PDA

View Full Version : C/K model definition



handworn
01-22-2014, 12:46 PM
Please forgive my ignorance, but I've seen the term "C/K model" used a lot on these forums, and I haven't been able to pick up the exact definition from context, forum searching or search engines. Can someone help me out here? (By the way, is there a glossary thread somewhere? One might be useful.)

warrlaw1
01-22-2014, 12:50 PM
It all started in 1953 with the coupes and hardtops. Coupes have a C pillar, hardtops don't. The I.D. plate on the firewall will have a C for coupes and a K for hardtops. It carried on through all the Hawks until the GT hawks which are all hardtops.

PackardV8
01-22-2014, 12:51 PM
IIRC, The short version is:

C-body is '53-61 120" wheelbase two-door coupe, incl Flight Hawk, Power Hawk, Hawk

K-body is '53-58 and '62-64 120" wheelbase two-door hardtop - incl Golden Hawk, Sky Hawk, GT Hawk

There are myriad varieties, but I think that's the basics

jack vines

StudeRich
01-22-2014, 01:03 PM
A 1954 Champion 6, C Body Starlight Coupe:
31653

A 1954 Champion 6, K Body Starliner Hardtop.
31654 You can click these TWO times for a good sized Pic.

handworn
01-22-2014, 01:25 PM
Thanks everyone! I love learning this stuff. Now I can use the term and not sound like a fool. ;)

brngarage
01-22-2014, 02:10 PM
Minor correction Dave; they all have a "C" pillar (by the rear window), coupes have a "B" pillar between the door and the rear quarter window.

8E45E
01-22-2014, 02:15 PM
Here is a thread with plenty of pics of them: http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?42355-C-K-Eye-Candy&highlight=2010

Craig

rockinhawk
01-22-2014, 02:27 PM
Just remember C stands for Coupe. But then there is also a C cab truck. Built from 49-64. Some of these are the R model. Not to be confused with the R series engines.

warrlaw1
01-22-2014, 02:54 PM
LOL. When I first received my Shop manual the model names scared the crap out of me. After 7 years of indoctrination I can actually find what I need by the model names and numbers. It just rubs off on ya.

pbrown
01-22-2014, 04:19 PM
Something else that I figured out after I got the C/K difference down (Correct me if I'm wrong...)

Because of their pillared construction, the C Coupes were inherently more structurally sound.

The K Hardtops' frames required additional U shaped stiffening under the doorsills from the factory. These are the "hog troughs" that you hear so much about (you especially hear that they are full of rust, and are a real pain to replace)

warrlaw1
01-22-2014, 04:27 PM
Absolutely. If the old hog troughs are still there, you can use them for a template and make new ones up pretty quickly on a metal brake with 16 gauge steel. Welding them in requires a plan of attack. You can spot weld them, then attack with a few holes in the floor from above and leave the ends open until all your welding is complete.

studegary
01-23-2014, 10:24 AM
The above information is good for 1953-1964 models, once the C pillar was corrected to B pillar, but there were other years of C bodies. The five passenger/Starlight coupes of 1947-1952 were also C body coupes.

8E45E
01-23-2014, 02:19 PM
The above information is good for 1953-1964 models, once the C pillar was corrected to B pillar, but there were other years of C bodies. The five passenger/Starlight coupes of 1947-1952 were also C body coupes.

As was the 1952 Starliner, which was also a K-body, and based on the convertible, which I believe was the S-body in those years.

Craig

rockne10
01-23-2014, 08:11 PM
So...cut the roof below the rear window and above the windshield to reveal a potential convertible and it is a K. Cut the roof below the rear window and above the windshield and still have a mess to deal with between the front door and rear quarter windows and it is a C?

SN-60
01-23-2014, 08:21 PM
I define C/K this way.................C=$$$$, K=$$$$$$!:whome:

candbstudebakers
01-24-2014, 01:54 AM
If a K body is a hardtop then the C body must be a soft top but all coupes C body cars have a steel hard as hell top. I'am just kidding I know the difference.