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View Full Version : Attractive and large Studebaker "special" magazine ad Daytona, Avanti



Studebaker Wheel
10-19-2014, 03:12 AM
Beside being a nice and attractive large format (20 X 13") magazine ad this one has some special significance. Does anyone know what it is?

38542

stude dude
10-19-2014, 04:13 AM
One of their best adds for '64. Not sure about special significance though....

Chris.

JRoberts
10-19-2014, 07:05 AM
Could it be the last ad for U.S. made Studebakers?

BobPalma
10-19-2014, 07:38 AM
:( Down in the corner it says Last LIFE ad. :cool: BP

Skip Lackie
10-19-2014, 08:15 AM
I have a copy of that ad framed and have been looking at it for years. The perspective is screwed up. The reflections in the window are wrong, there's no apparent sidewalk next to the Avanti, and the Avanti is running over that lady's left foot.

qsanford
10-19-2014, 08:28 AM
Is Sherwood Egbert one of the models ogling the Avanti on the Sidewalk?

8E45E
10-19-2014, 08:32 AM
:( Down in the corner it says Last LIFE ad. :cool: BP

Besides that, probably the last Studebaker ad to show an Avanti.

Craig

qsanford
10-19-2014, 08:35 AM
Could it have been the first ad. showing the Avanti with square headlights?

oltrknut
10-19-2014, 09:07 AM
I think the add is a photo of a print, I see a hand holding the add.

studefan
10-19-2014, 09:10 AM
Good eyes oltrknut. Is that a thumb that appears 3 times across the top?

qsanford
10-19-2014, 10:46 AM
Was the ad shot at the Administration Building in South Bend?

SScopelli
10-19-2014, 12:06 PM
No mention of Hawks..(taps):(



I have a copy of that ad framed and have been looking at it for years. The perspective is screwed up. The reflections in the window are wrong, there's no apparent sidewalk next to the Avanti, and the Avanti is running over that lady's left foot.

I believe the walking couple is on the other side of the glass, since they have no reflection in the window..

But the repetitive creepy thumb holding the photo is odd..
Tends to look like an early "The Factory" add from Warhol.

mrjazzmillcreek
10-19-2014, 01:17 PM
There were a series of double page adds in the Nov 63 Life magazines.Some featured the Wagonaire another the 64 Daytona convertible.I have them all

Studebaker Wheel
10-19-2014, 01:47 PM
Yes, it is the last South Bend production magazine ad that appeared in the December 6, 1963 issue of LIFE. That was three days before the announcement re the closing. Therefore it would also be the last Avanti ad. Congratulations to Bob P. for his powers of observation (obviously a man with too much time on his hands!). This was actually scanned from an original ad "proof" sent to dealers so it is printed on better quality paper stock and there is nothing on the back side to bleed through. As for the apparent "errors" in the reflections this is due to the artists mistakes since they are obviously not actual reflections.

StudeRich
10-19-2014, 05:44 PM
This also has to be one of the first Ads to carry the "Studebaker Automotive Sales Corp." Logo, prior Ads said Studebaker Corp.

Mr. Bill
10-19-2014, 06:53 PM
This is my favorite of all the "Different by Design" ads but I never thought about it being the last US ad. I should have though considering the publication date of the magazine. As far as the reflections in the window and other elements, I just thought of it as being "abstract". A little whimsy on the part of Studebaker and its advertising department.

Studebaker Wheel
10-19-2014, 07:16 PM
If this ad was one of a series, it would make a nice set to have prints reproduced. They would look great matted and framed!

Indeed it would!

Studebaker Wheel
10-19-2014, 09:12 PM
Here is another. This is actually pages 2-3 of a four page LIFE ad. Very unusual and expensive for that time. Not sure of date of issue but probably near the intro date. Goes to show how the company was going "all out" to try to get the '64 model year off with a bang. Unfortunately it did not work. This ad is similar but not the same as the one used on the outdoor bill boards. Some may recall that Standard Surplus had a good supply of these back in the 70s. There is one in the Studebaker National Museum near the "last" South Bend assembled car (the red Daytona).

38580

Skip Lackie
10-20-2014, 12:25 PM
Yes, it is the last South Bend production magazine ad that appeared in the December 6, 1963 issue of LIFE. That was three days before the announcement re the closing. Therefore it would also be the last Avanti ad. Congratulations to Bob P. for his powers of observation (obviously a man with too much time on his hands!). This was actually scanned from an original ad "proof" sent to dealers so it is printed on better quality paper stock and there is nothing on the back side to bleed through. As for the apparent "errors" in the reflections this is due to the artists mistakes since they are obviously not actual reflections.

Richard-
I realize that the intent of the original question was the date of the ad and its relationship to the announcement of the closing of the South Bend plant (and not the content or layout of the ad itself). And although I did know the date of the ad (I wrote it on my copy years ago), I did not make the connection that it was probably the last ad for South Bend-produced cars.

I also realize that a magazine ad is designed to grab the reader's attention for a few seconds and impart a few positive images -- and I believe this ad (and the other multi-page ads for 64 Studebakers) should have achieved that objective admirably. Magazine ads are not supposed to become the object of intensive scrutiny. But since I own examples of both cars pictured, I've had a copy of that ad hanging in my den for 20 years or so, and have had plenty of opportunity to examine it.

The overall layout is very good, and the breezy ad copy (typical of D'Arcy ad agency copy writers at the time) is very well done. But D'Arcy must've gone with the low bidder for the commercial art. The retoucher placed the Avanti (on the sidewalk?) right up against the building -- what happened to the sidewalk hinted at in front of the Daytona? And the couple standing next to the RF fender of the Avanti -- if they're outside the building, they're being squashed -- and if they're inside, how come the Avanti's reflection doesn't partly obscure them like it does all the other amorphous objects behind the glass?

Okay, okay -- I'm down in the weeds. I'll stop now. Thanks for posting anyway.

Studebaker Wheel
10-20-2014, 06:25 PM
Chalk it up to a rookie illustrator. Bet no one ever gave it a second look in 1963. Here's a composite of some of the others.

38593 38594

ddub
10-20-2014, 07:26 PM
Interesting that there are no Hawks shown.

Studebaker Wheel
10-20-2014, 08:32 PM
I do have one showing the Hawk. It was part of the four page model intro ad. It is shown below. Interesting they chose the dark green for the color. Note also the car has the accessory wire wheel wheel covers. I am also including the '64convertible ad. I believe that's all I have. If anyone has additional double page '64 ads I would like to see them.

3859638597

Jessie J.
10-20-2014, 09:11 PM
Here is another. This is actually pages 2-3 of a four page LIFE ad. Very unusual and expensive for that time. Not sure of date of issue but probably near the intro date. Goes to show how the company was going "all out" to try to get the '64 model year off with a bang. Unfortunately it did not work. This ad is similar but not the same as the one used on the outdoor bill boards. Some may recall that Standard Surplus had a good supply of these back in the 70s. There is one in the Studebaker National Museum near the "last" South Bend assembled car (the red Daytona).

38580

Look at those rear quarters. Talk about perspective being off! Looks like Advertising performed a 6" body 'sectioning' job and added about 2' of (non-existent) overhang.

BTW I like the proportions of my real '64 much more than these artistic renderings.

Studebaker Wheel
10-20-2014, 11:42 PM
Look at those rear quarters. Talk about perspective being off! Looks like Advertising performed a 6" body 'sectioning' job and added about 2' of (non-existent) overhang.

BTW I like the proportions of my real '64 much more than these artistic renderings.

That was a very common practice used as far back as the 1920s to make the cars look longer and lower. I have some ads that are almost comical they are so distorted.

BobPalma
10-21-2014, 07:36 AM
That was a very common practice used as far back as the 1920s to make the cars look longer and lower. I have some ads that are almost comical they are so distorted.

Agreed. :!:

It's difficult to imagine a more stretched and distorted "artist's rendering" than the Daytona convertible in the large 1964 brochure, Dick...unless it would be the Caribbean Convertible spread across two large pages of the 1956 Packard Senior Series brochure! ;) :cool: BP

Bill Pressler
10-21-2014, 11:13 AM
I always remember full-size Pontiac art ads in the '60's looking pretty ridiculous in the way they exaggerated width. They were neat anyway--usually in a neat 'setting'.

8E45E
10-21-2014, 02:59 PM
I always remember full-size Pontiac art ads in the '60's looking pretty ridiculous in the way they exaggerated width. They were neat anyway--usually in a neat 'setting'.

That is because two different artists did them, 'AF' for the Pontiacs, and 'VK' for the backgrounds!

Craig