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Pancho
11-26-2013, 09:03 PM
Can any one date this Studebaker?


29981

Scott
11-26-2013, 09:23 PM
If it never had rubber wheels, I think it would be pre-1900. Also the style of the seat is very boxy compared to anything I've seen in Studebaker advertising from at least the 1890s on. On the other hand the front fork and all that equipment is practically identical to what was used up into the 1910s. So in the end, it's hard to tell exactly. The seat has me most stumped. It may not be original.

Pancho
11-26-2013, 10:22 PM
You're good Scott. Anyone else want to chime in? This is our favorite car's heritage!

sals54
11-26-2013, 10:31 PM
2015 Fuel Free Hybrid

Corvanti
11-26-2013, 10:37 PM
fuel free? i think not given the 1 horsepower - and sitting behind the exhaust!;)

"Studeclunker" should know exactly what it is...

Flashback
11-26-2013, 10:38 PM
I would say post 1851

Studebaker Wheel
11-26-2013, 10:47 PM
First are you sure it is a Studebaker?? If so why. Studebaker made its first buggy in 1857 and last in 1919. If that is a Studebaker it would be somewhere in between. I think I have been asked at least a hundred times to date Studebaker horse drawn vehicles. The idea of model years is so ingrained into our consciousness we have a hard time comprehending that in those days no one gave a whit what year it was built! Years and even decades passed with no changes in design. If there was a change it might be made at any time of the year. THERE WERE NO MODEL YEARS FOR HORSE DRAWN VEHICLES!

Pancho
11-26-2013, 11:16 PM
Its a bit of a ruse because I know the answer to the question. It's in a museum so I know it's a Studebaker. I just love knowing that 50% of the wagons that came across to the west were Studebakers. Where this hack fits in?

EssexExport
11-26-2013, 11:33 PM
With some front fenders it would rival my Prowler appearance-wise. :!!:

8E45E
11-26-2013, 11:34 PM
1888.

Craig

Studebaker Wheel
11-27-2013, 12:22 AM
Its a bit of a ruse because I know the answer to the question. It's in a museum so I know it's a Studebaker. I just love knowing that 50% of the wagons that came across to the west were Studebakers. Where this hack fits in?

Just curious as to why you think the museum knows what year it is?

jimmijim8
11-27-2013, 05:31 AM
1872 jimmijim

Bob Andrews
11-27-2013, 05:45 AM
1872 jimmijim

It's not a jimmijim. OP already said it's a Studebaker.

Jimmijims are the rarest of them all. Limited production due to being problematic.

jclary
11-27-2013, 11:38 AM
Personally, I love these preserved rolling works of art. However, I am far from an expert on them. I know that, in many ways, they are hard to preserve. Keep them exposed to dampness and weather, they are attacked by mold, rot, and decay. Termites love the wood. Paper wasp pick away at exposed wood grain and, over the years, nibble away the wood to turn into nest. Carpenter bees bore holes and weaken the planks. Iron oxide rusts away the hardware. Keep them too dry, and the wood shrinks, warps, and becomes brittle.

As far as identifying, I may be wrong (and usually someone will correct me) but, somewhere along the way, I was told that, early on, Studebaker put their name on all their vehicles. It is my understanding, that there were either logos, model numbers, or some type of identification either stenciled or burned (branded) somewhere along the chassis on all wagons, carriages, and buggies. If I recall correctly, the Studebaker doctors buggy displayed in David Walker's Restaurant has a factor metal ID tag on the undercarriage. Of course, these things were mostly wood. Even those that have survived could have had most wooden components copied, repaired or replaced in the past hundred plus years.

29989 29990

I have seen several Studebaker wagons and seen the factory markings on some. I have found others that still had (although faded) the factory paint and logo on the side planks and not been able to find the markings underneath. I was once offered a wagon that was claimed to be a Studebaker several years ago. The wheels certainly had the Studebaker style oval and canted spokes. However, I could not locate any factory identification, and walked away.

northern
11-27-2013, 12:23 PM
Sorry, not interested in a date. Not my type.

jimmijim8
11-27-2013, 01:37 PM
rebadged engineering I ain't LION
It's not a jimmijim. OP already said it's a Studebaker.

Jimmijims are the rarest of them all. Limited production due to being problematic."cause they weren't standard shift"

bezhawk
11-27-2013, 06:41 PM
My wife won't let me date anymore either!:eek:

Pancho
11-27-2013, 10:37 PM
Alright guys. Here's the story I know.29996

Studebaker Wheel
11-28-2013, 12:01 PM
Alright guys. Here's the story I know.29996

It should be noted that the placard states "circa1892" which indicates they have no idea of the year either. An 1880 or 1919 version would have likely been identical.

GThawkwind
11-28-2013, 02:26 PM
Eh, I'm into older cars and all but I think this would be pushing it;). To be honest I was hoping it was maybe Dave Lester's 53, or Ken Byrd's Hawk. Now those are some studebakers I would date:ohmy:.

Pancho
11-29-2013, 12:16 PM
30024All in good fun. Not everyday you get to see a real vintage Studebaker that could traverse the scenery in the photo. I took this photo looking from the same room that housed the hack. It's our history after all. Hope you all had a Happy Thanksgiving!

Mrs K Corbin
12-03-2013, 01:13 PM
I tried, but it turned me down flat! Said I was too young! LMAO!

Sdude
12-03-2013, 09:05 PM
fuel free? i think not given the 1 horsepower - and sitting behind the exhaust!;)

"Studeclunker" should know exactly what it is...

You should be OK as long as you don't feed "Rusty" any Beefarino....