the Police Cars are 1960 he says they were ordered in 1959, next year's New models I am sure you remember came out in Sept. of the prior year.

The 289 Engine was not available to the public for "normal" Lark VIII order until 1962, there were only a handful of special ordered Cars for "Special" people among the "Public" who got 289's in Standard Larks in '59-'61, but as has been said ALL V8 Trucks had them in '59 and of course the 289 became an Option only on '61 cruisers and Standard on 1960 to 1964 U.S. built Hawks and '62-'64 Cruisers.

When you ordered these or got a 289 Standard, Studebaker made sure you had Strong Brakes; (11"F, 10"R Finned Drums) and a Dana 44 Rear Axle to handle it.

6hk71400
07-12-2015, 10:25 PM
Thanks for the update on the engine mold. I only thought it was the 59 blocks that had the fins on the area around the valley cover. It is interesting that there was the rod problems also. Glad it was sorted out after 60 as the hi performance models would have suffered as a result

Bob Miles
Tucson AZ

Studebakercenteroforegon
07-12-2015, 10:41 PM
Thanks for the update on the engine mold. I only thought it was the 59 blocks that had the fins on the area around the valley cover. It is interesting that there was the rod problems also. Glad it was sorted out after 60 as the hi performance models would have suffered as a result

Bob Miles
Tucson AZ
I don't think we can positively conclude that the '59 V-8 engines had unusual rod bearing problems, cast ribs along the valley cover or not. Maybe StudeRich just had some unfortunate coincidental experiences. I have owned and driven many '59s with no such issues.

mbstude
07-12-2015, 10:47 PM
I don't think we can positively conclude that the '59 V-8 engines had unusual rod bearing problems, cast ribs along the valley cover or not. Maybe StudeRich just had some unfortunate coincidental experiences. I have owned and driven many '59s with no such issues.

I agree. I drove a '59 Hawk a couple of weeks ago with one of those ridged blocks. I guess I should feel lucky that it held together. :)

StudeRich
07-13-2015, 01:16 AM
I don't think we can positively conclude that the '59 V-8 engines had unusual rod bearing problems, cast ribs along the valley cover or not. Maybe StudeRich just had some unfortunate coincidental experiences. I have owned and driven many '59s with no such issues.

Yeah But, did they ALL have ribbed Blocks?