PDA

View Full Version : 1962 Rambler Classic vs. 1962 Studebaker Lark Y body



1962larksedan
12-05-2013, 10:06 PM
Many people have mixed up 1960's Ramblers with same era Lark types..............

I now understand since my boss has a 1962 Rambler Classic 4 door; I swear that sedan shares a whole lot of similar styling cues with the same year Lark Y body i.e. wraparound windshield and wraparound back window, etc.

41 Frank
12-05-2013, 10:35 PM
My '63 Lark has been called a Rambler more than once.

Bill Pressler
12-06-2013, 07:06 AM
I like the '63 Rambler, but to my eyes, the '62 looks like an Eastern bloc product!

I've always heard Ramblers were good cars, but I like the overall packaging of Studebakers in this period better.

raprice
12-06-2013, 08:12 AM
My '59 Lark has been called a Rambler many times. What it tells me is that it's imperative that we show our cars as often as possible to inform the public. There's a whole generation of people who have never even heard of Studebaker.
Rog

jackb
12-06-2013, 08:46 AM
....what is the parts' availability for Ramblers these days ??

Roscomacaw
12-06-2013, 01:12 PM
Parts are out there, but NOTHING like what Studes have available. Part of the dearth is due to the fact that Chrysler offered pennies on the dollars worth for old AMC parts that dealers had on their shelves at the time. With STRICT orders that the parts be destroyed when they were redeemed at distribution centers. This is not to say there aren't ANY NOS parts out there - there just aren't any generous stashes.

Bamajak
12-06-2013, 01:58 PM
My wife wants to rip the heart out of the people who call her Lark a Rambler. So far so has not, (As of 1:56pm 12/06/2013 Eastern Time).

kurtruk
12-06-2013, 02:59 PM
My '59 Lark has been called a Rambler many times. What it tells me is that it's imperative that we show our cars as often as possible to inform the public. There's a whole generation of people who have never even heard of Studebaker.
Rog

I'm gonna say there's also a whole generation that hasn't heard of Rambler, either! After all, that name ended in 1969 in the U.S. market.

61LaRk4dr
12-06-2013, 05:13 PM
I have always had a fondness for the 1958-1962 Rambler cars, especially the XC Wagons. I am still on the lookout for a 1961 AMC XC wagon with the V-8 and the pushbutton automatic. I always liked the fact that they came standard with the luggage rack, and also had the reclining seats. The reclining seats for a Lark were an option, and as I found out, very hard to get ahold of if not installed already. Don’t get me wrong, I still “Love that Lark” that I have but I wouldn’t hesitate to get ahold of a XC Rambler either….and yes I have been told: That’s a nice Rambler!

Bordeaux Daytona
12-06-2013, 05:23 PM
Rambler had that torque tube driveshaft. Also I thought I remembered seeing tapered axles on a friend's 69 sc/rambler.

Warren Webb
12-06-2013, 05:37 PM
I personally never liked the front suspension design. Didn't look substantial enough, especially after seeing one break apart on a slow turn in front of me when I was 15. Yeah Studebaker used king pins up to the end in 66 but they were rugged & had the respect of front end mechanics. My 41 Ford pickup had torque-tube driveshaft & I think Chevy did away with them after 54.

Jessie J.
12-06-2013, 05:43 PM
I have owned my '62 Lark 2dr for around 15 years now and have always been a Studebaker nut, and have owned 10 of 'em, 5 presently, however..
My first car as a licensed driver at the age of 16 was a 1962 Green and white Rambler Classic. The aluminum 6 had went away at low miles so it had been repowered with a Chevy 283 & PG and rear axle.
I added a Weiand Hi-Rise & AFB and a wicked rump rump Duntov cam. Wasn't fast but the big 'Chevy Power' decals on the windows and the sound alone scared off most would be street challenges. :D

Really the 'Rambler' part was neat with its colorful dash and 'lay down' seats, (oh wow and 16) and it was a very solidly built body shell.
The '68 AMX I latter owned was a disappointing falling apart heap of junk in comparison.

JBOYLE
12-06-2013, 06:54 PM
The all new 63 Rambler was years ahead if the 62, and in the opinion of many, far better than the Lark. The 64 Studebakers looked more modern, like the Rambler, but were old under the sheet metal.

Mike Sal
12-06-2013, 07:38 PM
Sadly, there seem to be fewer ramblers running out on the street these days than studebakers. Young people don't know what they are either....
Mike Sal

R_David
12-06-2013, 09:21 PM
Yup, I never heard of a Rambler until I saw it on here. I don't think I have ever seen one either. And I was born in 1969.

southbend
12-06-2013, 10:12 PM
It would be interesting to see a Lark and a Rambler parked side-by-side to compare the styling similarities and differences. Anyone here adept with Photoshop?

JBOYLE
12-06-2013, 10:22 PM
Yup, I never heard of a Rambler until I saw it on here. I don't think I have ever seen one either. And I was born in 1969.

Thanks for making me feel ancient. I feel like some old guy going on about his Pope-Toledo (it's bad enough I go on about my "Stutz" Bearcat..and heck, I've run into more a few people who have never heard of Studebakers.). :)
As a kid, my family owned two new Ramblers...a 63 and 65.
By the time you came along it was AMC.

WinM1895
12-06-2013, 10:30 PM
1917: Charlie Nash, former GM president, bought the Thomas B. Jeffrey Co. of Kenosha WI, changed its name to Nash Motors.

1937: Nash bought the Kelvinator Corp, name changed to Nash-Kelvinator. 1954: Nash-Kelvinator merged with Hudson to form AMC (American Motors Corporation).

Both the Nash & Hudson names were dropped at the end of the 1957 model run.

1902/13 Rambler (Thomas B. Jeffrey Co.) / 1950/57 Nash Rambler / 1955/56 Hudson Rambler / 1958/69 AMC Rambler.

All Studebakers are body on frame construction, all 1950/69 Ramblers are unitized construction-body/frame is a one piece welded assembly.

Skybolt
12-06-2013, 10:44 PM
The all new 63 Rambler was years ahead if the 62, and in the opinion of many, far better than the Lark. The 64 Studebakers looked more modern, like the Rambler, but were old under the sheet metal.

As much as I am not a fan of the 62 sheet metal I would like to see a 64 go head to head in any type of race with the 63 Rambler and see which comes out best. Of course each could use whatever they could in any factory trim available. I just can't see your point being valid but I don't know Ramblers that well. A 64 fully optioned with an R series package is one of the best for many years. Just look at the PSMCD each year. I don't see many AMC derivatives beating any Studebakers.

JBOYLE
12-06-2013, 10:53 PM
As much as I am not a fan of the 62 sheet metal I would like to see a 64 go head to head in any type of race with the 63 Rambler and see which comes out best. Of course each could use whatever they could in any factory trim available. I just can't see your point being valid but I don't know Ramblers that well. A 64 fully optioned with an R series package is one of the best for many years. Just look at the PSMCD each year. I don't see many AMC derivatives beating any Studebakers.

My comments are based on my family owning a new 63 Rambler Classic 770 with the new V-8 and factory air.
From what I've seen of period Studebakers, the Rambler has them beat in design and interior appointments. As an example, the Rambler had built in-dash AC. It just looks like a better car...certainly it's underpinnings were newer than 1953..or 59.

WinM1895
12-06-2013, 11:04 PM
Nash was not only the first car to offer in-dash A/C, but was the first car (1938) to have a fresh air heater, which was called Weather-Eye. GM was so impressed, they used the Nash system under license.

1955/56 Packard factory A/C is an in dash unit, has two registers in the top of the dash. This was a Nash A/C that Packard obtained in a 'trade-off' with AMC by selling them V8 engines/Twin Ultramatic in 1955 and partially in 1956.

New AMC V8 introduced mid-year 1956 along with Borg Warner sourced A/T. Nash dealers probably rejoiced as the Twin Ultramatic was a troublesome turd from day one.

Packard nuts refer to it as ULCERmatic.

mmagic
12-06-2013, 11:28 PM
Rambler? Heck the biggest insult I've gotten was the guy along a parade route, attempting to impress his wife and all around sticking his head near the window of my Champ and loudly asking "What year DeSoto is this?"....... even though the magnetic sign on the door proclaimed authorized Studebaker Service.

southbend
12-07-2013, 07:49 AM
Rambler? Heck the biggest insult I've gotten was the guy along a parade route, attempting to impress his wife and all around sticking his head near the window of my Champ and loudly asking "What year DeSoto is this?"....... even though the magnetic sign on the door proclaimed authorized Studebaker Service.

Didn't you know that DeSoto and Studebaker merged in the 1950s?;)

1962larksedan
12-07-2013, 08:51 AM
1917: Charlie Nash, former GM president, bought the Thomas B. Jeffrey Co. of Kenosha WI, changed its name to Nash Motors.

1937: Nash bought the Kelvinator Corp, name changed to Nash-Kelvinator. 1954: Nash-Kelvinator merged with Hudson to form AMC (American Motors Corporation).

Both the Nash & Hudson names were dropped at the end of the 1957 model run.

1902/13 Rambler (Thomas B. Jeffrey Co.) / 1950/57 Nash Rambler / 1955/56 Hudson Rambler / 1958/69 AMC Rambler.

All Studebakers are body on frame construction, all 1950/69 Ramblers are unitized construction-body/frame is a one piece welded assembly.

And those two basic Rambler platforms lived on to 1978 with the Matador (Ambassador/Classic/Rebel) along with the Eagle/Gremlin/Hornet/Spirit, etc. to 1987 (American/Javelin/AMX). The 1975-80 Pacer was the only AMC designed car platform offered after 'Rambler'.

southbend
12-07-2013, 09:21 AM
And those two basic Rambler platforms lived on to 1978 with the Matador (Ambassador/Classic/Rebel) along with the Eagle/Gremlin/Hornet/Spirit, etc. to 1987 (American/Javelin/AMX). The 1975-80 Pacer was the only AMC designed car platform offered after 'Rambler'.

I once owned a '77 Pacer in the early '80s. And you thought Studebakers leaked oil? That Pacer hemorrhaged oil.

Studedude
12-07-2013, 12:27 PM
Speaking of Pacers, I am looking at a modified Stude truck that has been subframed with a Pacer front suspension. So, the truck has power rack and pinion steering, and power front disc brakes.

It also has an Olds V8.

I'm not familiar with the Pacer front clip, but I suspect the builder knew what he was doing.

When the weather breaks, I'm going to go take it for a test drive.

Anybody know how the Pacer clip compares to the Mustang II?

SN-60
12-07-2013, 12:33 PM
1917: Charlie Nash, former GM president, bought the Thomas B. Jeffrey Co. of Kenosha WI, changed its name to Nash Motors.

1937: Nash bought the Kelvinator Corp, name changed to Nash-Kelvinator. 1954: Nash-Kelvinator merged with Hudson to form AMC (American Motors Corporation).

Both the Nash & Hudson names were dropped at the end of the 1957 model run.

1902/13 Rambler (Thomas B. Jeffrey Co.) / 1950/57 Nash Rambler / 1955/56 Hudson Rambler / 1958/69 AMC Rambler.

All Studebakers are body on frame construction, all 1950/69 Ramblers are unitized construction-body/frame is a one piece welded assembly.

Hudson + Nash = Hash

1962larksedan
12-07-2013, 06:49 PM
Speaking of Pacers, I am looking at a modified Stude truck that has been subframed with a Pacer front suspension. So, the truck has power rack and pinion steering, and power front disc brakes.

It also has an Olds V8.

I'm not familiar with the Pacer front clip, but I suspect the builder knew what he was doing.

When the weather breaks, I'm going to go take it for a test drive.

Anybody know how the Pacer clip compares to the Mustang II?

The Pacer subframe apparently was quite a good unit since it had decent sized disc brakes from the factory. The biggest problem is trying to get replacement parts since (probably) the whole suspension was Pacer specific only.........

Studedude
12-07-2013, 07:58 PM
The Pacer subframe apparently was quite a good unit since it had decent sized disc brakes from the factory. The biggest problem is trying to get replacement parts since (probably) the whole suspension was Pacer specific only.........
Good to know... thanks!

JunkYardDog
12-09-2013, 09:51 AM
....what is the parts' availability for Ramblers these days ??


I can tell you back in the early 70's when I was a kid working in the wrecking yards we always had Ramblers but few Studebaker's .

Two things I remember about the ramblers were the shift linkage went to h*ll on the columns a lot and the rear ends had the shocks almost hold the rear end on they had coil springs in the back instead of leaf like Studebaker's and if a shock broke and you raised the car up to load on a wrecker the coil springs could fall right out then they were a bitch to load.

I actually had them rip right out from under the car and start coming apart while loading them, they have inclosed drive shafts and if the puny bolts that held them on the transmission broke the rear ends would fall right out from under the car.
If a shock broke and the coil fell out of place at speed over a rough road the car could go out of control .

Give me a Studebaker any day , there had to be a reason there were more Ramblers in the wrecking yards then Studebaker's.
About the only thing we ever sold out off the Ramblers were the radiators, then they would just sit there and rot.

Jessie J.
12-09-2013, 10:31 AM
Its a much different world now than the one that I grew up in. My grandchildren do know what a Studebaker is, 'cause their grandpa has a half a dozen of them, but have no idea of any 'Rambler'? or 'Hudson'?
They will never even think to ask me that old question; 'Is that some kind of Rambler?'

Which has never really bothered me much at all anyway, because in the past I have owned and loved a Rambler, and a Hudson, have driven a 'DeSoto' and a 'Plymouth', and used to play my afternoons away in a 'Kaiser', and a 'bathtub Nash'.
My 'dream car' as a teen ager was a 'Hupmobile Skylark' :D
These are all about as foreign to them as some unknown Chinese make is to me.

Already they get a bit of a glazed and perplexed look in their eye when I tell them that I worked for 'Fisher Body' and built 'Oldsmobiles'. Yes, there are a few still around, but their presence and once proud reputation simply does not register to these children of a new age, any more than Jack Benny's infamous 'Maxwell'.

EssexExport
12-09-2013, 10:36 AM
It certainly can be hilarious when the non-informed expound their automotive knowledge.

Jessie J.
12-09-2013, 11:04 AM
I can tell you back in the early 70's when I was a kid working in the wrecking yards we always had Ramblers but few Studebaker's .

Two things I remember about the ramblers were the shift linkage went to h*ll on the columns a lot and the rear ends had the shocks almost hold the rear end on they had coil springs in the back instead of leaf like Studebaker's and if a shock broke and you raised the car up to load on a wrecker the coil springs could fall right out then they were a bitch to load.

I actually had them rip right out from under the car and start coming apart while loading them, they have inclosed drive shafts and if the puny bolts that held them on the transmission broke the rear ends would fall right out from under the car.
If a shock broke and the coil fell out of place at speed over a rough road the car could go out of control .

Give me a Studebaker any day , there had to be a reason there were more Ramblers in the wrecking yards then Studebaker's.
About the only thing we ever sold out off the Ramblers were the radiators, then they would just sit there and rot.
Know what your talking about. I had to install leaf springs in my '62 Classic to keep the rear axle from falling out.
Got some hilarious stories on my 'learning curve' with that one.

Mikado282
12-09-2013, 06:49 PM
If things had gone as had been originally planned Studebaker and AMC(Rambler) would of merged sometime in the late 50's. The Studebaker-Packard and Hudson-Nash mergers was just the first round. After a couple of years of digesting their merger partners then Studebaker and AMC were supposed to merge, but the guy who originally planned and orchestrated died of a sudden heart attack and the second part of the planned merger was never completed which left both companies doomed to fail eventually. Both companies made comebacks during the 58-64 time frame but neither one had the financial resources to sustain it. Would have been interesting to see if the combination would have worked.

Rambler to me means pre 1967 AMC's

A couple of observations: the Rambler and Studebaker V8's look so very much alike externally, I have to wonder if they might have had common ancestor. No other car manufacturers V8 engines look so much alike in the 50-60's. The reason I was always given for their being no aftermarket speed equipment for the the Rambler V8 that it would be useless to try to get more horsepower because of it's siamesed center exhaust port, yet Studebaker V8's do very well with theirs. Is their something else in the equation other than factory support? They both used the same basic BW automatic(Ford also used it too). Rambler had the best version IMO that it could be started in both first and second gear fully automatic. Why did not Studebaker use this version? Maybe it was a cost decision? Although I can't imigine it being that much more. One of earlier posters mentioned the parts situation, there are many Rambler's over the years that were unable to be repaired or restored because their are no parts available at any cost. Try to find a trunion for one. Studebaker owners have it good in comparison

Corvanti
12-09-2013, 07:03 PM
wasn't the merge proposed by George Mason around 1954?

also, if Chrysler wouldn't have destroyed AMC parts (as stated above) when they acquired AMC - mainly for Jeep - many more NOS parts would be available. did Chrysler also destroy old AMC Jeep parts?

just asking....

1962larksedan
12-09-2013, 07:09 PM
If things had gone as had been originally planned Studebaker and AMC(Rambler) would of merged sometime in the late 50's. The Studebaker-Packard and Hudson-Nash mergers was just the first round. After a couple of years of digesting their merger partners then Studebaker and AMC were supposed to merge, but the guy who originally planned and orchestrated died of a sudden heart attack and the second part of the planned merger was never completed which left both companies doomed to fail eventually. Both companies made comebacks during the 58-64 time frame but neither one had the financial resources to sustain it. Would have been interesting to see if the combination would have worked.

Rambler to me means pre 1967 AMC's

A couple of observations: the Rambler and Studebaker V8's look so very much alike externally, I have to wonder if they might have had common ancestor. No other car manufacturers V8 engines look so much alike in the 50-60's. The reason I was always given for their being no aftermarket speed equipment for the the Rambler V8 that it would be useless to try to get more horsepower because of it's siamesed center exhaust port, yet Studebaker V8's do very well with theirs. Is their something else in the equation other than factory support? They both used the same basic BW automatic(Ford also used it too). Rambler had the best version IMO that it could be started in both first and second gear fully automatic. Why did not Studebaker use this version? Maybe it was a cost decision? Although I can't imigine it being that much more. One of earlier posters mentioned the parts situation, there are many Rambler's over the years that were unable to be repaired or restored because their are no parts available at any cost. Try to find a trunion for one. Studebaker owners have it good in comparison

Rambler specific stuff isn't that hard to find; that coming from someone who had a 1967 American SW (me).

Siamese center exhaust ports: Pontiac V8's had those as well and God knows how much speed equipment was built for GTO's let alone Firebirds, etc.

qsanford
12-09-2013, 08:22 PM
I think if the four companies had merged at the same time, it might have worked. The new American Motors would have had a full line of commercial vehicles and a genuine Luxury brand to complement their strong economy and mid range automobile lineup. If only...

WinM1895
12-09-2013, 08:55 PM
If things had gone as had been originally planned :confused: Studebaker and AMC(Rambler) would of merged sometime in the late 50's. :confused:
There was never any plan for Studebaker...alone...to merge with anyone. George Mason, president of Nash-Kelvinator had proposed during WWII that the independents (excepting Willys) merge, but no one was interested because they knew there would be a sellers market as soon as the war ended.

But by mid-year 1953, the handwriting was on the wall, due to 'The Deuce's' (Henry Ford II) price war with Chevrolet and the cuts in defense contracts, the independents (excepting Kaiser-Willys) knew they had to merge to survive. The plan was that Nash-Kelvinator would acquire Hudson (which was in dire straits financially) forming AMC and Packard would purchase Studebaker (who by the end of the 1953 model run was also in dire financial straits) in a stock swap...then fold S-P into AMC.

AMC formed January 1954, but when Mason died suddenly of a heart attack, his successor George Romney, wanted nothing to do with S-P, which was left to 'go it alone.'

The Studebaker V8 was almost a direct copy of the 331 cid Cadillac OHV V8 introduced in 1949. The AMC V8 was originally developed by Kaiser-Frazer who couldn't afford to build it. At some point (I don't recall the particulars) AMC acquired the plans. The Packard V8 introduced in 1955 was similar to both the Cadillac & Studebaker V8's.

Read all about Packard's purchase of Studebaker: "The Fall of the Packard Motor Car Company" by James A. Ward - Stanford University Press 1995.

1962larksedan
12-10-2013, 09:09 PM
One thing I've also noticed along with other posters here is the survival rate of Studebakers seems to be much higher than comparable vintage Ramblers.............