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lark55
02-17-2015, 06:30 PM
I am finally beginning to bring back my 63 Avanti to life after a 44 year sleep. I wanted to inspect the fuel tank using a digital inspection camera (bore scope) and see if there are any issues with rust or debris in the bottom of the tank. Has anyone attempted this and can it be done ? Are there baffles that would cause a problem? I took off the gas cap yesterday and there is still an odor of stale gas in the tank.I can take the bottom hose off and make sure there is no liquid in there.

64V-K7
02-17-2015, 07:17 PM
I just went through this with an 8 year old slumber and a half tank of old gas... The cheapest and most cost effective thing to do is remove the tank and treat it with a POR-15 tank sealing kit (~$80.00) Look at it this way... You have to replace the rubber lines anyway and chances are the sender is toasted from the condensation .... Getting the tank out is not a difficult process.

lark55
02-17-2015, 07:42 PM
Well that makes sense. I was under the impression that it was a real pain to remove the tank.

bezhawk
02-17-2015, 07:43 PM
Yes, the Avanti tank has 2 baffles in them, so it's sectioned in about 1/3 s. Often the lower elbow where the hose outlet attaches gets plugged from varnish. You take the hose off, and nothing comes out, so you think it's empty. Then you have to remove this elbow to get the tank out and stale gas goes everywhere.

lark55
02-17-2015, 07:53 PM
I guess I might be able to run a brass welding rod through the elbow to open it up.

Corvanti
02-17-2015, 10:35 PM
I did my gas tank with Por-15 products as Mr. Johnstone states above in Post #2. :!:

it was fairly easy to get the tank out thru the back seat area. easier if you have a power screwdriver to get all the screws out to get to it. once loose, i angled the tank to drain most of the gas below the bellows thru the bottom hose and was able to get her out to drain what was left.

if you don't have a "Service Manual" - get one!:)

lark55
02-17-2015, 10:42 PM
I do have the service manual I bought in 1979. I was just thinking that I should read up on removing the tank. Thanks for the advice guys.

sweetolbob
02-18-2015, 07:44 AM
The two tanks I've pulled would not come out until the 90 deg fitting on the bottom was removed. That's the gas shower Brad referred to in his post. It's a 1/4" NPT so it will screw out.

Bob

plwindish
02-18-2015, 10:49 AM
Three years ago I had the tank in my 76 pulled, cleaned and coated at a radiator shop I use. He also went over the outside of the tank soldering every spot weld for the baffles. Along with replacing the the entire fuel lines has eliminated any gas odors inside the cabin and there have been no issues with sediment in the carburetor.

TWChamp
02-18-2015, 10:57 AM
I need to clean the inside of my 50 Champion gas tank. I'm surprised that the fine red rust can get through my large clear fuel filter. The car sat for most of it's 20 years since it was restored, until I bought it 10 months ago and started driving it.

Hawklover
02-18-2015, 04:41 PM
After 50 years, this past November I replaced all the steel fuel line in my "64..........this included all the rubber hoses, except the one hose that goes up to the sail panel as a vent. Guess in 50 years from now if cars still exist the next owner can change that one out.

Xcalibur
02-19-2015, 01:57 PM
I would recommend saving yourself potential hassles down the road... take it out now, have it "boiled" out, look for pin-holes etc. See what you actually have, then decide what to do about it. All the best!!!

Stan.Gundry
02-19-2015, 10:53 PM
I agree that it needs to be thoroughly cleaned inside, whether by having a radiator shop boil it out, or soaking it for days with a super strong detergent solution followed by a solution that will dissolve rust, followed by filling it with gravel and rotating and shaking that around inside for an hour or so and then cleaning all of that out. Shaking the gravel around inside will break loose a lot of rust and crud that may still be left in there. The point is, there is more than one way to clean it out on the inside, but it must be cleaned out. Then, before you slosh the inside with some kind of fuel tank sealer/protectorant, on th outside solder a penny over every spot weld holding the interior baffles in place. The penny soldered in place gives an extra measure of strength and protection against rust through at the spot welds. I followed this procedure years ago, and it has held up over time even with the modern fuels.

karterfred88
02-20-2015, 10:50 AM
Looking through the various threads on the Avanti gas tank, I found out there is no longer a non-CASO method for tank replacement. At one time there was a vendor supplying stainless steel reproductions, but it seems they have disappeared. Has anyone, with an Avanti, found a company who already has the specs of the Avanti tank and can reproduce it in stainless? With all the alcohol in todays fuel, and it looks like it isn't going away any time soon, it seems like the best, if not the least expensive method, would be to replace all the fuel line and hoses with resistant materials that will last for our lifetime at least. Taking out the bazillion screws holding the panel behind the seatback in, is a chore-especially when they snap off and then there is the "resealing" of it which rarely gets done. My tank was resealed with some type of sealer, but now I can hear some stuff moving around when I tap the empty tank, so I know it needs to come back out. And the gage sender never gets to full, so if I have to take it out, I'd like to make the whole process the last time I'll need to do it.

bezhawk
02-20-2015, 11:16 AM
George Dimitsas still has the stainless tanks. It is not necessary to remove the tank or back seat to replace the fuel gauge sending unit. There is an access panel built into the rear bulkhead, behind the carpet.

karterfred88
02-20-2015, 11:27 AM
George Demitsas still has the stainless tanks. It is not necessary to remove the tank or back seat to replace the fuel gauge sending unit. There is an access panel built into the rear bulkhead, behind the carpet.
From what info I can find "Olympus Avanti" doesn't exist anymore, do you have direct contact info for George?

Bob Langer
02-20-2015, 12:00 PM
From what info I can find "Olympus Avanti" doesn't exist anymore, do you have direct contact info for George?

George still has ads in the Avanti Magazine. 773 486-6026.

Also new tanks are avaiable here. Scroll down.

http://avantiparts.biz/accessories-3/

Colgate Studebaker
02-20-2015, 06:55 PM
Definitely pull out the tank and get it cleaned and sealed. Some guys do it themselves, some get it done. I've had several tanks "boiled out" and then sealed with a teflon coating. Excellent results, and safe feelings about the effectiveness of the sealer. Bill

studefan
02-20-2015, 07:36 PM
Hawklover,

Where did you get the new steel fuel lines for your Avanti? I want to replace mine also.

Thanks

63r2
02-20-2015, 10:51 PM
I made my last 2 Avanti tanks.
Just remove the ends of the tanks and the baffles and get a sheet metal worker to roll you a new skin.
Weld together and seal the tank.
There is obviously a bit more to it but if you're handy then it can be done. I think the first one cost about $160AUD to make and the other was about $250AUD and that included the sealer.
It was the cheaper option than buying one in the US and shipping here.
pb
ps I changed the second tank to so I could run an intank fuel pump.

Hawklover
02-21-2015, 07:58 AM
Greetings to you in Virgina!......spent many moons in Fairfax!!
As to the fuel lines.........I purchased two full coils of Cunifer lines from Jon Myer, one for the tank to fuel pump, the second from the glass bowl back to the tank (vent line). Cunifer is an amazing material an amalgam of copper and nickle Very easy to work with. Also replaced every rubber line with FI spec'd hose and FI clamps, overkill, but I like overkill!:-)
Hawklover,

Where did you get the new steel fuel lines for your Avanti? I want to replace mine also.

Thanks

SN-60
02-21-2015, 08:02 AM
I agree that it needs to be thoroughly cleaned inside, whether by having a radiator shop boil it out, or soaking it for days with a super strong detergent solution followed by a solution that will dissolve rust, followed by filling it with gravel and rotating and shaking that around inside for an hour or so and then cleaning all of that out. Shaking the gravel around inside will break loose a lot of rust and crud that may still be left in there. The point is, there is more than one way to clean it out on the inside, but it must be cleaned out. Then, before you slosh the inside with some kind of fuel tank sealer/protectorant, on th outside solder a penny over every spot weld holding the interior baffles in place. The penny soldered in place gives an extra measure of strength and protection against rust through at the spot welds. I followed this procedure years ago, and it has held up over time even with the modern fuels.

That 'soldered penny over the spot welds' is a good old 'trick' Stan.....Thanks for sharing :!:

Hawklover
02-21-2015, 08:41 AM
20 yrs ago Jon Myer told me about those pennies, I did as he said.........no more tank weeping!
I agree that it needs to be thoroughly cleaned inside, whether by having a radiator shop boil it out, or soaking it for days with a super strong detergent solution followed by a solution that will dissolve rust, followed by filling it with gravel and rotating and shaking that around inside for an hour or so and then cleaning all of that out. Shaking the gravel around inside will break loose a lot of rust and crud that may still be left in there. The point is, there is more than one way to clean it out on the inside, but it must be cleaned out. Then, before you slosh the inside with some kind of fuel tank sealer/protectorant, on th outside solder a penny over every spot weld holding the interior baffles in place. The penny soldered in place gives an extra measure of strength and protection against rust through at the spot welds. I followed this procedure years ago, and it has held up over time even with the modern fuels.

bezhawk
02-21-2015, 09:20 AM
Pennies!!! Avantis are at least worth silver soldering silver dimes!

TWChamp
02-23-2015, 11:43 PM
Here's a link to a 1963 Avanti gas tank on ebay right now.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/STUDEBAKER-AVANTI-FUEL-GASOLINE-TANK-P-N-1555947-/281583310043?pt=Motors_Car_Truck_Parts_Accessories&hash=item418fac54db&vxp=mtr#ht_128wt_1238

Kenmike2
02-24-2015, 12:01 AM
Once again I must respond to a gas tank thread. GAS TANK RENU!!!
Find your nearest agent (GASTANKRENU.COM) and send your tank to them. The cold process treatments do not stay in place with the modern "alcohol" fuels due to the dramatic increase in their oxygen content. The cold process coatings were designed long before we had alcohol in our gasoline and the alcohol does really bad things to most of those coatings. In addition RENU agents can typically repair almost any extent of rust holes your tank may have (up to and including softball sized holes). And you won't need to solder pennies onto your tank. Their process results in a baked on PVC coating inside and out that they guarantee for the life of the owner. I have had several Avanti tanks done and they are the ultimate in reconditioned parts. No other process can match the finished quality of a Gas Tank RENU repair. I used to be their agent in AZ and even though I closed the operatiion due to low volume, I still swear by the process and send my tanks to other RENU agents to have them processed. I've seen the results of the cold process coatings and it ain't pretty. The coatings, when they start to release from the inside of the tank become floating contaminants and commence doing the very thing they are supposed to prevent.

lark55
02-24-2015, 09:37 AM
Once again I must respond to a gas tank thread. GAS TANK RENU!!!
Find your nearest agent (GASTANKRENU.COM) and send your tank to them. The cold process treatments do not stay in place with the modern "alcohol" fuels due to the dramatic increase in their oxygen content. The cold process coatings were designed long before we had alcohol in our gasoline and the alcohol does really bad things to most of those coatings. In addition RENU agents can typically repair almost any extent of rust holes your tank may have (up to and including softball sized holes). And you won't need to solder pennies onto your tank. Their process results in a baked on PVC coating inside and out that they guarantee for the life of the owner. I have had several Avanti tanks done and they are the ultimate in reconditioned parts. No other process can match the finished quality of a Gas Tank RENU repair. I used to be their agent in AZ and even though I closed the operatiion due to low volume, I still swear by the process and send my tanks to other RENU agents to have them processed. I've seen the results of the cold process coatings and it ain't pretty. The coatings, when they start to release from the inside of the tank become floating contaminants and commence doing the very thing they are supposed to prevent.

What is the typical cost of the RENU process?

lark55
03-19-2015, 04:52 PM
I removed the tank about ten days ago and it doesn't look too bad on the inside. It doesn't have much crud in it but does have a rust-like dust on the inside. I took it to a fellow who restores older cars and he also thought the tank looked good. He suggested taking it to a radiator shop to have it dipped and cleaned but they won't touch them anymore.The shop suggested using strong detergent then muriactic acid to treat the inside. Does anyone have any experience using the acid as far as mixing it with water, ie. the proportions, and will it affect the galvanized coating on the metal? Oh by the way, that tank stinks to high heaven and there was still about a quart in it when I took the tank out

64V-K7
03-20-2015, 06:40 AM
Go to a NAPA store and buy a POR-15 fuel tank kit, about $80.00. Works like a charm...