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View Full Version : Check this out, a fingerprint that has lasted almost 50 years! (New picture)



'66Commander
08-21-2013, 09:47 AM
So this is another thing I've been meaning to post for a while;
I went to a junk yard and found the rusted remains of a late Daytona and it had a clock. So I snagged it.
I pulled out the blank from my dash and found a finger print on the side of it.
The picture is kinda bad, if I remember I'll take a better one. But I just found this beyond amazing.
2680326804

8E45E
08-21-2013, 09:52 AM
Is this one also a '66 Daytona?

Craig

'66Commander
08-21-2013, 10:08 AM
It's out of my 66 Commander. The clock was the Daytona.

JimC
08-21-2013, 10:21 AM
I love stuff like this. Seeing that humans actually built and touched these things as they were assembled makes them so much more real and personal to me. Were it my car, I'd preserve that blank as-is, if not for nostalgia, then a conversation piece :)

EDIT: Preserve, as in in a baggie or something. If I had the clock, I'd install it in the dash in a heartbeat!

'66Commander
08-21-2013, 10:35 AM
It definitely will be preserved. I have the clock in the dash now. (The clock doesn't work, but it lights up at least haha)
I love these kind of things too.
It definitely is a wonderful conversation piece, and brings a great nostalgia.

Deaf Mute
08-21-2013, 11:47 AM
JUST WONDERING... Would a clear coat preserve... or destroy that fingerprint? I am afraid that displaying it could cause the fingerprint to disappear.

'66Commander
08-21-2013, 11:58 AM
Hmmm. I'm actually not sure.
I wonder if it lasted so long because it didn't have direct sun on it.
(Also, I didn't realize that you replied to this when I replied to your comment on JimC's post)

skyway
08-21-2013, 05:23 PM
Can't quite tell from the picture, but lots of times prints like that have actually sort of etched the surface.
Regardless, I think that you can "fix" the print with either clear lacquer spray, or by covering it with a strip of better scotch tape, like the slightly wider not so shiny 3M stuff.

PlainBrownR2
08-21-2013, 05:29 PM
Neat! Now for science behind it, which is also a warning about handling freshly bead blasted metal too! The sweat and oil in your fingers behave like a mild acid, so when you touch something, like a bare piece of steel, or painted surface, it the fingerprint will etch itself into the metal. Consequently, just like my example, you now have a piece of another individual imprinted on your vehicle! :D

Nox
08-21-2013, 05:49 PM
Sure is a good thing you had the pants on while taking the pictures... :)

Chris_Dresbach
08-21-2013, 05:58 PM
Every Studebaker employee had his/her fingerprints on their plant I.D. card. Who knows if the archives still has all of those records, but it would be cool to scan that print and figure out exactly who installed that clock originally.

Lark Parker
08-21-2013, 08:19 PM
Every Studebaker employee had his/her fingerprints on their plant I.D. card. Who knows if the archives still has all of those records, but it would be cool to scan that print and figure out exactly who installed that clock originally.

I would think Andy Beckman should be happy to look through the employee fingerprint files for a match. Just ask him.:D

57pack
08-21-2013, 09:24 PM
Finding this fingerprint is very much like a mini time capsule!
Kind of reminds me the time I climbed a mountain in Dixville NH called Tabletop Mtn.
The very top was a flat slab of granite, into which folks carved their initials and dates they were there.
Gives you a weird feeling you are standing where someone from 1896 or so stood in the same exact place.
:whome:

GThawkwind
08-21-2013, 09:51 PM
Finding this fingerprint is very much like a mini time capsule!
Kind of reminds me the time I climbed a mountain in Dixville NH called Tabletop Mtn.
The very top was a flat slab of granite, into which folks carved their initials and dates they were there.
Gives you a weird feeling you are standing where someone from 1896 or so stood in the same exact place.
:whome:
My sister moved into a house in moved into a rental property that belonged to my grandmother(moms side) a few years back. When we walked up the driveway we noticed two nickname signatures carved into the cement dated 1976. My Dad recognized them as something he and his best friend carved after laying the concrete, when his friends parents lived there long before my mother's mother ever owned the place.
I think you should put the blank in a plexi glass case, even cooler if you could trace who's print it was and labelit as such.

Chris_Dresbach
08-21-2013, 10:06 PM
My sister moved into a house in moved into a rental property that belonged to my grandmother(moms side) a few years back. When we walked up the driveway we noticed two nickname signatures carved into the cement dated 1976. My Dad recognized them as something he and his best friend carved after laying the concrete, when his friends parents lived there long before my mother's mother ever owned the place.
I think you should put the blank in a plexi glass case, even cooler if you could trace who's print it was and labelit as such.

The house I live in was built around 1937 or so, and a mud room and concrete steps were added to the back in 1948. Somebody with the initials "FJ" signed it with 1948. I still have no idea what FJ stood for, but I think I may have met the guy about a year ago. One day I was mowing the grass in the front yard and a really old guy randomly pulled in the driveway. After talking to him a couple minutes he said that he and his wife were traveling and came through South Bend to see a few memories, and that he grew up in my house. He only stayed about a half hour, but it was something to see his reaction to how the house looks now. (dad fixed up this place about 20 years ago) Who says a guy can't come back home?

Play Wagon
08-22-2013, 02:01 AM
It seems that "personalizing" cars @ the factory took different forms as well. For instance, on the firewall of my '59 Lark wagon is what appears to be the impression of someone's initials or something, probably made by a dull pencil in wet paint. I'm hoping that I can carefully scuff the surface with a Scotchbrite-type sanding pad prior to repainting the car so that it remains visible. Kinda inconsequential in the whole scheme of things, but to me it seems worth preserving.

JSC

'66Commander
08-22-2013, 10:35 AM
Can't quite tell from the picture, but lots of times prints like that have actually sort of etched the surface.
Regardless, I think that you can "fix" the print with either clear lacquer spray, or by covering it with a strip of better scotch tape, like the slightly wider not so shiny 3M stuff.

I think I'm going to keep the print on there. Its like a birthmark... for my car haha.
I thank you tho for your tips.


Neat! Now for science behind it, which is also a warning about handling freshly bead blasted metal too! The sweat and oil in your fingers behave like a mild acid, so when you touch something, like a bare piece of steel, or painted surface, it the fingerprint will etch itself into the metal. Consequently, just like my example, you now have a piece of another individual imprinted on your vehicle! :D

Really? That's pretty cool.
I wonder if he/she did it on purpose, or an accident.


Sure is a good thing you had the pants on while taking the pictures... :)

Hahahaha! I wasn't expecting something like that. Took me off guard.


Every Studebaker employee had his/her fingerprints on their plant I.D. card. Who knows if the archives still has all of those records, but it would be cool to scan that print and figure out exactly who installed that clock originally.

Really? That would be amazing!
To see who once had touched this before they put it into the dash. It's cool to think about!
As far as your story further down this page; I love talking to people about things like that. Their faces always light up.

I would think Andy Beckman should be happy to look through the employee fingerprint files for a match. Just ask him.:D

Who is he? I'm not quite familiar with names:/


Finding this fingerprint is very much like a mini time capsule!
Kind of reminds me the time I climbed a mountain in Dixville NH called Tabletop Mtn.
The very top was a flat slab of granite, into which folks carved their initials and dates they were there.
Gives you a weird feeling you are standing where someone from 1896 or so stood in the same exact place.
:whome:

That's mind blowing!
I love it when people who things like that.


My sister moved into a house in moved into a rental property that belonged to my grandmother(moms side) a few years back. When we walked up the driveway we noticed two nickname signatures carved into the cement dated 1976. My Dad recognized them as something he and his best friend carved after laying the concrete, when his friends parents lived there long before my mother's mother ever owned the place.
I think you should put the blank in a plexi glass case, even cooler if you could trace who's print it was and labelit as such.

That too is mind blowing. Maybe it was destiny to be in that house :O
I think that would be cool to display it. Especially with the name of who belongs to the print.



It seems that "personalizing" cars @ the factory took different forms as well. For instance, on the firewall of my '59 Lark wagon is what appears to be the impression of someone's initials or something, probably made by a dull pencil in wet paint. I'm hoping that I can carefully scuff the surface with a Scotchbrite-type sanding pad prior to repainting the car so that it remains visible. Kinda inconsequential in the whole scheme of things, but to me it seems worth preserving.

JSC

Definitely is. My firewall is too dirty to see if there is anything there. But I definitely will have to search nooks and cranys while I work on it to see if I can find something else.

'66Commander
08-22-2013, 10:40 AM
Here is a better picture too:
26823
You can see the ridges in the print. (Towards the mounting screw)
If I can get the name of who did this I'm sure that Turning Wheels would love to hear about it. Even the Studebaker Museum would like to get wind I'm sure.

ken-renda
08-22-2013, 11:15 AM
I too see the finger print type find, important to the history of the car. It reminds me of, several years ago, finding a "love letter" inscription inside the fiberglass fin of a 56 GH. It was assembled in California, need I say any more. I photographed it and returned for someone else to find in another 60 years. Ken, Deltaville, Va

'66Commander
08-22-2013, 11:33 AM
Wow. I wonder what the story behind that is.
What if they made the car but bought it for someone?
Would you be able to upload a copy of the picture?

PlainBrownR2
08-22-2013, 03:58 PM
Really? That's pretty cool.
I wonder if he/she did it on purpose, or an accident.


I'd say 9 times out of 10, whoever handled it, had grease or something on their fingers, and they were handling the part at the time that it was installed. It's in the same category as finding nuts, bolts, screws, or tools in the doors. The Studebaker workers weren't handling these cars with latex gloves in the cleanest of environments, they were a production line that was getting the cars out the door as fast and as timely as possible. :D

Lark Parker
08-22-2013, 04:02 PM
My reference to Andy Beckman was a lame joke.
Andy is the go-to guy at the Studebaker National
museum. He's been very helpful in looking at original company records,drawings, etc.

Considering the thousands of possible Studebaker employees @ ten fingers /person (some may have been missing some digits) and the majority of them deceased, the print matchup would be a formidable/impossible task even for the FBI.

I wouldn't ask Andy to do that even to just get his reaction.
Sorry about the "joke".

'66Commander
08-22-2013, 04:09 PM
In your defense, to a person who is more in touch with the Museum would have gotten the joke.
Bad joke, nah.
I just wasn't the fit audience for it haha.

michaelb
08-23-2013, 04:02 AM
IF YOU TAKE SUPER GLUE AND HEAT IT, AS IT TURNS TO A VAPOR HOLD THE PRINT OVER THE VAPOR IT WILL ADHERE TO THE METAL AND PRESERVE THE PRINT. Michaelb

GThawkwind
08-23-2013, 04:17 AM
IF YOU TAKE SUPER GLUE AND HEAT IT, AS IT TURNS TO A VAPOR HOLD THE PRINT OVER THE VAPOR IT WILL ADHERE TO THE METAL AND PRESERVE THE PRINT. Michaelb
I found tonight that if you dump enough super glue on your leg, it'll soak right through and cause a nasty chemical burn.

BobPalma
08-23-2013, 07:58 AM
Neat! Now for science behind it, which is also a warning about handling freshly bead blasted metal too! The sweat and oil in your fingers behave like a mild acid, so when you touch something, like a bare piece of steel, or painted surface, it the fingerprint will etch itself into the metal. :D

True, John.

Now, Studebaker Service Sleuths (The SSS), where in Studebaker Service Literature or procedures is this very topic discussed and cautioned against, lest the part(s) being assembled be damaged by fingerprint acid? ;) BP

8E45E
08-23-2013, 08:04 AM
True, John.

Now, Studebaker Service Sleuths (The SSS), where in Studebaker Service Literature or procedures is this very topic discussed and cautioned against, lest the part(s) being assembled be damaged by fingerprint acid? ;) BP



Supercharger balls

Craig

BobPalma
08-23-2013, 08:06 AM
supercharger balls. Craig

Bingo! :!: bp

PlainBrownR2
08-23-2013, 03:18 PM
True, John.

Now, Studebaker Service Sleuths (The SSS), where in Studebaker Service Literature or procedures is this very topic discussed and cautioned against, lest the part(s) being assembled be damaged by fingerprint acid? ;) BP


....and that's why I send my superchargers out to have them rebuilt by a professional. Fingerprint acid can do alot of damage to alot of things, particularly the supercharger balls, so I won't mess around with them there balls! :eek:

'66Commander
08-26-2013, 10:57 AM
I found tonight that if you dump enough super glue on your leg, it'll soak right through and cause a nasty chemical burn.

I apologize for laughing, but this is funny.

8E45E
08-26-2013, 11:27 PM
Fingerprint acid can do alot of damage to alot of things, particularly the supercharger balls, so I won't mess around with them there balls! :eek:

And don't play marbles with them, either!

Craig