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View Full Version : Wake me up when it's over... '57 GH progress



alaipairod
06-30-2014, 09:23 PM
35991 I knew it would be a rude awakening when we pulled the dash..........
35992

jclary
07-01-2014, 07:59 AM
Looks good to me!:)

Plenty of opportunity for fulfilling your desire to accomplish something!:!::cheers:

RDWEAVER
07-01-2014, 06:49 PM
Take lots and lots of pictures for reference.
Make sure you have the shop man. handy there is a wiring diagram in there you will need.
Make sure you don't get in a hurry.
And have some fun while you are doing this! I did.

alaipairod
07-01-2014, 09:15 PM
Take lots and lots of pictures for reference.
Make sure you have the shop man. handy there is a wiring diagram in there you will need.
Make sure you don't get in a hurry.
And have some fun while you are doing this! I did.

Truefully speaking we are having a love---hate relationship with 'Stanley'.
It is about the subtle surprises that make this resto challenging.
About half of the wireing in the dash is frayed or burned, I expected the worst and I got it.
Rust was another factor.......I coined the phrase, 'Never let it be said that Studebakers can't hold their water. Anybody that is selling a Studebaker that says it is 'Rust Free'......BEWARE........
As to the LOVE part of this project, seeing the progress, and the moon rising on the horizon gets my mood to a positive state of mind. 'Stanley' will be proud example of what the engineers envisioned.

jclary
07-02-2014, 09:15 AM
Truefully speaking we are having a love---hate relationship with 'Stanley'.
It is about the subtle surprises that make this resto challenging.
About half of the wireing in the dash is frayed or burned, I expected the worst and I got it....
....As to the LOVE part of this project, seeing the progress, and the moon rising on the horizon gets my mood to a positive state of mind. 'Stanley' will be proud example of what the engineers envisioned.

Your post got me to thinking (UH OH:rolleyes:) Therefore, don't take anything I write as me lecturing you about how you should approach your project, but rather, my thoughts as they have evolved regarding originality and restoration. :)

We see lots of posts of folks worried about "original" and trying to restore one to exact factory specs.:confused: However, if you think about it, like all other makes, Studebaker used contemporary methods of the day, and the goal was to make them as quickly as possible, cheap as possible, and maximize profit. When restoring one of these vehicles...why not do it better than the factory's "what we can get away with" minimum standards?

Wiring on the inside of the firewall and behind the dash is a good example. Our cars were built before the trend of "modular" assembly became popular. On our cars, there is no central "terminal/fuse block" for circuits. Instead, there is often a circuit breaker at the amp meter protecting the ignition switch. Off the ignition switch, other circuits are protected with in-line fuses. Other circuits are distributed off the light switch. Some of the light switches are protected with a circuit breaker or fuse. If all this bothers you, during restoration, you have an opportunity to "upgrade" by adding a central fuse block and branching off from there. It would be out of sight, and very convenient for future maintenance and troubleshooting. As us "older" owners die off, younger owners seem to get confused by the lack of "modular" components on these cars. But, if you take your time, and study the wiring schematics, you'll realize that the old method is really very simple. All the circuits are protected...just not at one central fuse panel.

My take is, do what is better, safer, and structurally sound. When rebuilding/restoring...if you see where thicker metal, additional bracing, better or additional fasteners, sound deaden-er, insulation, etc. will improve the vehicle...Go for it!

On your particular wiring harness, if you don't want the aggravation of building your own wiring, buy a complete new one from a number of our vendors who build them. Splicing and patching the old one will mean that you will restore a car and still have an old sketchy patched electrical system.

I totally understand the "Love/Hate" part...
I "love" to work on what I "want" to work on:!:...and "Hate" to work on what I "Have" to work on!:mad:

Chucks Stude
07-02-2014, 06:10 PM
Rust was another factor.......I coined the phrase, 'Never let it be said that Studebakers can't hold their water. Anybody that is selling a Studebaker that says it is 'Rust Free'......BEWARE........


You may have misunderstood the previous owner. What he was saying is "the rust is free", not what you thought you heard :whome:. I believe that has probably happened to all of us at one time or another.

alaipairod
07-02-2014, 09:15 PM
We cut out all of the rusted areas that we could and relpaced with fresh metal, and coated with POR 15.
Areas that were not rusted thru were wire brushed, primed, and coated with the same paint....Good stuff.
Yes there will most certainly be upgrades applied to the the car, primarily saftey and electrical areas.
But the original overall look will be as close as possible to the build sheet.
....There will be no concourse judging.....Been there and done that! My wife and I will take 'Stanley' to the local shows in CA, and a few cruise nights for the fun of it.

warrlaw1
07-03-2014, 10:01 AM
I built a driver, too. Used new wiring harnesses (dash forward, dash back) from our vendors with plastic insulated wires, coloured like the old woven stuff. Well worth price when you consider ease of installation and dependability down the road. Good luck.

Roscomacaw
07-05-2014, 09:32 AM
" Anybody that is selling a Studebaker that says it is 'Rust Free'......BEWARE........" observes alaipairod. If a seller asks for nothing extra with respect to the rust, then they're telling the truth that the rust is "free". - You pay for the car and the rust is free.