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View Full Version : Body: Window Regulator Cores for Rebuilding?



BobPalma
07-31-2013, 09:47 PM
Does anyone need window regulator cores for rebuilding?

My '64 Daytona Wagonaire came with an inop RF window due to the little pinion gear on the regulator being stripped. The driven gear on the large, curved arm is fine.

A good used regulator came with the car and I am installing it.

I hate to throw away the old regulator. If someone is rebuilding them, I'll pay the freight to send it to them so it will remain in the Studebaker gene pool.

Thanks. :D BP

StudeRich
07-31-2013, 10:54 PM
Bob if an individual does not claim it, S.I. rebuilds them only with a core, they should buy it, or at least buy the shipping. The rebuilds go for big bucks.

rockne10
07-31-2013, 11:13 PM
My thoughts as well. I have three cores for C/K models I do not want to discard but would prefer to be certain they will contribute to a future resurrection. I can understand if Ed doesn't want to open the coffers to every model or useless cores. He could get burned and overstocked with junk. Maybe he could solicit specific models; or accept contributions at the numerous events he attends.

BobPalma
08-01-2013, 07:44 AM
Bob if an individual does not claim it, S.I. rebuilds them only with a core, they should buy it, or at least buy the shipping. The rebuilds go for big bucks.

Rich, I should have thought of this before going to SI yesterday afternoon! I picked up some new rollers and bits and pieces to finish the job today.

I'll have to check with Ed to see if he needs the core. The P/N in his catalog is 1352602. It appears those he sells of this P/N are NOS units, so this may be one of those items where he has an abundance of NOS and doesn't need any cores. But I'll check.

Meanwhile, if anyone else has any further ideas, please post.

As an aside, I've become sesistive to the dwindling supply of items that will likely never be reproduced. There is no better example than the following: When I "restored" my 1963 Gran Turismo Hawk in 1971/1972 (First Place at Colorado Springs 1973; Senior First the next year in South Bend), I removed the deck lifd overlay because there was a slight dent in it and I found a better one...in 1971. Fortunately, I had the presence of mind to keep the one I removed, and still have it hanging safely, high on the garage wall.

I had a friend looking for a better overlay for his '63 last year, and inquired as to a price. I took detailed photographs of mine and sent the photos to several vendors, asking what would be a fair price for it. They all said it was the nicest one they had seen in years and it would bring, on average, $250 on their table at a Studebaker Swap Meet!

My friend ultimately concluded the one I had wasn't that much better than his (and I agree, although it was better), and opted to do the best he could with his present one, which wasn't at all bad in the big scheme of things.

The point about not discarding things removed is thus well made: Circa 1971, I removed that now-$250 overlay because it wasn't good enough! (And, no, it is not for sale now; the offer to sell was made for a special project for a specific friend. You'll read an article on that car in an up-coming Turning Wheels. Those of you who attended Colorado Springs 2013 might well-imagine the subject car due to its special provenance.;)) :cool: BP

stude1964
08-01-2013, 08:48 AM
Bob
Yes my problem too at not discarding old parts. My Dad & I always thought that it's better to have a part to rebuild than not having a part at all. I've repaired a number of window regulators-most recently on my '64 HT. If I can rebuild a regulator , anyone can. To fix the driver's door regulator I stole parts from a 4 door rear door regulator ,heated & popped out the rivets , replaced needed parts ,put in the old rivets then touched with a spot of brazing. It works great. Of course after I fixed it I found another set of doors in my parts that had good regulators! Well I guess I have spares for my conv.! If I can find them again! Rob in PA.

Corley
08-01-2013, 10:17 AM
Bob The problem with what you advocate, (and I also am an advocate of saving "possibly rebuildable parts"), the problem is storage and inventory. If you hang onto everything, the storage bill will eat your profits up in short order. Not to mention the "I know I have it here somewhere" inventory issues. Therefore, while I agree totally with hanging onto something like your overlay, perhaps a window winder is not in the same category. After all, you can always improvise inside a hidden door, and some guys (like me) are going with after market electric windows, providing even more rebuildable stock. (Actually, I'm not really using after market, just adapting different make electric regulators.) The theory is to be admired, but the reality may not agree.

BobPalma
08-01-2013, 12:40 PM
Well, I have been known to throw parts out, too. Just last week i discarded a standard V8 fuel pump, even with screws around the diaphragm housing.

Phil Harris advises that pumps with laminated actuating arms cannot be rebuilt. That's what this one had, so I tossed it. It was even working when I took it off my convertible to replace it with one of Phil's high-capacity MoPar 318 pumps, but the convertible had enough vapor lock issues from time to time that I figured the pump was weak...and it sure was old. :eek: BP

Spannerbird
11-27-2013, 09:04 AM
I removed the regulators from my doors and of course they were slipping before I removed them. I discovered that the drive axel is bent a little, so I'm thinking of sending them to S.I., to have rebuild (exchanged for a rebuilt set). The amount of money charged seems expensive to me, but maybe there's more work in doing it than I realise.

gordr
11-27-2013, 10:46 AM
I save all the parts I can, but then I live on an acreage, so I can do that, although room to house them is a problem. Might buy some sea cans next year. As far as window regulators go, I will fix a busted front one by robbing parts from a good rear one. I haven't had to fix a hardtop regulator yet, though.

Spannerbird
11-27-2013, 10:48 AM
Good thing I don't own a hardtop.

wittsend
11-27-2013, 11:22 AM
A potential CASO upgrade to a defective manual regulator may exist. I say potential because I have yet to try it. And, with all things CASO, it will not be original. Some of the modern cars use a simple electric window function. It is a pancake (thin) motor that spools a cable. The motor is attached to the interiors upper side of the inner door panel. The cable loops under the window and anchors on the exterior side of the inner door panel. I had an Audi 5000 that had this window configuration (it was the turbo version with "Intended" acceleration). :)

When the cable is unspooled gravity drops the window. When the rotation is reversed the cable spools up raising the window as it pulls the window up (hopefully balanced) from the bottom center. The local Pick Your Part lists the electric regulator at $35 and at their monthly 50% off sale would be $17.50.

I realize this is not everyone's "cup of tea" but there are some that might consider it so I thought I'd throw the idea out there. It would require configuration and trial and error.

Tom

Spannerbird
11-27-2013, 11:44 AM
Thanks for the advice! It's not really what I had planned for it, but now I know it can be done. =)

Paul Keller
11-27-2013, 03:59 PM
Tom,
What year(s) Audi are you refering to?
I've been looking for something that will retro into my '63 Hawk w/out major adapting.
Thanks, Paul TK

Paul Keller
11-27-2013, 04:03 PM
Tom,
What year(s) Audi are you refering to?
I've been looking for something that will retro into my '63 Hawk w/out major adapting.
Re: 62-64 Hawk regulators, I "rebuilt" one (VERY time consuming) and discovered that it was not the pinion that was the problem, but rather the mechanical connection between the crank spindle and the pinion - It appears to be one piece, but is really two pieces.
Thanks, Paul TK

wittsend
11-27-2013, 05:01 PM
Paul,

My Audi was a 1986. I say this somewhat embarrassed that I just looked at the Audi regulators on Google images and they do not look like the way I remember them. So, perhaps I just mis-read where and how the cable was run??? My apology. It was about 15 years ago I had that car. I'm still sure I saw a configuration like I described - on some car. If I ever see the correct donor car I'll report back.

Tom
Tom

WinM1895
11-27-2013, 05:27 PM
I'll have to check with Ed to see if he needs the core. The P/N in his catalog is 1352602. :confused:
You better check with Mr. Ed, as this part number is only listed for 1963.

1352602 .. Right Front Door Window Regulator: 1963 Y-F-P

1360426 .. Right Front Door Window Regulator: 1964 Y-F-P / I don't have a 65/66 catalog, so it may be the same.

What I find interesting is...the right (passenger) side regulator failed. Usually, it's the left (drivers) side that fails, as it gets far more usage.

A common problem with these regulators is...the (sold by itself) nylon window roller that attaches the arm of the regulator to the window channel breaks, causing the regulator to bind up or the window to fall down into the door.

Same roller as Ford (COAB-6423240-B) used on many '60's vehicles including 1961/69 F series trucks, '65/66 Mustang. At one time every auto parts store carried it.

jimmijim8
11-30-2013, 02:30 PM
My 2 AC brand v8 fuel pumps having the laminated arm assembly were just recently remanufactured by Dave Thiebeault. cheers jimmijim.
Well, I have been known to throw parts out, too. Just last week i discarded a standard V8 fuel pump, even with screws around the diaphragm housing.

Phil Harris advises that pumps with laminated actuating arms cannot be rebuilt. That's what this one had, so I tossed it. It was even working when I took it off my convertible to replace it with one of Phil's high-capacity MoPar 318 pumps, but the convertible had enough vapor lock issues from time to time that I figured the pump was weak...and it sure was old. :eek: BP