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View Full Version : Body to frame pads. gt hawk



hunter stanley
11-24-2014, 09:23 PM
Need specified how many body to frame pads I need for my car.
how many of each thickness.
thanks hunter

Studebakercenteroforegon
11-24-2014, 09:43 PM
Need specified how many body to frame pads I need for my car.
how many of each thickness.
thanks hunter

To quote the Chassis Parts Catalog....."as required"

hunter stanley
11-24-2014, 10:00 PM
what do you mean?

sweetolbob
11-24-2014, 10:01 PM
Need specified how many body to frame pads I need for my car.
how many of each thickness.
thanks hunter

On my 54K there was one rubber spacer per location as suggested above. The added spacing was done by steel shims. So the quick answer is one per and sufficient steel spacers to do the job. The steel spacers were the same shape shape as the rubber rectangles,

Not a clean answer but it should get you where you want to go. Bob

Studebakercenteroforegon
11-24-2014, 10:23 PM
what do you mean?

Meaning there is no specific quantity/thickness specified. Use whatever combination of thickness and quantities of pads to minimize binding and body twisting and insure that the doors fit as they should.

rockne10
11-24-2014, 10:26 PM
You will want a rubber insulator between each body bolt and frame but, once you've separated the body and frame and done any cleaning or repair, resetting those insulators and shims is going to depend on the total body alignment. How do the doors and fenders fit?
What I would do (what I did) is replace each insulator with a fresh one. These can simply be pieces of tire sidewall, as long as they are roughly of equal thickness. If you are fortunate, and have done fastidious repairs, no additional shimming will be necessary; final fitment adjustments can be accomplished with hinges and door strikers. Your front clip will be mounted without rubber and can be brought to alignment with simple solid shims and body washers.

48skyliner
11-25-2014, 12:19 AM
When we took the body off the frame of my 48 Champion, some of the shims were 1/4 inch, some 1/8 , but they were all crushed down to rock hard after 65 years. We did not try to keep track of which locations had the thicker shims. When we set the body back on the frame, some locations needed 1/8 and some 1/4 to fill the space. As we jacked it around to fit the shims, the body seemed to be pretty rigid. Reading the above, I realize we may have to make some adjustments when we fit the doors, which will be very soon.

As I described in my build thread, I had a roll of conveyer belt material,1/8 in thickness, and we used one or two shims as required. Drilling holes in the rubber can be tricky if you don't have the right drill, so I am showing a photo of the 1/2 inch drill I used. I know this style of drill has a name, but I don't know what it is called. It worked very well, just cut right through and left a nice neat hole.

39487 39488

junior
11-25-2014, 09:54 AM
Drilling holes in the rubber can be tricky if you don't have the right drill, so I am showing a photo of the 1/2 inch drill I used. I know this style of drill has a name, but I don't know what it is called. It worked very well, just cut right through and left a nice neat hole.

39487 39488

Looks like a brad point bit to me. cheers junior.

brian6373
11-25-2014, 10:15 AM
I used a hole punch. H.F. has a set for under 10 bucks that works very well.

jclary
11-25-2014, 10:20 AM
Even on original assembly lines, no matter how good the engineering, there is some artistic skill required for certain jobs. Body alignment and fitment is one of those jobs. No matter how exact the panel forming dies are made, tiny variances in temperature, humidity, and the amount of lubrication on the dies, can affect the dimensions of a part. Dowel pin wear, and pin locations on welding fixtures can move enough to cause enough difference in parts to require shimming, hammering, and bending to get correct alignment. That's why you will still see customized pry bars, two by fours, and even axe handles, deployed on assembly lines , by those charged with "getting it right."

For the restorer, it is a challenge, because it is usually a "one time" event. Unlike the assembly line, where there is usually a repetitive pattern, the restorer has to work a little harder to figure it out. An advantage to the restorer is that he can take his time and not have to battle "line speed" time constraints.

Mrs K Corbin
11-26-2014, 10:48 AM
Made mine out of M1 Abrams Inside Track Pads.....LOL
They were free, as they kept slinging out from under the tanks and landing on the road at Polk.

jimmijim8
11-26-2014, 10:51 AM
As long as the restorer has your blank check he will make it right no matter how long it takes. My guy will. cheers jimmijim