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avantilover
07-17-2013, 08:19 AM
What is the quality of the 1966 vehicles like?

Am thinking of perhaps getting a Cruiser and not sure of that year as the only one I know of is in Qld, although I believe Bill Pressler's former car was in Victoria with some character named Brian Greenall (smile).

Just that I know nothing about these vehicles.

Opinions anyone?

2R5
07-17-2013, 08:43 AM
Nothing wrong with 66s , by the way Bill's former car isn't a Cruiser its a Daytona.

avantilover
07-17-2013, 08:48 AM
Thx, my apologies to Bill for the wrong name.

rockne10
07-17-2013, 09:27 AM
Other than having the same rust issues as previous Lark configurations, a suspension design that didn't change for fifteen years and the dependable GM power, Studebaker was installing some of their finest interiors in the '66 Cruiser. It made for luxurious interiors but few additional sales.

BobPalma
07-17-2013, 11:02 AM
John, you may also be thinking of Bill Pressler's 1966 Daytona Sport Sedan. It is also "over there," with an interior almost as luxurious as a Cruiser's. :cool: BP

57pack
07-17-2013, 11:04 AM
When you figure it's been 47 years since they were manufactured and how few were made... It's amazing how many are still around.

2R5
07-17-2013, 12:00 PM
We have 33 Daytonas on the registry out of 873 built ( less than 4 % ) and a lot to those are not road worthy....I don't call that a lot !

2moredoors
07-17-2013, 12:17 PM
Other than having the same rust issues as previous Lark configurations, a suspension design that didn't change for fifteen years and the dependable GM power, Studebaker was installing some of their finest interiors in the '66 Cruiser. It made for luxurious interiors but few additional sales.
I have a '66 Cruiser and the interior is quite well appointed for a car in its original price range. The materials used were similar to the better materials in Buicks, Oldsmobiles and maybe even Cadillacs. It is a comfortable riding car and even without power steering it handles well. The lighter "McKinnon" V8 engine I think adds to its drivability. Being a 4 door the wheelbase is longer than the 2 door models and have plenty of back seat space.

StudeRich
07-17-2013, 01:13 PM
We have 33 Daytonas on the registry out of 873 built ( less than 4 % ) and a lot to those are not road worthy....I don't call that a lot !

I can't agree with this, because first of all we were talking about CRUISERS, and secondly '66 Cruisers WAY outnumber '66 Daytonas in numbers built and especially numbers saved, there sure seems to be a LOT of these Cruisers compared to the number built. :)

2R5
07-17-2013, 01:49 PM
Well Rich , if you notice John was talking about Bill's previous car which he thought was a Cruiser....its a Daytona ...so it depends on how you read the original post.

avantilover
07-17-2013, 02:11 PM
Thanks all for the information, just seemed a "fully loaded" '66 Cruiser would be a good example of our last year, the best of the last if you will. Hopefully I'll see some '66's at a future Aussie National Meet or the NZ one I'm attending next Easter.

JimC
07-17-2013, 02:21 PM
I personally would love a fully loaded '66 Cruiser. Ideally, one as close to the end of production as possible, just for the historic significance. Owning one of Studebaker's last cars would be pretty cool.

studegary
07-17-2013, 02:37 PM
A couple of memories of 1966 Cruisers;
A neighbor bought a new 1966 Cruiser with six & AT. He got it to replace the 1957 Silver Hawk V8 that he bought new. I remember the Cruiser as being in the shop for small repairs a lot more than the Hawk was.
The 1966 Cruisers had a nice appearing interior, but many, including me, did not find that bench seat to be comfortable. Seats fit different people in different ways and different people like different seats. I remember that the shop had a 1966 bench seat for customers to sit on while waiting. That seat came out of a fairly new 1966 Cruiser. It was replaced with an older Studebaker seat. The customer was much happier with the older (c.1964) seat.

Roscomacaw
07-17-2013, 04:42 PM
2R5 says: "We have 33 Daytonas on the registry out of 873 built ( less than 4 % ) and a lot to those are not road worthy....I don't call that a lot ! "

I think there's a better survival rate of '58 Packard wagons, is there not???

thunderations
07-17-2013, 04:57 PM
I think that the low number of 1966 Studebakers built, is in itself, is a reason to collect at least one. I have to admit that I wasn't looking for a 66 when I got mine, but I'm very happy with the car. At nearly 50 years old, it still gets around well on long trips and around town. My wife even likes to drive it, so there you go. As far as quality, I think Studebaker quality was as good as any manufacturer. Maybe not as plush or as stylish as others, but still good quality.

Scott
07-17-2013, 05:03 PM
I've owned two and I think they are good, but it's really hard to tell how good they could be when they are this old and have had so many repairs and so much use. It's hard to judge any car when it's not even close to being like new.

jimmijim8
07-17-2013, 05:33 PM
this is what I think they mean by the saying. " there's a seat for every asse and an asse for every seat" I think jimmijim
A couple of memories of 1966 Cruisers;
A neighbor bought a new 1966 Cruiser with six & AT. He got it to replace the 1957 Silver Hawk V8 that he bought new. I remember the Cruiser as being in the shop for small repairs a lot more than the Hawk was.
The 1966 Cruisers had a nice appearing interior, but many, including me, did not find that bench seat to be comfortable. Seats fit different people in different ways and different people like different seats. I remember that the shop had a 1966 bench seat for customers to sit on while waiting. That seat came out of a fairly new 1966 Cruiser. It was replaced with an older Studebaker seat. The customer was much happier with the older (c.1964) seat.

57pack
07-17-2013, 06:39 PM
We have 33 Daytonas on the registry out of 873 built ( less than 4 % ) and a lot to those are not road worthy....I don't call that a lot !

I apologize, I didn't follow the original post. I was thinking of the total 1966 production run. I'm sorry I didn't make that clear.

Warren Webb
07-17-2013, 07:57 PM
My Cruiser needs interior being it was made in all vinyl but the design is great & those with fabric interior that have been kept well would look good in the showroom today.

By the way, I just checked & my Cruiser still isn't listed in Mark's registry even though I've tried online & sent all the info via snail mail.
http://www.65cruiser.com/Registry/Registry.htm

Scott
07-17-2013, 08:28 PM
Hey, mine's not on there either and I was sure Mark had contacted me. :confused:

avantilover
07-18-2013, 12:38 AM
Thanks one and all for the interesting information.

crusinsusin
07-18-2013, 06:54 AM
My Cruiser needs interior being it was made in all vinyl but the design is great & those with fabric interior that have been kept well would look good in the showroom today.

By the way, I just checked & my Cruiser still isn't listed in Mark's registry even though I've tried online & sent all the info via snail mail.
http://www.65cruiser.com/Registry/Registry.htm


Hey, mine's not on there either and I was sure Mark had contacted me. :confused:

My 64 isn't there either. Is Mark ok?

2moredoors
07-18-2013, 07:32 AM
By the way, I just checked & my Cruiser still isn't listed in Mark's registry even though I've tried online & sent all the info via snail mail.
http://www.65cruiser.com/Registry/Registry.htm
I have made several attempts to have my Cruiser added to the registry, perhaps Mark has given up the project.

stude dude
07-18-2013, 09:35 AM
I was told by Dennis Lambert years ago that it was expected that Canadian production would offer better quality of materials, particularly with regards to interior trim; seat trim, foam, windlace, dash mouldings, etc.

The Hamilton line also moved a lot slower than South Bend and the Canadians had far better knowledge of body rust proofing.

Chris.