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Orestudeguy
09-24-2006, 12:15 PM
Question,
A friend wants to add power steering to his 55 Stude wagon.. It does not have to be all Stude (he is not concerned with the purist stuff, he just wants power steering)..
He has asked me to find out what people have done to add power steering to their cars..
I should add that his car is a 55 Constoga wgon with a V/8 & a three speed transmission..
Any thoughts/suggestions?
thanks,

George
65 Commander 2door
64 Wagonaire
63 Champ
63 GT Hawk
51 Champion Starlight Coupe

sbca96
09-24-2006, 04:56 PM
Unless you want to re-engineer the steering on a Studebaker, the best
way to add power steering is to get a system from a 60's Studebaker.
Adding a rack & pinion has proven to be too much hassle, and limited
success. Those that claim to have done it, without 'bumpsteer' wont
give details, and then there is the overly expensive Phantom setup. I
have yet to read about someone who has one on their car, and tested
for bumpsteer. Phantom claims "no bumpsteer", but I (and others) dont
see how you can change the tie rod link points to the wider spread of
R&P and NOT have bumpsteer issues. Their "upgraded" tubular a-arms
use the same mounting points as stock Studebaker, and they use Mustang
II spindles. Mustang II is kinda outdated now, but parts are common.

Tom

'63 Avanti, zinc plated drilled & slotted 03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, soon: 97 Z28 T-56 6-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves, 'R3' 276 cam, Edelbrock AFB Carb, GM HEI distributor, 8.8mm plug wires

Roscomacaw
09-24-2006, 05:25 PM
George, the EASIEST way is to find a PS setup from a 53 thru 57 sedan (some 58s had it too) It's bolt-in easy cause it's made to. You CAN go the way Tom suggests - which makes it a bit easier to find the stuff - but there's issues with the pitman arm and reach rod that would have to be solved and there's no "bolt-in" parts that I know of to "easily" intermingle the two systems.
One other thing is that 53 thru 56 had the same splines on their steering shaft - this means you can use the stock steering wheel, whereas, 57 & later wheels only fit shafts from their own era span.
BTW, in getting the whole thing - at least the upper part of the steering clumn has to be from a sedan/wagon. The C-K upper section is too long and the C-K reach rod's different as well. All the other pieces, the sector, pump, mount, pulleys whatnot are the same.:D

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle!!

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

sbca96
09-24-2006, 05:39 PM
If everything from the front of a Lark, box, steering column, reach
rod, center link, etc were bought, it would all bolt in - correct?
The 50's boxes were like 6 turns lock to lock, a Lark would bring it
down to a more manageable 4.5 turns lock to lock. A Lark parts car
should have everything to "bolt in" if you swap as an assembly. It
makes sense, since that body ended becoming the Lark. A C/K is all
different pretty much, a few simular parts. Right?[?]

Tom

studegary
09-24-2006, 06:49 PM
quote:Originally posted by sbca96

If everything from the front of a Lark, box, steering column, reach
rod, center link, etc were bought, it would all bolt in - correct?
The 50's boxes were like 6 turns lock to lock, a Lark would bring it
down to a more manageable 4.5 turns lock to lock. A Lark parts car
should have everything to "bolt in" if you swap as an assembly. It
makes sense, since that body ended becoming the Lark. A C/K is all
different pretty much, a few simular parts. Right?[?]

Tom


I believe that it could be installed (from a Lark), but his current steering wheel would not fit. He would have to use the Lark wheel.

Gary L.
Wappinger, NY

1959 DeLuxe pickup (restomod)

whacker
09-24-2006, 06:55 PM
Before your friend starts looking for a power steering setup, what is his real problem? Studebaker steering requires lots of grease to work right, and after all these years they tend to need service. He may need kingpins and new grease seals. If the steering is properly serviced and if the pins and bushings are within specs, the car should not be hard to steer at all. Power steering should be a last resort!