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38 stud
08-20-2007, 11:23 AM
I am in the process of rebuilding the rear brake cylinders on my 38 President. I have built myself a pressure bleeder so my wife will not have to assist me in the bleeding process. Because this model is equipped with a hill holder I was doing some reading about the process of bleeding the brakes. Apparently there is a bleed screw on some vintage hill holders. Is there a bleed screw on a 1938 Studebaker equipped with a hill holder as well?

Thanks,

Jim

StudeRich
08-20-2007, 12:59 PM
Yes, it is the same unit up to 1960 on Lark and 1964 on Hawk, only slightly diff. on '61-66' Lark Types and Avanti.

StudeRich
Studebakers Northwest
Ferndale, WA

38 stud
08-20-2007, 01:28 PM
Thanks again StudeRich,

Unfortunitly I will have to remove the whole brake cylinder and hill holder unit to get the bleed screw loose.

Jim

Jim Beckman
08-21-2007, 09:35 AM
I've got the master cylinder assembly from my 1951 Commander taken apart right now. In a previous thread, somebody suggested replacing the hill holder bleed screw with the same size hex bolt, since it will be a *lot* easier to loosen it next time. It's pretty much impossible to get a screwdriver blade into the bleed screw when the unit is on the car.

Jim Beckman

Dwain G.
08-21-2007, 12:02 PM
A photo in the 1938 shop manual shows a square head bleed screw in the top of hill holder. I hope you're that lucky!

http://home.comcast.net/~jdwain/63.63.jpg
Dwain G.

DEEPNHOCK
08-21-2007, 09:54 PM
Here's a swag for you.
Bleed the rear brakes with the rear of the car jacked up (so the hill holder ball is in the forward position).
Then bleed the front brakes with the front end jacked up.
Power bleeding is swell (if you have the equipment), and a vaccum bleeder gizmo will work (and pump your forearm muscles up big time)..
You can do it!
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by 38 stud

I am in the process of rebuilding the rear brake cylinders on my 38 President. I have built myself a pressure bleeder so my wife will not have to assist me in the bleeding process. Because this model is equipped with a hill holder I was doing some reading about the process of bleeding the brakes. Apparently there is a bleed screw on some vintage hill holders. Is there a bleed screw on a 1938 Studebaker equipped with a hill holder as well?

Thanks,

Jim



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Brooklet, Georgia
DEEPNHOCK at Gmail.com
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38 stud
08-22-2007, 10:14 AM
I took a look at the hill holder yesterday. I can not see any bleed screw on this particular vintage. It attaches at the back of the master cylinder with a large bolt. One brake line is coming out the side for the back brakes. And another line is coming right off the very top going to the front brakes. I would assume because the front brake line comes from highest point of the hill holder any air would be evacuated after bleeding the front brakes.

Jim

Laemmle
08-25-2007, 04:42 PM
On my Avanti, the no-rol unit has no bleeder screw, one has to "break" the line going to the unit to bleed it.....:(


quote:Originally posted by 38 stud

I took a look at the hill holder yesterday. I can not see any bleed screw on this particular vintage. It attaches at the back of the master cylinder with a large bolt. One brake line is coming out the side for the back brakes. And another line is coming right off the very top going to the front brakes. I would assume because the front brake line comes from highest point of the hill holder any air would be evacuated after bleeding the front brakes.

Jim

38 stud
08-27-2007, 02:30 PM
I bleed them this past weekend. The pressure bleeder I built worked perfectly, much to my wifeís happiness. I also had to adjust the pedal height a little, now I have good firm pedal starting near the top of the stroke. Now I noticed the front brakes are rubbing a little bit when I turn them by hand. I was able to get the passenger side freed up but the driverís side still rubs a little :(. I think I will be rebuilding them this winter now that I had such good success doing the back brakes. :)

Jim

DEEPNHOCK
08-28-2007, 07:20 PM
Congrats!
Jeff[8D]

38 stud
07-14-2010, 01:12 PM
Well here we go again.......I have finally got around to rebuilding the front brakes on my 38 President. I seem to be having some issues getting the pads adjusted to the shoes.

When I first completed the install I adjusted the upper cams to just touching the drums. I backed them off slightly. I then turned the lower adjusters to just touching the shoes. I bleed the system and I noticed the drums no longer turn freely when the pedal is released.

I tried making further adjustments but could not get the brakes to fully release the drums. Last night I decided to back off the push rod on the master cylinder. I did that and now I have a very soft pedal.

Can someone provide the instructions to properly adjust the shoes? And the push rod between the pedal and master cylinder?

Thanks,

Jim

nvonada
07-14-2010, 05:10 PM
OK, now I am a little worried. I have never bled my '41's hill holder. When I rebuilt the master cylinder I flushed it out with clean fluid then put it back in. Just so I did not have any problems I adjusted the linkage so it does nothing. I have bled the brakes as usual since then and never seemed to have a problem but the pedal has never been what you would call super firm. Have I been screwing this up for years?

studebakerkid
07-14-2010, 05:22 PM
On old style brakes with cams you need to adjust them out evenly instead of just at the top or bottom. Even if you do the brakes will rub a bit once they are adjusted and blead but as long as the wheels rotate with not much bind you will be fine. Once you drive around the block a few times the linings will grind down a bit anyhow and in a few hundred or thousand miled depending on how you drive yo will have to adjust the brakes again once the shoes arc in more.

jclary
07-14-2010, 05:55 PM
When I first completed the install I adjusted the upper cams to just touching the drums. I backed them off slightly. I then turned the lower adjusters to just touching the shoes. I bleed the system and I noticed the drums no longer turn freely when the pedal is released.
Thanks,

Jim

Jim,
I have not yet had the good fortune to own a 38. My oldest Studebaker is a '48, so keep this in mind regarding the validity of my advice. When adjusting either the cam shoes or the star wheel type on my Stuedbakers, I don't just adjust until I make contact with the drums. I adjust until I lock them solid. Then I back them off until they turn with just slight friction. It is my belief that this gives the best geometric mechanical position for braking contact and action. (sorry about the verbage but I can't help myself)
Give that a try to see if it helps. Also, don't forget to make sure the tiny breather hole in the master cylinder cap is clean so that the reservoir can breathe to prevent a vacuum from developing in the master cylinder.