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View Full Version : Does this look weird? Advice needed



showbizkid
09-03-2007, 08:53 PM
Putting in the upper outer pin on my suspension today, I followed the manual's instructions carefully and even counted to make sure I was tightening each metal bushing by the same number of turns. But somehow, the kingpin looks off-center - notice th grease seals in the pic below.

I actually installed this pin twice; the first time the off-center was even more noticeable, so I backed both bushings completely out, re-centered the pin and carefully counted turns again. It came out better, but it's still not even (like the bottom pin is).

Did I do something wrong, or am I worrying about nothing? If I need to correct this, what do I do? I really don't want to screw this up [8]

http://i132.photobucket.com/albums/q26/clarknovak/Front%20Suspension/DSCN1012.jpg

As you can see, both bushings are torqued right up to the ears, but one is definitely compressing the grease seal big time and the other is just meeting it.

Thanks guys!


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Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com
www.studebakersandiego.com

GTtim
09-03-2007, 09:27 PM
The centering (or not) of the top of the kingpin controls the camber adjustment. When it is aligned it may or may not be more centered. The most important thing is that the ears of the upper control arm have been kept apart by the specified amount when the cap nuts were tightened so that the upper pin can pivot freely on the internal threads. This will allow grease to follow the threads and keep the pin from binding and premature failure.

Tim K.
'64 R2 GT Hawk

showbizkid
09-03-2007, 09:56 PM
Tim, it's not the up-and-down centering I'm worried about - I understand the cam action of the pin. But if you look at the grease seals on either side of the kingpin, the left one is much more compressed than the right one. THAT's what I'm worried about - that the pin is not centered between the bushings, and that the left one has taken more threads than the right one.

I did use the spreader tool from Chuck Collins.


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Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com
www.studebakersandiego.com

GTtim
09-03-2007, 10:08 PM
Yes, it is the front/back or side to side centering I'm talking about. I forget if it is caster or camber, but one of them will determine the position of the top of the pin, front to back, and that is that. It almost looks like one of the bushings is longer than the other, but that isn't the case, right? I see now after looking in the book, that I mean to be talking about the caster adjustment.

Tim K.
'64 R2 GT Hawk

showbizkid
09-03-2007, 10:50 PM
OH!!!! You mean, maybe I need to put a hex wrench in and rotate the pin so that it's centered? I never understood that description in the manual!


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Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com
www.studebakersandiego.com

gordr
09-03-2007, 11:50 PM
quote:Originally posted by showbizkid

OH!!!! You mean, maybe I need to put a hex wrench in and rotate the pin so that it's centered? I never understood that description in the manual!


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com
www.studebakersandiego.com


Yes, that's exactly what you need to do. Caster adjustment and camber adjustment are both obtained by turning the upper outer pin by means of an Allen wrench (slack off the pich bolt!) Caster is a function of the fore/aft position of the kingpin top. That is controlled by how many turns the upper pin is turned to screw the kingpin top ahead or behind. Camber is controlled by the in/out position of the kingpin top, which is controlled by the clock position of the eccentric center section of the upper inner pin.

What you want to do is set caster first, and then turn the pin whichever direction requires the least amount of movement to obtain the correct camber. The complete range of camber adjustment can be obtained in 1/2 turn of the pin; it takes several turns to get the full range of caster. You ought to be able to set the camber EXACTLY on spec; caster may off a tad. Don't worry, that's the nature of the design.

BTW, nice clean work!

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

StudeRich
09-04-2007, 01:47 AM
Yes Clark; Gordr is right on, do not put extra wear on the arms and bushings by changing it, when it is aligned, it will not be centered anyway! It is fine. [^]

You want some Negative Caster and a lot of Positive Camber to make it drive OK to the alignment shop, it gets +1/2 on the right and +3/4 CAMBER on the left, but it never seems possible to get very much over that. So when assembling them, I put the inner shafts in the outboard position and max out the eccentric adjustment in the positive (outboard) position for the (short) drive! [:0]

It's looking good Clark![^]

StudeRich
Studebakers Northwest
Ferndale, WA

showbizkid
09-04-2007, 09:02 AM
Thanks guys! Now I get it!


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com
www.studebakersandiego.com