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DocHemi
08-13-2013, 09:37 PM
My valve cover gaskets were leaking so I decided to go ahead and replace the flaking valve covers. I purchased some finned Studebaker valve covers from SI and when they got here I found they only came as 2 bolt. Is it possible to make it so I can use them? I pulled the original valve cover off to see how the studs were. I didn't want to take them off in case they held the rocker arm somehow. Can they be removed? Do I need to put a bolt there? Will it mess up the torque of the bolts? The valve lash? I guess the factory style grommets won't work in the finned valve covers.

mbstude
08-13-2013, 10:05 PM
You can remove the stud bolts and replace them with regular bolts. Yes, they hold down the rocker assembly. Torque the new bolts and you should be just fine.

irish
08-13-2013, 10:53 PM
You can do what Matthew said or you could drill two more holes in the valve covers, your choice really.

Joe


You can remove the stud bolts and replace them with regular bolts. Yes, they hold down the rocker assembly. Torque the new bolts and you should be just fine.

Warren Webb
08-13-2013, 11:25 PM
Personally I would do what Matthew said. If you drill for the other 2 bolts then, unless you have use of a machine shop, the 2 inside bolts will not have the "flat" machined where the nut will snug against the cover. To me that would look ugly.

DocHemi
08-13-2013, 11:29 PM
I considered that

DocHemi
08-13-2013, 11:36 PM
Think I'll be hitting the hardware store tomorrow for some bolts and digging out my shop manual.

RadioRoy
08-14-2013, 12:03 AM
Make sure you get the right grade of bolts, so the torque settings and stretch properties are the same as the original ones.

sals54
08-14-2013, 01:19 AM
You could get by with grade 5 bolts for those, but it would only be a matter of a few cents to use grade 8. Go 8 if they have them.

Mike Van Veghten
08-14-2013, 08:02 AM
Sal is correct..

The stand hold down isn't a huge deal like the head bolt is. Actually they are "cap" screws. Anyway, the head bolt does 95% percent of the "holding" of the rocker stand to the head.
While I don't recall the exact torque requirement, it isn't that high for these fasteners, either grade will work just fine.

Mike

jclary
08-14-2013, 08:34 AM
The "two-bolt" vs "four-bolt" valve cover change is an excellent "textbook" example of how those engaged in manufacturing, any product, should always be searching for ways to increase "profitability" without compromising "quality." That is not always an easy feat, but in this case, I think it worked as a benefit for all involved.

A good while ago, we engaged in a thread titled "Over-built vs under-built"...and the first four-bolt valves covers were certainly an example of over-built. I don't know exactly which year the change was made, it did not save much in the way of rocker arm assembly, but as far as the valve cover assembly, it instantly saved 50% in rubber seals, washers, and nuts. Then factor in assembly labor, and you see how the benefits compound. On each engine, you have also eliminated four possible oil leak sources.

Unlike how makers of candy bars, cereal, detergent, etc., short-change their customers by downsizing the candy, the box, or amount of product in the box...and charge the same (or more):( ...this little change is how it should be done. Eliminating "over-built" for "appropriately-built" to the benefit of maker and consumer.:!:

gordr
08-14-2013, 09:05 AM
Or you could simply take out the two inner rocker arm stand cap screws, clamp them in a vise, and saw off the the upper stud portion with a hacksaw. Clean off any chips, and put them back. Saves hunting for generic cap screws of the same length and thread length.

PackardV8
08-14-2013, 11:01 AM
JMHO, but the four-bolt covers are much preferable. They're twice as well built, have internal reinforcing ribs, have twice the hold down bolts and thus much less likely to leak. Any conversions I do would go the other way.

jack vines

sals54
08-14-2013, 07:32 PM
Jack, You're right on the stamped valve covers fer sher, but I think with the aluminium (as the English say) covers that Doc is trading up to, the two bolts will work pretty well as long as they are not over-torqued.

DocHemi
08-14-2013, 11:59 PM
Or you could simply take out the two inner rocker arm stand cap screws, clamp them in a vise, and saw off the the upper stud portion with a hacksaw. Clean off any chips, and put them back. Saves hunting for generic cap screws of the same length and thread length.

This I also considered but decided to keep in case I have the originals powder coated and put back on.

sals54
08-15-2013, 09:10 AM
The replacement cap screws, (bolts) are common hardware store items. Easy to find, so do not cut your original bolts. As you said, you may want to use them again later. I personally like the 50s style 4 bolt covers when chromed. They have a great look. Clean and smooth.

gordr
08-15-2013, 10:09 AM
I have a LOT of spares for stuff like this. Sometimes I forget that that others don't.

DocHemi
08-16-2013, 12:12 AM
What have I started?! Got some bolts today and installed them on the passenger side rocker arms. Found that the valve cover didn't clear the generator. I noticed the generator was almost at the end of the mount towards the fan as if the belt was too small. Note to self get a new longer belt. Got the valve cover on and started figuring out what I could use for grommets as the ones that came with the gasket weren't designed for it. I tried some off a Honda but they were too tall and I couldn't get the nut on. I suppose I can spread some gasket sealer around the hole maybe and then put the washer on top. Or I may hit the hardware store again and see what I can find. Since I had the belt off I got distracted by a wobbly fan issue it's had since I got it. Spun it with the fan on and no belt hmm not nice and straight. Popped the fan off and spun the pulley. Still wobbly. pulled that off and thought hey I have a water pump rebuild kit (thought that might be the cause of the wobble), this would be the perfect time for it. Pulled the water pump out and it's pretty nasty. Couldn't tell if that's the cause or not but I'll take it to work tomorrow and use the press to take it apart. Any pointers? I see the process in the shop manual but ya never know what someone may have learned.

DocHemi
09-08-2013, 11:06 PM
Note to self: measure clearance first. I finally finished all my side projects on the engine and went to install the driver side valve cover. Ended up having to take the brake booster off the mount to get the slightly taller valve cover on. When I put the booster back on its just touching the valve cover. Not sure if it'll cause any damage due to the contact but to be save I guess it's time for the Dremel. Probably be wiser to notch the valve cover fin a smidge than the booster.

StudeRich
09-09-2013, 12:58 AM
Well there ya go, trying to be "all fancy"! :D :( Yes those ribbed Aluminum Valve covers look nice, but I would never give up the quality that was built into both types of original Covers.

I never liked the fact that nothing keeps the Gaskets in place on that smooth mounting surface of the Aluminum ones.

I prefer the late type, both with and without Oil Caps started in mid 1960. These have even better "keepers' for the gaskets than the early type which would never stay in the corners.
So for the very best long term leak-proof valve covers, there is no way to beat the Late Factory Covers with Neoprene Gaskets and New Grommets.

DEEPNHOCK
09-09-2013, 09:39 AM
Don't be afraid of the smooth bottom aluminum valve covers...
Just take your gasket (either rubber or cork composite)..
Put some good Permatex Ultra Black gasket adhesive in the valve cover.
Place the gasket on the valve cover.
Set the valve cover on a nice flat surface.
Put a weight on the valve cover.
Let it set up overnight.

The next day...
Put a light 'film' of gasket sealer on the gasket (smooth it with your finger)...
Install the valve cover and torque the nuts to spec.
Let it set up again.... repeat that... Let it set up again...
It will work like a charm.
Oh.... Do the same thing with all the stock stuff, and you will get the same result.
Just be careful the stock stuff hasen't been over torqued and all tweaked all over the place.
There's a big difference between a NOS part and a 50+ year old used part, as far as quality of installation can go.
HTIH
Jeffhttp://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/images/icons/icon6.png


Well there ya go, trying to be "all fancy"! :D :( Yes those ribbed Aluminum Valve covers look nice, but I would never give up the quality that was built into both types of original Covers.

I never liked the fact that nothing keeps the Gaskets in place on that smooth mounting surface of the Aluminum ones.

I prefer the late type, both with and without Oil Caps started in mid 1960. These have even better "keepers' for the gaskets than the early type which would never stay in the corners.
So for the very best long term leak-proof valve covers, there is no way to beat the Late Factory Covers with Neoprene Gaskets and New Grommets.

DocHemi
09-09-2013, 10:16 AM
I kept the originals with the flaking paint as well as the studs for the inner two holes. Someday I'll get them powdercoated and put them back on. I shot some spray adhesive on the gaskets and positioned them on the valve covers how I wanted then flipped them over and let it set up with some weight on top. I'm just bummed about having to notch the driver's side one.

sals54
09-10-2013, 01:07 AM
I kept the originals with the flaking paint as well as the studs for the inner two holes. Someday I'll get them powdercoated and put them back on. I shot some spray adhesive on the gaskets and positioned them on the valve covers how I wanted then flipped them over and let it set up with some weight on top. I'm just bummed about having to notch the driver's side one.

Why damage the valve cover at all ??? All ya gotta do is move the engine over one hole on the frame mounts. Spin the nuts off the bottom of the motor mounts... jack it up to clear the studs.... and push it into the next set of holes a half inch to the left.

Also, on the aluminium valve covers, you may want to rethink using permatex on both sides of the gasket. I like to seal the gasket to the valve cover, then leave the gasket to head side clean. When you have to remove it again, (and you will have to) it'll be WAY easier to prep it for reinstallation.

StudeRich
09-10-2013, 01:54 AM
Quote: "Why damage the valve cover at all ??? All ya gotta do is move the engine over one hole on the frame mounts. Spin the nuts off the bottom of the motor mounts... jack it up to clear the studs.... and push it into the next set of holes a half inch to the left."

Ah Sal, the generator issue will be solved with a longer Fan Belt, now it's hitting the Brake Booster on the Left, so the Engine would have to go to the Right, however L/H Drive Cars are already in the Right Hand Holes and the Left Hand Holes cannot be used anyway or the Engine will hit or be too close to the steering Gear and the driveshaft alignment will be off.

Bottom line, there is no "moving the front of the Engine".

Dick Steinkamp
09-10-2013, 10:11 AM
I'd be tempted to move the booster a smidgen rather than grind on the valve covers.

sals54
09-10-2013, 10:11 PM
I'd be tempted to move the booster a smidgen rather than grind on the valve covers.

Ditto on that point.

DocHemi
09-11-2013, 12:15 AM
Suppose it's a thought. I'll take a look in the daylight. I was trying to avoid drilling more holes in the fenderwell