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View Full Version : Steering Installing new bushings in Upper A-Arm



Champion51
06-30-2014, 08:11 PM
Hi guys. I've noticed deterioration in the bushings of the upper inner A-Arm, in particular, the left side. Rubber is cracked and I think they should be replaced. Looking at their placement it doesn't look like an overwhelming job. But, is it? The manual makes it sound like a convoluted task requiring special tools etc.. The front-end shop will be doing the work. But before ordering the bushings, it would be nice to know how time consuming and/or difficult the job is.
Can anyone give me an idea? A big thanks in advance! (This is a '59 Silver Hawk)

Warren Webb
06-30-2014, 08:34 PM
Clark posted a great article in his blog on rebuilding the front end. A worthwhile read in my opinion. http://studeblogger.blogspot.com/2007/05/front-end-rebuild-pt-1.html

brian6373
07-01-2014, 09:13 AM
I bought a bushing driver tool, it looks like a "c" clamp. Sooo much easier than the shop manual method! It took me a half an hour to press out the old bushings and press in the new ones.

wwogg
07-01-2014, 03:16 PM
I used the same tool. Putting the new ones in was easy. Getting the old ones out...not so much. The mentioned front end rebuild article helped a lot.

JoeHall
07-01-2014, 04:29 PM
I bought a bushing driver tool, it looks like a "c" clamp. Sooo much easier than the shop manual method! It took me a half an hour to press out the old bushings and press in the new ones.
Brian, Could you post a pic of that tool? One of those just may go into my "must have" tools' box. Many of us have came up with make-shift means to get those bushings out, but if there's a tool out there specifically designed for the job, I'd like to at least take a look at it.

Thanks,
Joe

57pack
07-01-2014, 08:10 PM
I just completed changing all of a frame bushings in my Packard.
I took all four a frames to my local auto parts store who still have a machine shop.
They charged me $5.00 apiece to remove the old bushings and install the new bushings. I purchased the lower bushings from them but they couldn't locate the uppers.:rolleyes:

gordr
07-02-2014, 11:38 AM
I am looking forward to doing upper A-arm bushings on my '64 Lark convertible. Not fun. I have a set of Delrin bushings to install, but getting the old ones out will be the tough part. Here is what I plan to do. (car is on a 4-post hoist)
1. place jack stand under outer end of lower A-arm.
2. unscrew upper outer bushings.
3. remove bolts holding upper inner shaft to frame (may have to remove shock, but I have some oddball wrenches).
4. remove upper A-arm from car.
5. pry rubber out of bushings (one is gone already)
6. carefully use cutting torch to slit outer bushing shells, which lets them nearly FALL out
7. remove outer bushing shells, and inner shaft, taking care to mark which way it faced the frame
8. remove inner sleeves, which is usually easy
9. install new Delrin bushings, grease them, and put red Loctite on screws and tighten them (no preload issues with Delrin)
10. reassemble control arm to car, using spreader on outboard end when replacing outer bushings

That's the gist of it. Of course, I may find issues with wear in the outer bushings, or even the king pins, so sometimes the work multiplies itself.

brian6373
07-03-2014, 09:55 AM
Hi Joe, here's some pictures of the bushing driver tool that I have. 360093601036011 The only problem I had was the driver adapter isn't quite small enough to press out the upper inner bushing as easily as pressing the lower inner bushing was. Otherwise it still was a lot easier than using the shop press and having to use braces to keep the control arm from being distorted.

Brian

showbizkid
07-03-2014, 10:00 AM
Brian, that looks a lot like what I used as well. Not expensive; does the job!

swvalcon
07-03-2014, 11:39 AM
I've found to remove old bushings from A-arms a air chisel works great. Just get on the inside and hit it with the bit and they slide right out.

JoeHall
07-03-2014, 11:57 AM
Hi Joe, here's some pictures of the bushing driver tool that I have. 360093601036011 The only problem I had was the driver adapter isn't quite small enough to press out the upper inner bushing as easily as pressing the lower inner bushing was. Otherwise it still was a lot easier than using the shop press and having to use braces to keep the control arm from being distorted.

Brian
Thanks,
Having changed more than a few of those bushings, this looks like a "must have" on hand before tackling the next Stude front end. Despite proclamations each time I finish a Stude front end (that I will never do another one), there's always another one somewhere down the road.
Thanks Again,
Joe

brian6373
07-03-2014, 06:43 PM
I've found that a little heat from my map gas torch makes the bushing come out much easier. I use an air impact to turn the press screw on removal and installations both. When you are installing the bushings you have to be sure it's going in straight on the pin and lined up with the other bushing. I have used an air chisel in the past to remove the frame spring bushings. I'm not sure that there is enough room to use this tool for that operation. These sell from about 25 bucks to over 200, depending on where you get it and how complete the kit is. The high-end ones come with many more drivers than the one I have.

Brian