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View Full Version : Manifold and other castings - Fast and Cheap(er)?



Dan White
09-04-2007, 02:18 PM
Saw this on the web. Hey Ted maybe we should try these guys the next time, maybe a cheaper and faster way to go??

http://www.zcorp.com/products/zcast.asp


Dan White
64 R1 GT
64 R2 GT

Mike Van Veghten
09-04-2007, 05:34 PM
Buy all the work that Teds guy has done so far and give it to the Zcorp. guys to finish.
I know Teds guy(s) have the interior and exterior patterns complete. Don't know about the actual molds. The patterns look very nice...(have pictures), that doesn't make the manifold usable though!

Mike

55studeman
09-04-2007, 08:30 PM
That is cool!! Wish I had a buddy with one, then I could squeeze some "free" time on it:)

Best Regards,
Eric West
"The Speedster Kid"
Sunny Northern California
Where the roads don't freeze over and the heat doesn't kill you.
And an open road is yours to have -only during non-commute rush hours 9am-4pm and 7pm to 7am (Ha, ha, ha)
55 Speedster "Lemon/Lime" (Beautiful)
55 President State Sedan (Rusty original, but runs great and reliable)

gordr
09-04-2007, 10:03 PM
Sounds like this process would be the cat's a** for duplicating quite a number of NLA Studebaker parts, like '53 grille shells, or '61 Lark tail light lenses.

I wonder if there are 3D scanners out there that can read a prototype part and render it into digital form?

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

Michidan
09-05-2007, 11:18 AM
The scanning technology and point cloud software already exist, several companies do this.
The download to a rapid prototype machine is also not hard. Stereolithography has been around a long time, there are other variants that squirt plastic layers or solidify powders. (even the local community collee has one).
Some of these "3D printed" cores and cavities can last dozens of times if you are shooting plastic into them. But for pouring metal, I assume you get one and the mold is shot. You ruin it getting the part out. So then you "3D print' another. Prety hard to get any sort of volume going.

Dan
52 hardtop
www.studebakerhardtop.com

Mike Van Veghten
09-05-2007, 01:55 PM
This is true. Also Stereolithography is not exactly cheap. BUT, just as their add states, make up a prototype, test it, modify it as required, make one more with the modifications to verify it does or doesn't work..."then" have a regular casting shop work off of that finished information.

Mike

Dan White
09-05-2007, 02:10 PM
Yep we use SLA (stereo lithography) patterns for our contract investment cast work only for protos. But this is a lot cheaper than investing in hard tooling only to find out that you need to modify something or change something first. That is why when I saw this it would be great to make proto manifolds test them and then get the kinks out before going to hard tooling for sand cast cores. Yes you only get one shot with the SLA approach, but it is fast. We can deliver parts to a customer in less than 4 weeks with SLA going from a solid model CAD file to final prototype (metal) part.

Dan White
64 R1 GT
64 R2 GT

Scott
09-05-2007, 02:55 PM
My company makes rapid prototypes in ABS plastic. The resolution is good for larger parts of an inch or more, but for very small parts the SLA or polyjet style machines are better. We are in the process of trying to obtain a polyjet (Objet) machine right now. I think only the Zcorp and Stratasys FDM machines (like the one we own) can do something as large an intake manifold, though.

gordr
09-05-2007, 09:37 PM
quote:Originally posted by Michidan

The scanning technology and point cloud software already exist, several companies do this.
The download to a rapid prototype machine is also not hard. Stereolithography has been around a long time, there are other variants that squirt plastic layers or solidify powders. (even the local community collee has one).
Some of these "3D printed" cores and cavities can last dozens of times if you are shooting plastic into them. But for pouring metal, I assume you get one and the mold is shot. You ruin it getting the part out. So then you "3D print' another. Prety hard to get any sort of volume going.

Dan
52 hardtop
www.studebakerhardtop.com


Well, Dan, maybe that IS the answer, then. Let's face it, there are a number of Stude-specific parts out there for which there is some demand, but there are few, if any, for which there is a very large demand, sufficient to justify the cost of conventional tooling. Seems to me this rapid prototyping technology could be used to manufacture some types of Stude parts on an on-demand basis. Finished parts might be expensive, but they would always be available. The manufacturer's "inventory" would consist of bits on DVD-roms.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

Scott
09-06-2007, 10:50 AM
If we get the Objet machine in our office I would be able to build one-off lenses in clear material which can be rit dyed to be red or any color. The trick would be getting drawings fo the lens so I could create a 3d cad model.