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Corvanti
03-21-2015, 06:32 PM
i used "search" but the closest thing i could find was for a OHV Lark 6.

the points on mine are supposed to be .020. the dwell meter is showing 34 at idle, 36 at any higher rpms. on the Lark, the dwell angle should be 38 - 40 degrees. would that be correct for the 170 flathead? i can't find any info in my '51 Manuals about dwell angle.

i don't think i've messed with points since the early 80's - didn't need to on the '40 and the Avanti had electronics.

other than pulling off the dist cap and checking out the points (contacts looked fine), i haven't tried to set them yet. if the 34/36 is ok, i'll go on to the next project.

the first car show of the season is next weekend and even with valve guide/seat problems (smokes quite a bit - i have another thread on that), i want to get her there!:)

appreciate any info!:!:

greyben
03-21-2015, 07:21 PM
The Motor's manual says 39 degrees and .020. If your meter is accurate the points are set a little too wide. It's more important to get the timing set correctly.

BobPalma
03-21-2015, 07:25 PM
:) Kerry: The first page in the electrical section of the 1950 Studebaker Shop Manual specifies the dwell angle at 38-40 degrees for Champions; 31-37 degrees for Commanders.

They refer to it as Cam Angle, which is an acceptable alternate name for Dwell Angle, although not frequently used any more. :cool: BP

Corvanti
03-21-2015, 08:07 PM
thanks all for the advice!:!:

BP: my Champion is a '51 (the late Tom Elliott's car). i checked my '51 Shop Manual and the "electrical section" starts at page 3!:mad: oh, and it's Kerry not Kelly - no worries, i've been called a lot worse.:lol:

i went ahead and checked the point gap and it was right on at .020... i think i may leave this alone for the coming week and get her ready for the car show festivities starting Friday afternoon.:)

BobPalma
03-21-2015, 08:38 PM
thanks all for the advice!:!:

BP: my Champion is a '51 (the late Tom Elliott's car). i checked my '51 Shop Manual and the "electrical section" starts at page 3!:mad: oh, and it's Kerry not Kelly - no worries, i've been called a lot worse.:lol:

i went ahead and checked the point gap and it was right on at .020... i think i may leave this alone for the coming week and get her ready for the car show festivities starting Friday afternoon.:)

'Sorry, Kerry; I just corrected your name in my post. I know your car is a '51, but I cited the 1950 Studebaker Shop Manual because I don't have a 1951 manual, knowing it was the same spec.

But just to be sure, I went out to my shop to consult my 1955 Motors' Manual and concur with greyben's findings therein; 39 degrees and .020 gap. (The 1955 edition goes back to 1940.)

'Good to know you are so carefully looking after Tom's pretty Business Coupe; congrats. :!: BP

jclary
03-21-2015, 09:19 PM
I've mentioned this before, but repeating won't hurt. When setting points, be sure to loosen the lock screw just enough to allow movement. I've found that backing the screw out too much can cause the setting to change when they are tightened down. Also, on today's replacement points, you might have to bend one or both contact bases to get them to "square-up" to each other. It is not rocket science, but this is one tiny adjustment spec that, if you miss it, only slightly, can really throw off smooth running of our engines.

r1lark
03-22-2015, 07:20 AM
the points on mine are supposed to be .020. the dwell meter is showing 34 at idle, 36 at any higher rpms.

IIRC, dwell should not change with rpm. If there is a change with rpm, doesn't that indicate possible looseness/issues inside the distributor (for example, too much clearance between shaft and bushings)?

TWChamp
03-22-2015, 10:07 AM
IIRC, dwell should not change with rpm. If there is a change with rpm, doesn't that indicate possible looseness/issues inside the distributor (for example, too much clearance between shaft and bushings)?

You are correct. It's highly unlikely, but points float would also change dwell. When I was 17 I accidentally connected battery power to the wrong side of the coil, and all that current flowing through the points took the temper out of the points spring. The points then stated to float at speeds about 40 MPH. This acted as an unwelcome governor to limit my speed. The old single cylinder gas Maytag washing machine engines governed the speed the same way. A flyweight would hold the points open when the right RPM was reached.