PDA

View Full Version : Rotisserie for a Lark-ever build one?



tstclr
09-16-2007, 11:12 AM
I'm tossing around the idea of pulling the body of my 63 Lark off the frame. I'd love to have a rotisserie but the cheapest I can get locally is $1700 [B)]
Has anyone on here ever built their own for a Lark? Care to share your plans?
Thanks
Todd


63 Lark 2dr Sedan
http://i31.photobucket.com/albums/c351/tstclr/larkavitar.jpg

tomnoller
09-16-2007, 11:16 AM
Hey Todd - I'm using one a Stude pal and retired Boeing engineer made from heavy plumbing pipes!
I'll snap some pics and post. Hoping to pick up a free king bed frame today, to fabricate the rails as strut supports at the door openings. I'm planning the 'spit' the '63 hardtop and need to bolster the body before hoisting it off the frame.

Western Washington, USA

tomnoller
09-16-2007, 11:16 AM
Hey Todd - I'm using one a Stude pal and retired Boeing engineer made from heavy plumbing pipes!
I'll snap some pics and post. Hoping to pick up a free king bed frame today, to fabricate the rails as strut supports at the door openings. I'm planning the 'spit' the '63 hardtop and need to bolster the body before hoisting it off the frame.

Western Washington, USA

55s
09-16-2007, 11:26 AM
New rotisseries in Old Autos for $895. They look very neat.

I debated quite a bit on one, then bought a 4 post 8K pound lift directly from the US for approx $2K.

I am very happy with it.

Paul

55s
09-16-2007, 11:26 AM
New rotisseries in Old Autos for $895. They look very neat.

I debated quite a bit on one, then bought a 4 post 8K pound lift directly from the US for approx $2K.

I am very happy with it.

Paul

tomnoller
09-16-2007, 12:21 PM
http://www.tomnoller.com/day11.JPG

Am going to swap out the perferated angle iron for something more substantial, before hoisting it.

http://www.tomnoller.com/day12.JPG

http://www.tomnoller.com/day13.JPG

The rest of the pieces my friend built.

http://www.tomnoller.com/day14.JPG

Can anyone guess what those two blue objects are on the floor of the car?

Western Washington, USA

tomnoller
09-16-2007, 12:21 PM
http://www.tomnoller.com/day11.JPG

Am going to swap out the perferated angle iron for something more substantial, before hoisting it.

http://www.tomnoller.com/day12.JPG

http://www.tomnoller.com/day13.JPG

The rest of the pieces my friend built.

http://www.tomnoller.com/day14.JPG

Can anyone guess what those two blue objects are on the floor of the car?

Western Washington, USA

Swifster
09-16-2007, 01:35 PM
quote:Originally posted by tomnoller

http://www.tomnoller.com/day11.JPG

http://www.tomnoller.com/day14.JPG

Can anyone guess what those two blue objects are on the floor of the car?


My guess is an aftermarket brake caliper bracket...

I've looked into building my own as well. I'd like to score some plans and do them myself. Raw steel is still cheaper than buying a finished product. And with my car being a hardtop, I'll aso need to brace the door openings.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Valrico, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $1755.45)

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/rollingpi.gif http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/01-01-05TheStartingPoint.jpg http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/07-17-07FrontClipRemoved.jpg

Swifster
09-16-2007, 01:35 PM
quote:Originally posted by tomnoller

http://www.tomnoller.com/day11.JPG

http://www.tomnoller.com/day14.JPG

Can anyone guess what those two blue objects are on the floor of the car?


My guess is an aftermarket brake caliper bracket...

I've looked into building my own as well. I'd like to score some plans and do them myself. Raw steel is still cheaper than buying a finished product. And with my car being a hardtop, I'll aso need to brace the door openings.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Valrico, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $1755.45)

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/rollingpi.gif http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/01-01-05TheStartingPoint.jpg http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/07-17-07FrontClipRemoved.jpg

dave smith
09-16-2007, 02:33 PM
there are places that rent them. thats what I'm going to do at $150 a month I figure that I can do everything I need to in a month

dave smith
09-16-2007, 02:33 PM
there are places that rent them. thats what I'm going to do at $150 a month I figure that I can do everything I need to in a month

tstclr
09-16-2007, 02:56 PM
Thanks for the tip on the ones in Old Auto's Paul. I'll check them out. You may be right in the fact I might be better off to put my $$ into a hoist. A hoist would be handy AFTER the restoration as well!
Todd


63 Lark 2dr Sedan
http://i31.photobucket.com/albums/c351/tstclr/larkavitar.jpg

tstclr
09-16-2007, 02:56 PM
Thanks for the tip on the ones in Old Auto's Paul. I'll check them out. You may be right in the fact I might be better off to put my $$ into a hoist. A hoist would be handy AFTER the restoration as well!
Todd


63 Lark 2dr Sedan
http://i31.photobucket.com/albums/c351/tstclr/larkavitar.jpg

StudeRich
09-16-2007, 07:22 PM
Tom; those blue brackets do resemble disc brake brackets, but my 1 size does all ladder has a couple of gadgets that look like that, to convert it from ladder to scaffold it's a 28 way universal ladder.

StudeRich
Studebakers Northwest
Ferndale, WA

StudeRich
09-16-2007, 07:22 PM
Tom; those blue brackets do resemble disc brake brackets, but my 1 size does all ladder has a couple of gadgets that look like that, to convert it from ladder to scaffold it's a 28 way universal ladder.

StudeRich
Studebakers Northwest
Ferndale, WA

52 Ragtop
09-16-2007, 08:11 PM
I think I reconize those brackets! <G>

Jim

52 Ragtop
09-16-2007, 08:11 PM
I think I reconize those brackets! <G>

Jim

BobPalma
09-16-2007, 08:45 PM
:) Todd: If you can wait for the November 2007 Hemmings Classic Car to appear on the newsstands, it contains an excellent article entitled "How to Build Your Own Rotisserie" complete with materials list, etc.

My subscription copy was in the mail when I got home from The Pure Stock Drags, so it ought to be on the newsstands within two weeks. [8D] BP

BobPalma
09-16-2007, 08:45 PM
:) Todd: If you can wait for the November 2007 Hemmings Classic Car to appear on the newsstands, it contains an excellent article entitled "How to Build Your Own Rotisserie" complete with materials list, etc.

My subscription copy was in the mail when I got home from The Pure Stock Drags, so it ought to be on the newsstands within two weeks. [8D] BP

dave smith
09-16-2007, 09:15 PM
try Roto 2000 auto rotisseries web site $760 for basic one

dave smith
09-16-2007, 09:15 PM
try Roto 2000 auto rotisseries web site $760 for basic one

gordr
09-16-2007, 09:31 PM
Todd, can I suggest that you simply build or set up your rotisserie to bolt to the car's frame, and leave the body on the frame? There are a number of reasons:
1. By taking the body off the frame, you automatically double the amount of work/storage space required for your project. Nice if you have the room, but few of us do.
2. Studebaker bodies were custom-shimmed to the frame with rubber shims. Everything has long since taken a "set", and separating/rejoining the body/frame combo may end up with panels not fitting well.
3. It's just a lot more work, body off. Unless there is a compelling reason to go body-off, I'd leave it on. With the FRAME on a rotisserie, you can get at nearly all the floor area from underneath. If there areas of the floor rusted directly over a frame rail, you can work from the top. Leaving the body on the frame allows for the frame to keep the body true. If you have a car with serious rust issues, the body alone may become stretched or warped while on the rotisserie.
4. If you are determined to go body-off, to get that concours shine on the underside, can I suggest that you first mount it on the rotisserie body-on, do your structural rust repairs, and then go body-off for the prep and finish?

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

gordr
09-16-2007, 09:31 PM
Todd, can I suggest that you simply build or set up your rotisserie to bolt to the car's frame, and leave the body on the frame? There are a number of reasons:
1. By taking the body off the frame, you automatically double the amount of work/storage space required for your project. Nice if you have the room, but few of us do.
2. Studebaker bodies were custom-shimmed to the frame with rubber shims. Everything has long since taken a "set", and separating/rejoining the body/frame combo may end up with panels not fitting well.
3. It's just a lot more work, body off. Unless there is a compelling reason to go body-off, I'd leave it on. With the FRAME on a rotisserie, you can get at nearly all the floor area from underneath. If there areas of the floor rusted directly over a frame rail, you can work from the top. Leaving the body on the frame allows for the frame to keep the body true. If you have a car with serious rust issues, the body alone may become stretched or warped while on the rotisserie.
4. If you are determined to go body-off, to get that concours shine on the underside, can I suggest that you first mount it on the rotisserie body-on, do your structural rust repairs, and then go body-off for the prep and finish?

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

clarkwd
09-16-2007, 11:11 PM
I made one out of plywood. It worked for me. Pix here.
Bill
http://www.rustyrestorations.org/gallery2/main.php?g2_itemId=118

clarkwd
09-16-2007, 11:11 PM
I made one out of plywood. It worked for me. Pix here.
Bill
http://www.rustyrestorations.org/gallery2/main.php?g2_itemId=118

Swifster
09-17-2007, 12:24 AM
quote:Originally posted by clarkwd

I made one out of plywood. It worked for me. Pix here.


I like the idea about using wood. I think I'd personally use 4"X4", but the concept is an interesting one. I think I'll wait for the Hemmings Classic Car and see what might translate to wood.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Valrico, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $1755.45)

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/rollingpi.gif http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/01-01-05TheStartingPoint.jpg http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/07-17-07FrontClipRemoved.jpg

Swifster
09-17-2007, 12:24 AM
quote:Originally posted by clarkwd

I made one out of plywood. It worked for me. Pix here.


I like the idea about using wood. I think I'd personally use 4"X4", but the concept is an interesting one. I think I'll wait for the Hemmings Classic Car and see what might translate to wood.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Valrico, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $1755.45)

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/rollingpi.gif http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/01-01-05TheStartingPoint.jpg http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/07-17-07FrontClipRemoved.jpg

tomnoller
09-17-2007, 07:28 AM
<<I think I reconize those brackets! <G>
<<Jim

Yes you do, Jim. You made 'em!

Western Washington, USA

tomnoller
09-17-2007, 07:28 AM
<<I think I reconize those brackets! <G>
<<Jim

Yes you do, Jim. You made 'em!

Western Washington, USA

tomnoller
09-19-2007, 08:13 PM
With my bride's help, we got the frame out and rolled to the stall next door and mounted the Daytona to the spit!

http://www.tomnoller.com/day16.JPG

I used a freebie bed frame for support in the door openings. The old undercoating should be a breeze to remove, relatively speaking, and I can clean & paint the frame, rebuild the front end and brakes a whole lot easier now. Hope I can get it all done before the cold weather comes!

Western Washington, USA

tomnoller
09-19-2007, 08:13 PM
With my bride's help, we got the frame out and rolled to the stall next door and mounted the Daytona to the spit!

http://www.tomnoller.com/day16.JPG

I used a freebie bed frame for support in the door openings. The old undercoating should be a breeze to remove, relatively speaking, and I can clean & paint the frame, rebuild the front end and brakes a whole lot easier now. Hope I can get it all done before the cold weather comes!

Western Washington, USA

wally
09-19-2007, 08:41 PM
I built my own fixture and the uprights are 4" square tubing, throughly gusseted and it uses Gm Cavalier etc, rear car hubs for the rotators. And, 4 casters on each end, 2 mounted fore and aft of the base of the uprights. One suggestion on the Rotisserie pictured in the photos, and that is to tie the two ends together with stout tubing at the base. You can make it so the section is removeable(to store the unit)and adjustable for different length vehicles. You can have one piece of tubing telescoping inside the other. I figure that it is better to overbuild the body fixture--make it strong, with a wide stance. than to make economizing a priority. Those stripped car bodies are still heavy--especially if one is lying on top of you. [:0]

wally
09-19-2007, 08:41 PM
I built my own fixture and the uprights are 4" square tubing, throughly gusseted and it uses Gm Cavalier etc, rear car hubs for the rotators. And, 4 casters on each end, 2 mounted fore and aft of the base of the uprights. One suggestion on the Rotisserie pictured in the photos, and that is to tie the two ends together with stout tubing at the base. You can make it so the section is removeable(to store the unit)and adjustable for different length vehicles. You can have one piece of tubing telescoping inside the other. I figure that it is better to overbuild the body fixture--make it strong, with a wide stance. than to make economizing a priority. Those stripped car bodies are still heavy--especially if one is lying on top of you. [:0]

DEEPNHOCK
09-20-2007, 09:09 AM
Cheapest you can get?
Just set it on the ground and roll it on it's side.
Use a hoist to hold it up.
Maybe something soft like styrofoam (covered with a welding tarp).
Body doesn't weigh all that much all by itself.
CASO's ;)
Jeff[8D]

DEEPNHOCK
09-20-2007, 09:09 AM
Cheapest you can get?
Just set it on the ground and roll it on it's side.
Use a hoist to hold it up.
Maybe something soft like styrofoam (covered with a welding tarp).
Body doesn't weigh all that much all by itself.
CASO's ;)
Jeff[8D]

bob40
09-20-2007, 06:44 PM
Are there CASO t-shirts out yet? If the price was right they should sell well.Keeping on topic,I got my rotisserie for free after another guy got done doing his car.Talk to a lot of people and I'll bet you can do the same.

bob40
09-20-2007, 06:44 PM
Are there CASO t-shirts out yet? If the price was right they should sell well.Keeping on topic,I got my rotisserie for free after another guy got done doing his car.Talk to a lot of people and I'll bet you can do the same.

tomnoller
09-21-2007, 07:20 AM
Actually, Jeff's idea's a good one. I did the same on my '55 2-door. Used the engine hoist with a strap to gently lift it off the frame and with lots of blankets I bought at Goodwill and a few sandbags, welded in new pans with the car on it's side.

tomnoller
09-21-2007, 07:20 AM
Actually, Jeff's idea's a good one. I did the same on my '55 2-door. Used the engine hoist with a strap to gently lift it off the frame and with lots of blankets I bought at Goodwill and a few sandbags, welded in new pans with the car on it's side.

wally
09-22-2007, 08:55 PM
quote:Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK

Cheapest you can get?
Just set it on the ground and roll it on it's side.
Use a hoist to hold it up.
Maybe something soft like styrofoam (covered with a welding tarp).
Body doesn't weigh all that much all by itself.
CASO's ;)
Jeff[8D]
There is merit to this suggestion. I did this myself, with a 57 Chebbie 30 years ago. I lined up one row of concrete blocks on the floor with a plank on top of them, set the rocker panel of the body shell on them, and had several people help me roll it on its' side. Then, I used several cut-to-length 2x4's extending through the side window openings to the floor, so it would not roll. Ran a rope up to the rafters, for a backup. It wasn't the perfect solution, but I WAS able to work on the underside of the car and thoroughly remove rust and repair the floor braces and sand the roof. Still, I was braver then, and wouldn't approach it that way, now.

:)

wally
09-22-2007, 08:55 PM
quote:Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK

Cheapest you can get?
Just set it on the ground and roll it on it's side.
Use a hoist to hold it up.
Maybe something soft like styrofoam (covered with a welding tarp).
Body doesn't weigh all that much all by itself.
CASO's ;)
Jeff[8D]
There is merit to this suggestion. I did this myself, with a 57 Chebbie 30 years ago. I lined up one row of concrete blocks on the floor with a plank on top of them, set the rocker panel of the body shell on them, and had several people help me roll it on its' side. Then, I used several cut-to-length 2x4's extending through the side window openings to the floor, so it would not roll. Ran a rope up to the rafters, for a backup. It wasn't the perfect solution, but I WAS able to work on the underside of the car and thoroughly remove rust and repair the floor braces and sand the roof. Still, I was braver then, and wouldn't approach it that way, now.

:)

bams50
09-22-2007, 10:32 PM
As it happens, the Nov. 07 issue of Hemmings Classic Car Magazine (issue #38) has a detailed article on how to build a rotisserie- check that out!

Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

bams50
09-22-2007, 10:32 PM
As it happens, the Nov. 07 issue of Hemmings Classic Car Magazine (issue #38) has a detailed article on how to build a rotisserie- check that out!

Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

tstclr
09-23-2007, 07:45 AM
Still waiting for that issue to show up here. The Oct issue is still on the shelves. Also pondering whether I should just hold out and buy a hoist. Man,it would be SaaWeeeet to have a hoist in my garage!
Todd


63 Lark 2dr Sedan
http://i31.photobucket.com/albums/c351/tstclr/larkavitar.jpg

tstclr
09-23-2007, 07:45 AM
Still waiting for that issue to show up here. The Oct issue is still on the shelves. Also pondering whether I should just hold out and buy a hoist. Man,it would be SaaWeeeet to have a hoist in my garage!
Todd


63 Lark 2dr Sedan
http://i31.photobucket.com/albums/c351/tstclr/larkavitar.jpg

chocolate turkey
09-23-2007, 07:57 AM
I used 2 cheap engine stands and made brackets to fit the frame horns. First time I forgot to empty the ashtray, and watched in horror as the perfect headliner got crap all over it. Live and learn.

Brian K. Curtis

chocolate turkey
09-23-2007, 07:57 AM
I used 2 cheap engine stands and made brackets to fit the frame horns. First time I forgot to empty the ashtray, and watched in horror as the perfect headliner got crap all over it. Live and learn.

Brian K. Curtis

bams50
09-23-2007, 08:05 AM
OOPS- BP told you about the HCC article several posts back[:I]

Great article, though! Even gives a parts list so you could have the steel cut to order when you bought it[8D]

Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

bams50
09-23-2007, 08:05 AM
OOPS- BP told you about the HCC article several posts back[:I]

Great article, though! Even gives a parts list so you could have the steel cut to order when you bought it[8D]

Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131

Swifster
10-03-2007, 08:15 PM
For those without a subscription to HCC, the November issue is at the book/magazine store.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Valrico, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $1755.45)

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/rollingpi.gif http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/01-01-05TheStartingPoint.jpg http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/07-17-07FrontClipRemoved.jpg

Swifster
10-03-2007, 08:15 PM
For those without a subscription to HCC, the November issue is at the book/magazine store.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Valrico, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $1755.45)

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/rollingpi.gif http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/01-01-05TheStartingPoint.jpg http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/The%20Daytona%20File/Avatar%20Size/07-17-07FrontClipRemoved.jpg

55s
10-03-2007, 09:15 PM
The problem with hoists is there always seems to be something already on it!

Its a bit of a curse: Murphy's rule says that as soon as you undertake a major task using the hoist, (and the part is in the mail!) there will be more simple but hoist-required jobs that suddenly require use of the hoist.

Paul R

55s
10-03-2007, 09:15 PM
The problem with hoists is there always seems to be something already on it!

Its a bit of a curse: Murphy's rule says that as soon as you undertake a major task using the hoist, (and the part is in the mail!) there will be more simple but hoist-required jobs that suddenly require use of the hoist.

Paul R