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Mrs K Corbin
06-16-2015, 07:07 AM
yesterday, I hit a couple body shops for estimates (Names withheld)

All I really want is to knock the dents out, add the filler, prime and paint with a good quality paint, not the Cheap stuff.. Keep this in mind.
The whole bottom and frame is in POR-15 as well as the insides of the fenders and engine bay of the truck. the bed is off, as was everything else (cab, fenders, engine)before I painted the bottom and re-installed it over a freshly painted frame/running gear. It even wobbles around the yard.

Shop#1 was a collision and restoration shop. I had asked for an estimate as I assume that generally the cost in the end is at least 25% above that, but I need a ballpark of some sort anyway.... The shop manager stated that they only do $50/hour on restorations for reason of being a restoration and what you can get involved in.
He then proceeded to give me some examples, including a 62? GT Hawk that apparently the owner is into this car for $55k at this point and it's just now getting the doors, etc put back on for the final time (final paint is done, just reassembly needed), no interior, etc.
HELLO! Where are the TV Cameras? Am I being Punked?

Shop#2, I've dealt with before on more modern stuff.
The long story short is that I was told to bring it back when I'm a little further along and the doors and fenders are replaced with NEW....
Can anybody tell me where to get a set of NEW C-Cab Doors and Fenders? Aint happenin.....

So, I guess I'm still searchin.
Or Screw em, I'll end up doin it myself, however, I'm getting too old for this crap.

It's no wonder, everybody's either goin Rat-Rod, or dumpin them on Fleabay....

I was expecting to spend $1500 just to paint the cab (inside and out), front fenders, hood and a couple wheels.

Geesh, what's a CASO to do??

swvalcon
06-16-2015, 07:17 AM
If your looking for a $1500 paint job you will have to go Maco. Even then anybody work will run the bill way up. They charge big time for dents and body repair to off set their cheap paint work. Just from what your listing I would say your looking at $5000-10,000 depending on what you expect it to be when done.

DEEPNHOCK
06-16-2015, 07:27 AM
Welcome to the 1980's.....

52-fan
06-16-2015, 07:33 AM
Shop charges are out of sight these days. I am going to try painting my car myself, but it may never get past the primer stage. Sometimes I think a poor boy like me should just sit on the bank and fish.

Mike Van Veghten
06-16-2015, 07:44 AM
Years ago, YEARS ago...
I talked to a couple of shops about painting my 1950 Anglia. I told them that the car was about the size of a VW, simillar shape. I wanted two colors, the type paint didn't matter.
Out of three quotes, I took it to a shop that did very nice work on my girlfriends car (69 Z-28).

When I pulled up with it on the trailer, the guy says...it's a "race car"...!? I said, yea, "what difference does that make" ? New quote...almost double the original quote, that wasn't cheap to start with..!
Go figure...he had no explanation of nearly doubling the price. AND...mind you, I had done all of the body work myself. Just sand, seal and paint. No fancy prime, block sand, prime, block sand, four more times... JUST a simple paint job.

A long story short, I found a place on the way home that day, that ended up doing the work for about half the original shops quote, and the guy did a great job, with quality paint. This was back in about 1972, the car STILL has the original paint on it (nothing new over it !), and still looks somewhat presentable.
This guy normally did "big rig" trucks and was happy to do something small...

So yea...get used to it.

Mike

sweetolbob
06-16-2015, 08:34 AM
The only other thing you can do is ask around at the local auto shows for recommendations on folks that will work on it in their spare time. There are a couple of folks locally that augment their income by moonlighting doing paint and body work. Realistically, they would rather do paint so the heavy lifting on body work is best done buy the owner.

On the other hand, if you had a shop and fed your family with the proceeds, I'll bet you wouldn't take restoration work other than time and materials. Firm quotes on restoration work only happen on "reality" shows.

Good luck, Bob

royvaldez
06-16-2015, 08:41 AM
Take it to a local college or high School who have a body shop program.

57pack
06-16-2015, 08:49 AM
Take it to a local college or high School who have a body shop program.

Just what I was thinking! Our local community college has an auto body shop / class. They may take a few moths but the instructors there make sure the job is done right.

BRUCESTUDE
06-16-2015, 11:01 AM
I painted my car a couple years ago, and besides the endless hours of prep work, the materials cost over $2000.00! Since then I have found that most auto body paint stores have access to cheaper brands, that I'm sure spray on just as nice, at least for us amateurs.
I was going to suggest what sweetolbob referred to; see if any body and paint employees moonlight, especially now during the "off" season (at least in areas that have snow and ice in winter).

dean pearson
06-16-2015, 11:46 AM
You need to just find a guy.

I have one in mind for my car and its still going to cost a few thousand but he's just the guy that painted our work trucks and he painted the hood on my bosses dodge truck.
It all looked pretty good.

I'm going original color and want it to look original. Paint jobs in 1952 weren't all that fancy.

Just my 2

Dean

Mike Van Veghten
06-16-2015, 12:28 PM
Um...just a heads up, be carefull of the schools work.
It's about 50/50 from what I've seen...good work to, do it over work.

An actual painter "outside" of his normal work days is a better deal from my experience. But it also can take a while. After all, he IS working on his days/hours "off"..!

Mike

GeneC
06-16-2015, 12:42 PM
I have always painted my own and found the key is a supplier that is willing to discuss what your situation is, for example, on my Lark, I told them doesn't have to be the best stuff, but good and durable for a home done job, he had a recomendation that was about 1/3 the price of the stuff the local restoration shop uses.  Sprayed great doing the trimming, will be used on the whole car as soon as it is back together.  Basically is was a gen 1 ppg base/clear.  He said this particular generation also allowed me to shoot some of the less expensive primers, etc, so will save me a ton on the whole job.

I would talk to a local auto body supply store, not a parts store that sells paint, but the stores that supply the pro's tell them you are looking for someone to shoot the thing is stages, that is easy to work with, whatever else you need, tell them the big shops scared you off, they will probably have a name or 2 for you. I know my local suppliers would.

Big shops that do not call themselves "Restoration" shops do not want old stuff, especially the shops that are doing insurance work, they take too long, the owners are too picky.  Some shops don't want to spray over other peoples body work, so what you need is a either a small shop that likes the old time stuff, or a guy doing it on the side.  Just make sure you do not end up with someone that takes the truck or parts in and never seems to get them done!  Seen that before!

StudeRich
06-16-2015, 12:58 PM
.  .  . 

I have seen computer typed info displayed incorrectly this way before. How does it happen, Why?

Mrs K Corbin
06-16-2015, 01:18 PM
Yep, seems that all they want is to remove a panel, put some cheap Mexican/chinese panel on there, squirt some paint at it and charge your insurance $3k.....

nobody seems to want to do hammer and dolly work anymore without big$$$$$

Guess I'm in the Studebaker Body business.

j.byrd
06-16-2015, 01:26 PM
Mrs K Corbin, I just sent you a private message w/ a possibility...good luck, jb

prez55
06-16-2015, 06:16 PM
Cheapest price for the do it your selfer is to decide on brush or roller.

48skyliner
06-16-2015, 08:28 PM
"nobody seems to want to do hammer and dolly work anymore without big$$$$$":

I am not sure that is a new concept - I found a couple of repairs on my 48 Stude that just blew me away. Some guy, presumably a professional bodyman since he knew how to use lead, did not even take the time to hammer the damage roughly back to shape. He just covered it up with lead, sanded it smooth and painted it. I assume this was done back in the 40s or 50s, since Bondo would be much easier to do. I melted away the lead, used a hammer and dolly, a few minutes work, checking it to the opposite side with a profile gage and I am sure there is no more than 1/16 inch of body filler when I was done.

When the time comes for paint, I recommend you look at this web site: http://www.shop.thecoatingstore.com/UreTop-Urethane-Single-Stage_c11.htm

I have painted four cars and a motorcycle with their basecoat/clearcoat urethane, plus my Studebaker which was sprayed by my local painter. I am quite happy with the quality of the paint and the service. For your needs, I suspect the single stage paint (no clearcoat) would be suitable.



44867 44868 44869

alaipairod
06-16-2015, 10:22 PM
I am so happy that so many Studebaker guardians are willing to take the time and money to preserve their rides.
You have to set the level of restoration on your project at the onset.
There are many qualified and HONEST shops that are willing to work with your budget.
The bottom line is....Do you want a nice reliable good looking ride that draws attention.....Then don't complain when you show it at a local show and your car gets ignored by the Judges. The paint quality is one of the serious looks from the Judges.............

conrad01
06-16-2015, 10:44 PM
find a kid going to body shop school. If you find the right kid he will be happy to get a passing grade and some cash in his pocket.

jackb
06-17-2015, 07:56 AM
basically what we're reading is you make the crap shoot with someone learning or a do-it-yourself job. Now the reality check: it costs about the same to paint a non-Stude vehicle as a Stude. Shop prices reflect the other marques and their relative value(s)...... enter the Stude "quasi"-survivor and drive the +*&# out of it.....

Commander55
06-17-2015, 08:40 AM
.* .* .*

I have seen computer typed info displayed incorrectly this way before. How does it happen, Why?

It might mean "No Bull $#!t Please!"

But more than likely it is the entity used in HTML to represent a non-breaking space. It is essentially a standard space, the primary difference being that a browser should not break (or wrap) a line of text at the point that this   occupies.

Mrs K Corbin
06-17-2015, 10:45 AM
2 more shops down.....

I've pulled the truck off the frame. Blasted everything and I do mean everything!. POR-15 frame and bottom of cab, inside the fenders, inside the engine compartment.
it's back on the frame and the engine is back in. bed is still off.
The body is in DP-60 and the welding is done.
I just need a good dolly and hammer man and then some mud and paint....

PackardV8
06-17-2015, 01:02 PM
The guy who painted my truck is an artist, but he only does hobby cars as a favor to friends. Collision work is just so much more profitable, new parts are easier than "good dolly and hammer" and the customers are easier to deal with.

jack vines

6hk71400
06-17-2015, 01:13 PM
If you can find someone through word of mouth that is a former body shop owner that wants to just work at his own pace, that might be the way to go. Peter in Tucson gave up his shop because of the overhead and just works on a cash basis for $20.00 an hour. All lead work and dolly and hammer. He knows where to farm out paint work the same way and you provide paint and the cost is just for labor.

Ask other car guys around and see if you can strike a deal for not much gold.

Bob Miles
Tucson Az

wittsend
06-17-2015, 01:58 PM
Here is an article on a Corvair painted with a roller and under $10 a quart Rustolium. Best part is he has three years of updates on how the paint held up. http://www.rickwrench.com/index79master.htm?http://www.rickwrench.com/50dollarpaint.html

Frankly after dealing with peeling clear coat on just about all of the 1980's and up cars we've had (including our 2010 Honda Civic!) I'd much rather have a single stage paint. You can't buff out peeling clear coat like you can oxidized single stage. The original paint on my Turbo Pinto is 42 years old. And you can bet they didn't use any special paint on that. Regardless, most of the sides of the car polish/wax up rather nice (the top surfaces suffered from wet debris).

Most of my cars have the "survivor / arrested decay" paint. I wet sand them and then buff them out. Chips, scrapes, dents press out as best I can and half the people seemed to admire the survivor effort and others say, " It will look real nice when you finish it." But, I'll bet you even if I paid $2K-$3K for a decent paint job they would probably just find flaws with it. Me, I' d rather have another $2K car.

Here is the buffed out car. The paint was peeling too much on the roof so it got a coating of rattle can semi gloss black. If you look at the (missing) trim section I used red oxide primer. Not a match, but it does fill in the scrape. The area had a rather large dent. I found appropriate shaped rocks in the yard and used a jack to press it out. The paint, buffing compound and wax was all from the cities toxic waste recycle center (free). So, to answer your question, "What it a CASO to do?", well..., do that. :)

Bob Andrews
06-17-2015, 03:35 PM
No offense to wittsend, but you're talking about a different thing. The things you mentioned brush, roller, Rust oleum, rattle can, cobbled up repairs are okay if that's good enough for an individual. The things you mentioned brush, roller, Rustoleum, rattle can, cobbled up repairs are okay if that's good enough for an individual. But a quality, decent looking job is a completely different thing. Yes, I know, people roll and brush paint vehicles and convince themselves it looks good. But in reality, it destroys any value a vehicle might have otherwise had.

karterfred88
06-17-2015, 04:12 PM
2 more shops down.....

I've pulled the truck off the frame. Blasted everything and I do mean everything!. POR-15 frame and bottom of cab, inside the fenders, inside the engine compartment.
it's back on the frame and the engine is back in. bed is still off.
The body is in DP-60 and the welding is done.
I just need a good dolly and hammer man and then some mud and paint....

OK-Time to learn some good old hammer and dolly work !!It's not that hard, but takes a lot of time. You'll soon know why they charge so much, but you can do it. Get some old time books on auto body repair from the library, start with the smallest easiest to- get-to dent, that has access to the backside. Get it close then try using some "bondo" to finish, then do it again till it looks right with primer. Get a rattle can and spray the area and look at it from every angle--when happy-spray primer over it and go to the next. The "art" of hammer and dolly/off dolly is disappearing, I watched it over a 40+ year career as an insurance appraiser. If you can fix the dents to your satisfaction and have them all in prime, then go to MAACO, let them shoot it in the least expensive single stage--about $300.00. Take it home re-examine it and find the flaws. Fix the flaws, re-sand and take back and have it reshot with the better job. You'll be happy with it. Unless you have someone who loves you or the vehicle, you won't find what you are looking for, at what you can afford. Good luck !!

bezhawk
06-17-2015, 04:15 PM
They found out how copper wire was invented......it was two CASOs fighting over a penny!

Dick Steinkamp
06-17-2015, 06:58 PM
They found out how copper wire was invented......it was two CASOs fighting over a penny!

......:!!:.....

53commander
06-17-2015, 07:20 PM
No offense to wittsend, but you're talking about a different thing. The things you mentioned brush, roller, Rust oleum, rattle can, cobbled up repairs are okay if that's good enough for an individual. The things you mentioned brush, roller, Rustoleum, rattle can, cobbled up repairs are okay if that's good enough for an individual. But a quality, decent looking job is a completely different thing. Yes, I know, people roll and brush paint vehicles and convince themselves it looks good. But in reality, it destroys any value a vehicle might have otherwise had.

When I was a younger lad a neighbor of ours had an old Corvette in their garage and one day while delivering newspapers I decided to take a closer look. It was painted blue and white in no particular pattern with a brush. I had to ask and the owner said he was given the car and never planned to fix it up so he just covered it in paint so it wouldn't rust. You just cant make this stuff up.

alaipairod
06-17-2015, 09:27 PM
IF YOU DEFINE YOURSELF AS A PROUD "CASO"............Just remember that there are a bunch of "Proud Guardians of Studebakers" that will take the time and money to make their ride correct to the car's period, and show it proudly........PGoS..............

CJMiller
06-17-2015, 09:51 PM
I've found the best way is to go on a first date and see what happens. Don't go in saying "I want all the bodywork done and the car painted." Instead, pick a fender and have them do the bodywork and put it in primer on just that fender. That gives you a chance to see their work, and it gives them a chance to get comfortable with the car. If you're both happy, then go on a second date-- pick another fender and have them do that next. If you're not happy with their work all you're out is a couple hundred and you can move on to another shop.

The funny thing is, it'll be the body shop that wants to do more, and they'll suggest that "as long as we're doing that let's do this, this, and this while we're at it." And their prices will come down in the process.

I just did it with my Lark. I tried a new shop, and I had them paint my dash. I explained that there was no way I was taking a convertible off the street in the summer, but do the dash and we'll talk about the other things in the Fall. They did a nice job and priced it fairly, and I think they're a lot more comfortable with me because I removed the dash from the car, had it all ready for them, and let them know exactly what I wanted. When we talk again in the Fall we'll both be a lot happier than if I showed up cold and said, "here, do the bodywork and paint this."

Bob Andrews
06-18-2015, 06:31 AM
I don't think that's a good plan; although it might be a test to see if a shop knows what it's doing. Knowledgeable shops would tell you that they would never finish bodywork and prime without having the vehicle to make sure it fits correctly.

Couple comments on the original post from someone with 40+ years in the business:

Of course, we are only hearing the OP's side of things, but based on what was written, I think the OP missed a tongue-in-cheek comment from shop #2. I am sure the shop is not expecting you to simply go and buy brand-new body panels. In my experience, there is probably a lot more to the conversation than what we see here.

As for shop #1- I have been here many times with folks. If you presented your job the way you did here talking about just knocking out dents, slapping on filler, and shoot, the shop picked up on the red flag that you don't really understand what this work entails to do properly. There is way more potential trouble involved than it's worth to take on a job from someone that presents looking solely for the lowest possible price. That's why they tried to give you an idea of how it works with the example of the GT. Believe me, that's not anything outlandish trying to shock you. And I can add that in this area, $50 an hour for that work is and exceptionally good price. They weren't trying to trick you, they were trying to give you an idea of the reality of doing it right.

On the subject of doing it right few people know what it really entails to do a proper job. Nothing wrong with that, it's not their field of study. It starts at with how the bare metal is treated and handled, and how it is coated. There is way more to metal prep than sanding/grinding and priming. If the steps are not known and followed properly, the result will be possible blisters, peeling, etc. of the finished product down the road. No shop can afford to put their reputation on the line putting their beautiful paint work over unknown prep, then being bad mouthed when it starts peeling a year later. This is why no decent shop will risk doing a cheapskate job not worth the trouble or possible bad rap.

In most cases, the shade tree restorer has two options: find another shadetree guy doing it on the side, or do it themselves. Regular production shops don't see much profit in restoration work as compared to collision work, and proper restoration shops only deal with those who let them do things properly.

I know that we would all like to think that the shade tree ways of doing it are doing it right, but they just are not. Try not to be frustrated with the shops that are not willing to take that risk.

8E45E
06-18-2015, 06:41 AM
They found out how copper wire was invented......it was two CASOs fighting over a penny!

And the Grand Canyon was formed by the third CASO who lost his penny down a gopher hole!

Craig

jimmijim8
06-18-2015, 09:00 AM
I like this idea but not for every one. Prep the car yourself and let Maco spray it. Talk with manager and ask of him to put his most talented spray man to work on your car. Meet the employee an offer a tip to him for his best effort. I saw a pickup painted for 1700. It looked real nice. Don't know if you would have the same outcome
OK-Time to learn some good old hammer and dolly work !!It's not that hard, but takes a lot of time. You'll soon know why they charge so much, but you can do it. Get some old time books on auto body repair from the library, start with the smallest easiest to- get-to dent, that has access to the backside. Get it close then try using some "bondo" to finish, then do it again till it looks right with primer. Get a rattle can and spray the area and look at it from every angle--when happy-spray primer over it and go to the next. The "art" of hammer and dolly/off dolly is disappearing, I watched it over a 40+ year career as an insurance appraiser. If you can fix the dents to your satisfaction and have them all in prime, then go to MAACO, let them shoot it in the least expensive single stage--about $300.00. Take it home re-examine it and find the flaws. Fix the flaws, re-sand and take back and have it reshot with the better job. You'll be happy with it. Unless you have someone who loves you or the vehicle, you won't find what you are looking for, at what you can afford. Good luck !!

karterfred88
06-18-2015, 09:55 AM
The missing item in all our responses, is, how long do you want and expect it to last? What do you hope it will look like when it's done? The old Earl Scheibs, Miracle Auto Painting Shops, Maacos etc. have made millions of customers happy with the CASO jobs they did. Also made some very unhappy! I've seen $10,000.00 paint jobs that looked like junk two years after winning prizes at a show, and 10 year old Earl Scheib jobs that people were still happy with. Sorry, cost and "correct" preparation, the best materials, best intensions, do not always produce what we expect from the amount spent. Remember-if it looks like junk you can always do it again!!

JRoberts
06-18-2015, 10:06 AM
Take it to a local college or high School who have a body shop program.

Around here high schools don't have such classes anymore I took a few Auto body classes several years ago and found out right away why prices are what they are. Our local technical community college stopped doing cars for people a long time ago. I think because owners did not like that it took too long and instructors got tired of unreasonable complaints.

Mrs K Corbin
06-18-2015, 10:36 AM
Of course, we are only hearing the OP's side of things, but based on what was written, I think the OP missed a tongue-in-cheek comment from shop #2. I am sure the shop is not expecting you to simply go and buy brand-new body panels. In my experience, there is probably a lot more to the conversation than what we see here.

As for shop #1- I have been here many times with folks. If you presented your job the way you did here talking about just knocking out dents, slapping on filler, and shoot, the shop picked up on the red flag that you don't really understand what this work entails to do properly. There is way more potential trouble involved than it's worth to take on a job from someone that presents looking solely for the lowest possible price. That's why they tried to give you an idea of how it works with the example of the GT. Believe me, that's not anything outlandish trying to shock you. And I can add that in this area, $50 an hour for that work is and exceptionally good price. They weren't trying to trick you, they were trying to give you an idea of the reality of doing it right.

On the subject of doing it right few people know what it really entails to do a proper job. Nothing wrong with that, it's not their field of study. It starts at with how the bare metal is treated and handled, and how it is coated. There is way more to metal prep than sanding/grinding and priming. If the steps are not known and followed properly, the result will be possible blisters, peeling, etc. of the finished product down the road. No shop can afford to put their reputation on the line putting their beautiful paint work over unknown prep, then being bad mouthed when it starts peeling a year later. This is why no decent shop will risk doing a cheapskate job not worth the trouble or possible bad rap.


Actually, I had the entire thing sandblasted and put in DP-60 and was expecting it to probably be removed and their own prep work done prior to paint, so that the paint quality is what they expect, not someone else's F'UP. Exactly why I didn't do the body work myself before taking it out there..
BUT if I do the body work, I'll paint it myself, which is what I'm probably gonna end up doing....

Mrs K Corbin
06-18-2015, 10:38 AM
Around here high schools don't have such classes anymore I took a few Auto body classes several years ago and found out right away why prices are what they are. Our local technical community college stopped doing cars for people a long time ago. I think because owners did not like that it took too long and instructors got tired of unreasonable complaints.

YOU ARE VERY CORRECT... The local auto body program at the Tech School isn't interested either.... They want to train their folks for production shops..... Simple.

jclary
06-18-2015, 10:55 AM
... got tired of unreasonable complaints.:(

Probably why so few businesses, of any kind, actively solicit this kind of work. Restoration work is a "wayside" niche of auto body repair. In the everyday business of repairing fender bender damage...the real money... is assured by insurance companies, and the materials are readily available with contemporary paint codes, easy obtained body panels, a few days work, the shop collects the money and the customer drives away.:)

Suppose you were a veterinarian...given the choice of treating poodles or a rattlesnake with a toothache...which one would you prefer?:eek:

The best business practice is to evaluate profitability and return on investment as it relates to profitability and survivability for sustaining its future.:)

In our hobby, you need to have deep pockets, or enjoy skinning knuckles, developing skills, sweating, and sometimes accepting less than professional results. Otherwise, you probably need to find another hobby.:cheers:

rusty65
06-18-2015, 10:58 AM
Perfect timing on this subject!I have a bit of a situation here, not necessarily paint-related, but trying to find a decent shop.I know I'm probably going to do the CASO/Maaco thing when that time comes.A few coats of Rustoleum "2X" rattle can had my car looking good for a few seasons.Here is what I'm looking for:

Short story long, it started when I decided to rewire my car.Scored a primo dash a couple of Yorks ago,so I thought I'd do the dash and harness as a pair.While I was tearing everything out,I thought I'd check on a CASO floorboard repair I did about 10 years ago.Ouch! Yuck! Rust city!I cut out,removed and scraped as much rust as I possibly could and came to the conclusion that ol'Sarah would need a floorpan, on the drivers side at least.

I ordered a drivers side floor pan and rocker panel from Classic Enterprises (Great service BTW).Simply stated, I need this welded in and put on in a professional manner.(I don't want to BS this part of the operation.)

So I'm looking for a shop to perform this service.Mind you, the electrics are pulled from the car and the interior is stripped out.The plan was to take a couple of large, hi-res photos of the car and go knocking on some doors.I have one restoration shop in mind recommended by my buddy Doug who has a neato '54 sedan.I just need the floorpan and rocker panel done and to make sure everything fits properly.The rest I'll do myself or farm it out at a later date.Any suggestions/advice?

Looking for a shop between Washington,DC and York,PA that won't have the car for 10 years or have it parted out for me,lol.
@Mrs K Corbin, thanks for opening up the door on this one and I'm sorry if I hijacked/derailed your thread.I didn't mean to.Just looking for a shop to do this work.I figured $100 an hour @ 10 hours=$1,000.(Not including the tow both ways;I got that.)
Looking for some guidance on this one.Will check this thread when I come home from work tonite.Thanks guys/gals!

Dick Steinkamp
06-18-2015, 11:05 AM
In our hobby, you need to have deep pockets, or enjoy skinning knuckles, developing skills, sweating, and sometimes accepting less than professional results. Otherwise, you probably need to find another hobby.

John,
This is SO true. The inability (or unwillingness) to pony up the necessary funds for a restoration, and/or the slow process and frustrations involved with learning and doing it yourself likely account for the large number of unfinished and abandoned projects out there. There is no way I know of to restore a vintage car without a big check book or extensive skills. Often BOTH are required.

rkapteyn
06-18-2015, 11:06 AM
It pays to bring your car to a shop that has several identical Studebakers under their belt.
They know where to get the parts and do not gobble up some welded together mess.
One shop that did many first place trophy cars is DeLuxe in West Chicago. 630 293 7750
The owner is a perfectionist that owns several Studebakers and knows them inside out.
He was advertising in Turning Wheels and has been a long time member of the SDC.

Robert Kapteyn

wittsend
06-18-2015, 12:39 PM
No offense to wittsend, but you're talking about a different thing. The things you mentioned brush, roller, Rustoleum, rattle can, cobbled up repairs are okay if that's good enough for an individual. But a quality, decent looking job is a completely different thing. Yes, I know, people roll and brush paint vehicles and convince themselves it looks good. But in reality, it destroys any value a vehicle might have otherwise had.

There are many perspectives to look at paint cost from. If you have a car that will value out at say $25,000 + then for sure it is prudent to spend $5,000 on a paint job relative to the cars value. But if you have a car with a relative value in the $1,000-$3,000 range even a $1,500 paint job seems out of perspective. Assuming few will look at the link, I've included before/after pictures of the $50 Rustolium Corvair paint job because the results are significant relative to cost. If the financial option was no paint or $50 of Rustolium and a man's time, I'd have to say it does not decrease the value - relative to the value of the car. Sadly most people who resort to rollering Rustolium don't follow through to obtain a decent result. And, I'd assume that is what most typically see with that type of painting. A link to the 3 year update if your enticed http://www.rickwrench.com/index79master.htm?http://www.rickwrench.com/50dollarpaint.html. Scroll to bottom then click on the update.