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rockinhawk
08-14-2012, 01:36 PM
We so often hear that we have become an old folks club, and that SDC will die with us. I see more and more Young people at our meets and becoming in volved with Studebakers and SDC. Every one here knows Chris and Matthew who are our flag bearers amoung the youth, but I recall several stories of youngsters getting involved lately. From getting Drivers License in a Studebaker to Girls drag racing. I would like to get a head count and give the young folks some recognition.
If you are under 25 and interested in Studebakers or know someone who is, Please sign in and maybe tell us a little about your selves.
I'll start the ball rolling with my 3 grandsons
Matthew Burnette, 22, 59 Scotsman
Zack Baxley,13, 54 coupe
Joshua Pair,12, 60 Lark HT.

FlatheadGeo
08-14-2012, 02:10 PM
What a great idea!!!!!!

Chris Pile
08-14-2012, 03:29 PM
We used to have program to give special T-shirts to SDC members under 21.
Bondo Billy used to sell them.
I know we gave away quite a few at Zone Meets.
Do we still have that program?

Avantidon
08-14-2012, 03:50 PM
We also need to have a junior membership for these young people that will give them access to our older people and their own copy of Turning Wheels as well as a few other perks. Bet it might help. Seen it done before and is very successful.

studegary
08-14-2012, 04:54 PM
We also need to have a junior membership for these young people that will give them access to our older people and their own copy of Turning Wheels as well as a few other perks. Bet it might help. Seen it done before and is very successful.

SDC has this. It is called: Student & Young Adult Membership (to 22 years old).

JRoberts
08-14-2012, 05:27 PM
We used to have program to give special T-shirts to SDC members under 21.
Bondo Billy used to sell them.
I know we gave away quite a few at Zone Meets.
Do we still have that program?

The 21 and Under Program was something that Bob Shaw, Ed Reynolds and I came up with back a few years ago. We also had great support from Bill Glass who printed the T-shirts. The idea was that folks putting on Studebaker meets where there would be a car show as part of it (Zone Meets, IM's, major meets, etc.) would contact me and we would get 21 and Under shirts to anyone who, naturally, was 21 and Under who brought a Studebaker to that particular meet. The good part of this program was the smiles it put on young people who got the shirts. It was great. The bad thing was the almost total lack of support from the SDC membership. Ed posted informaiton in the President's Column about this. It was explained on this forum and elsewhere, yet very few organizers of Studebaker events chose to contact us for the shirts or the mail in cards for t-shirts for the folks 21 and under who particiapted. When Ed left office there was no support for the SDC leadership to continue the program. i contacted tghe following president and never got a response. Thus another potential way to recognize younger folks in the SDC went down the tubes.

cultural infidel
08-14-2012, 05:50 PM
Well I still consider myself part of the younger crowd but I am 28.

rockinhawk
08-14-2012, 06:29 PM
I agree with and supported all the youth oriented programs. and would like to see more. I enjoy seeing kids participate. that's why I tried hard to keep my grandsons Interested. But then I enjoy having them around. I found out if you give them a car, they will hang out with Grandpa.

But let's get some names on the list! So far we only have my 3. Cul, Maybe I should have set the age at 30? But anyone under 50 is a young person to me.

starliner62
08-14-2012, 06:36 PM
My son James has become an official member of the SDC. He said that he wanted his own membership, especially after being a part of the International meet. I'm trying to get him to start posting here. He will be seventeen in a couple of months. That makes four ? so far.

starliner62
08-14-2012, 06:40 PM
Well I still consider myself part of the younger crowd but I am 28.

Yea, you're probably still a little wet behind the ears!!!:cool:

Lou Van Anne
08-14-2012, 06:41 PM
When I kick the bucket, my Nephew gets my Avanti. I wonder why he keeps dropping banana peels in front of me?

mbstude
08-14-2012, 06:57 PM
I'll start the ball rolling with my 3 grandsons
Matthew Burnette, 22, 59 Scotsman


I've been thinking about getting that Scotsman up to Fayetteville and twisting wrenches again. And buy a welder to fix what I can of the original body. Trying to figure out a way to make it happen, I miss that truck.

I'll add a couple more. Dylan Wills who sometimes posts here is 17 or 18 and lives in WA State. He has a '61 wagon daily driver and a couple others. Raymond Jahnsen from Missouri doesn't post on the forum, but he's 15 or 16 and has a Champ pickup. His dad's a brick mason and a farmer and has a few Stude trucks that he uses on the farm. John McCall's son Mathew, also in Missouri is 19 and is building an R3 powered Lark. But given that the McCalls live and breathe these cars, it's not a surprise. I met Dick Clemen's 16 year old grandson Mikey at South Bend, he and Dick are building a '65 Cruiser for his first car.

There's quite a few young guys out there with Studes.

rockinhawk
08-14-2012, 07:04 PM
I've been thinking about getting that Scotsman up to Fayetteville and twisting wrenches again. And buy a welder to fix what I can of the original body. Trying to figure out a way to make it happen, I miss that truck.

I'll add a couple more. Dylan Wills who sometimes posts here is 17 or 18 and lives in WA State. He has a '61 wagon daily driver and a couple others. Raymond Jahnsen from Missouri doesn't post on the forum, but he's 15 or 16 and has a Champ pickup. His dad's a brick mason and a farmer and has a few Stude trucks that he uses on the farm. John McCall's son Mathew, also in Missouri is 19 and is building an R3 powered Lark. But given that the McCalls live and breathe these cars, it's not a surprise. I met Dick Clemen's 16 year old grandson Mikey at South Bend, he and Dick are building a '65 Cruiser for his first car.

There's quite a few young guys out there with Studes.

That gives us 8 boys? Where are the girls?

I know of a couple more boys, but am waiting for them to post themselves. You don't have to be a member... Just interested.

Jeb
08-14-2012, 07:29 PM
My son Hunter is 18 and owns a '51 bulletnose four door street rod. He didn't join because we don't have any Studebaker specific functions here, though he joined the local car club. If there was something special for young Stude addicts he might reconsider. I'll ask him.

crazylark
08-14-2012, 08:02 PM
me im only twelve and i own a lark(lark nerds LOL).

Sdude
08-14-2012, 08:10 PM
I posted a thread about my granddaughter, Sydney already but here's the information again.

Sydney is 16 and the 1965 Commander is her first car. She barely reaches the pedals but she loves the car. She even handles the "no power steering" with ease. She is a member of SDC.

16868 16869 The second picture is my son, Jon Jr who previously owned the Commander. He had some problems with it and was happy to hand it down to his neice, who's father was able to get it running again. Jon Jr loved driving it while he had it.

Sam Ensley
08-14-2012, 09:40 PM
There's a young fellow in sourth Georgia, or at least lower Georgia whom I have seen at meets. I can't think of his name, but he would be about seventeen, now. He seems to have Studebakers in his blood. I must include my grandson, Samuel, who is five years old. He loves to ride in Studebakers and loves to help take parts off them. I could never get his daddy interested in them like he is.

stude-sled
08-14-2012, 09:58 PM
My daughter has a 1962 Lark. She is 13 and had a great time at the IM buying parts for the restro.

58PackardWagon
08-14-2012, 10:22 PM
I have two boys and one girl. The boys have zero interest in my fleet. My daughter on the other hand is always wanting to help for hours and go for rides.
Everytime we go into the pole barn she is asking if she can have the 62 Daytona as her first car. She won't be driving for 4 more years...time will tell.

rockinhawk
08-14-2012, 10:26 PM
So we are up to 10 boys and 3 girls. I think we can do better than that.

Sam, you may be thinking of Alex Nelson from the Macon area. I was waiting for him to chime in on his own.

Steve T
08-14-2012, 11:09 PM
Hey Matthew--

Did you mention the guy who now has your old '58 Commander?

Eric Harnett here acquired his '66 Cruiser and joined SDC and the Hamilton Chapter when he was 19, so would've qualified at least at that point; he'd be 23 now. (A year or two back he was talking about something, I forget what, and uttered the phrase "When I was much younger..." I stopped him, glared at him and said, "You've never been much younger!", which amused him considerably and has since become a bit of a running joke among some of us in the Chapter!)

Great thread idea.

S.

Steve T
08-14-2012, 11:14 PM
...Remembered another one, guy named Crockett who has one of the Chevybakers (a '65 F-body, I think) beautifully rodded...have never actually seen the car but coveted it instantly I saw a photo of it.

S.

Nelsen Motorsports
08-14-2012, 11:18 PM
So we are up to 10 boys and 3 girls. I think we can do better than that.

Sam, you may be thinking of Alex Nelson from the Macon area. I was waiting for him to chime in on his own.

I'm here and my Stude adventures have already been incredible, not to mention scary. My 54 is still awaiting the rebuilt engine to be installed and fired, long story, but after football it will slowly turn into a daily driver. I think I am the only one of my friends who spent all he made this summer to build an engine.

Chris_Dresbach
08-14-2012, 11:44 PM
I was going to mention Dylan Wills but Matt beat me to it. He seems to represent the under 21 croud in the northwester corner of the U.S.

evilhawk
08-15-2012, 12:10 AM
Well Im 33 now, but was 21 when I bought my Hawk. Sadly I did little work to it in the 12 years Ive owned it. I wish someone told me I could have gotten a free t-shirt when I first joined the SDC back in 2000!

candbstudebakers
08-15-2012, 12:15 AM
Don't forget my grandson Clayton, he is 17 now but has been a member since he was 6, he has been to his share of International meets (8) and lots of zone meets,he has all the cars I own one of these days right now he is working on a rather nice running 62 GT for a driver of every day, as of now he wants to go to advance schooling to work on older cars mainly Studebakers.

http://i691.photobucket.com/albums/vv271/canbstudebakers/IM001580.jpg

age 3 here standing along a 289 engine in what he has always called his garage 5 bays and 2 stories

SN-60
08-15-2012, 12:31 AM
I told My Grand Daughter She's getting the '55 Speedster when I'm through with it......it does make me a little uneasy though that She keeps asking Me how e-bay works!

Jeff T.
08-15-2012, 09:26 AM
My daughter Eliza is 6 and is really into Studebakers. When we watched a new YouTube video on Studebaker parts she uttered "wow, cool" many times when the screen was full of Hawks, Larks and Avantis. She also likes to help as much as she has her own welding helmet so she can watch while I'm welding.

Eliza is eager to learn and that will come with time:)

Jeff T.

Avantidon
08-15-2012, 09:57 AM
I forgot Gary that we had one. I guess the Marketing Committee needs to dust it off and promote the heck out of it.

woodysrods
08-15-2012, 10:31 AM
We have a young man named Thomas in our club who is very keen. I think Thomas is 16 yrs old.
He does not post here but I think he lurks.
Are you out there Danial/Thomas???
Good Roads
Brian

kmac530
08-15-2012, 10:35 AM
I am happy that there are some younger members. That is great and I love watching them smile as they build a project. It is a bit sad that of the 13 or 14 youth that have been named only like 2 have actually posted it themselves.

I do not think he was under 21 but there was a young guy here who was building that SUPER COOL white gasser Lark with the Sinclair dinosaur on it. I will remember his name in a minute, my brain is malfunctioning today

Sdude
08-15-2012, 03:41 PM
I am happy that there are some younger members. That is great and I love watching them smile as they build a project. It is a bit sad that of the 13 or 14 youth that have been named only like 2 have actually posted it themselves.

My grandaughter loves her Studebaker but I am not fooling myself into believing that she's into Studebakers like I am. I continue to try to get her interested in things we do but she has her own activities and I am happy to settle for the fact that she drives a Stude. I seriously doubt that she will ever be into it like her grandpa.

Perhaps by just driving the car around her friends, a seed wil be planted in the mind of another youth. Every little exposure will add up.

DEEPNHOCK
08-15-2012, 03:50 PM
I never counted, but I have hundred's of pic's of kids setting in the Yellow POS over the years...
(Over 500 perdy young gal pic's:rolleyes:...but they don't count)...
"The Black Car" has about 30 kid pic's so far..

That's my motivational tool for membership....
(I have a personal Ohio Geroge Montgomery kid experience that got me started on that...:!:)

We all try to motivate youth in our own way....
But motivate we should always try to do!
Jeffhttp://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/images/icons/icon6.png

http://inlinethumb01.webshots.com/48000/1512338818038087468S600x600Q85.jpg

FlatheadGeo
08-15-2012, 04:11 PM
A great idea has turned into a wonderful thread!!!!

rockinhawk
08-15-2012, 04:44 PM
If my count is accurate we have 15 boys and 6 girls. I think maybe our club is in pretty good hands.

dnevin
08-15-2012, 09:07 PM
How many of those, however, came into the club without having a family member bring them into the hobby?

Please do not take this as a negative criticism in any way--I'm thrilled to see these things pass along through family members. But I think we could probably do a better job of welcoming a young owner who happened to buy an old Stude because it was different. Or that 15 year old who is car crazy like I was back then.

It is one thing to show up at an event with a parent or uncle introducing you to the group and helping form those relationships--but it is even more difficult for those who don't have that.

I've been very welcomed by my local group--but I'm older than dirt (almost half a century). And I'm sure that my local group would be thrilled to death to see anyone show up in a Stude. But what are we doing to get that new stude owner to show up in the first place?

Jeff is doing a good job of spreading the word. And I think maybe Chris and Alex came to the club without family to assist?

JRoberts
08-15-2012, 09:43 PM
...Remembered another one, guy named Crockett who has one of the Chevybakers (a '65 F-body, I think) beautifully rodded...have never actually seen the car but coveted it instantly I saw a photo of it.



S.

Is this the young man who had the beautiful Black '65 or '66 at the Lancaster? It had a 383 small block if I recall. If this is him he was one of the last to receive a 21 and Under t-shirt. He was just 21 then I think.

Bob Andrews
08-15-2012, 09:54 PM
My nephew Evyn was completely enthralled when he was little. Really enjoyed SB in '07 at 11 years old. Sonny J gave us a Lark body that I hauled home from GA that I thought we would build together. Now he's 16 and has found girls and drums and lacrosse, and they don't mix well with Studebakers. Or old uncles.

I hope to bring him back someday to the car world, and Studes in particular. Time will tell. Hopefully that seed is still alive, just dormant.

Milaca
08-15-2012, 10:08 PM
I've brought my youngest nephew with (just turned 15) to a couple of shows each of the last 5 years in my 1963 Hawk. He's at the age now where he is becoming more independent but I hope to bring him with in the Daytona convertible to the Studebaker car show at Hugo MN on Labor Day. I dont know if he will ever want a Studebaker (we certainly can't force people to like them), but I have given him lots of exposure to them.

Chris_Dresbach
08-15-2012, 10:39 PM
And I think maybe Chris and Alex came to the club without family to assist?

You would be right in thinking that. I'm the "odd ball" of the family I guess. I think being a South Bend native had a lot to do with my gaining interest in Studebaker, however none of my relatives worked at Studebakers, were members of the drivers club, or really much of anything to do with the brand. I think I only had two relatives that owned them: a Lark and a '55 Champion. I don't even have a photo of the Lark, and one of the '55. Still though, my grandpa worked for Bendix (later Allied Signal and Honeywell) and drag raced a Ford Galaxy! As a matter of fact the most he did with Studebaker's was repair carburetors for extra money. My stepdads grandpa worked for Studebaker, but I never knew him and I was already into Studebakers well before my stepdad was in the picture.
I got my interest in the brand when I was 3 years old. I barely remember riding in my moms car going down Sample Street and seeing the abandoned factory buildings. I also barely remember seeing Newman & Altman in operation, but I remember I was devistated when I saw the building coming down. But it was really the factory buildings, most of which are now gone, that started this madness. I was fascinated with what used to go on in there and have always loved history. One day when I was about 8 years old I convinced my mom to drive down Franklin Street because I wanted to see the other side of those buildings, and I clearly remember seeing "SASCO" on the doors of the Engineering Building and didn't know what that meant, but I saw the Studebaker symbol on the doors. It was a Sunday and SASCO was closed, but I looked inside and was in awe of what I saw in the showroom. I didn't even know what those parts were or what they went on, but SASCO became a household name after that day and I hadn't even been inside! I thought how cool it would be to work there. (little did I know...) Now my mom is a dental assistant and like most people that work with the public she likes to talk with her patients. There were two patients that started my interest in Studebaker vehicles and the drivers club: Jim Maxey and Ray Neid. Jim lives just down the road from my grandparents and told my mom to bring me down to his barn and I could check out the Diesel. Then Ray Neid brought a stack of old Turning Wheels to my moms office to give to me. I read those TWs cover to cover about eight times over, that was 2005. After that three years passed (for whatever reason) and I joined the SDC and have loved every minute of it ever since.
The moral to this long rambling from the rear corner of my mind is that to attract more younger members we must have a large flatbed Diesel transtar with a payload of old Turning Wheels and give them out to kids at car shows. The factory and Jims truck is what got my interested in the vehicles, and the magazine is what got me in the club. To this day I'm still not really sure what sparked such a strong interest in the factory buildings for me and ultimately for everything Studebaker, but I sure do wish it would get other young folks like it did me.
I'd like to hear Alex's story.

Milaca
08-15-2012, 11:38 PM
I agree with Chris about those old Studebaker buildings, they were fascinating. The first time I visited Newman & Altman back in 1988 (when I was 17), it was an awe inspiring moment as it was like traveling back in time to another era. A dark grundgy oil-soaked wood floor brick building with lots of new old stock parts on the shelves. I think it was that visit that really hooked me on Studebaker. A Studebaker is just another car until you visit it's birthplace and can go into a building that played a part in the creation of it. The Studebaker museum is nice, but it's nothing compared to a Studebaker factory building visit. Perhaps the South Bend school system could give it's students a guided interprative tour of the body plant for history class? I think it would raise a lot of interest in the marque among young people.

RJMcGregor
08-15-2012, 11:52 PM
Well, I'm 44, but my boy is 5 and he loves our "stoo-da-baker", he has jumped right in and is a full partner in it's resto, Alex and I have checked out a few show and shine and he always says, "Daddy i don't see any Stoo-da-bakers", but the last one he liked a '29 Essex, so I think it's save to say a studebaker is in good hands with him :)

Lark Novice
08-16-2012, 12:05 AM
I am 46 and I still feel like the youngest kid at all the Studebaker events I go to. I embarrass my 13 year old when I pick her up from soccer practice in my flamingo Lark 4 dr. sedan in front of her friends! -- I am sure she will begin to appreciate old Studebakers in future years. Me, I just love it and I don't care whether my kids get it yet or not.

My 10 year old daughter still thinks it's sort of cool but she doesn't like it when it vapor locks or won't start right away--- she is spoiled by our 2009 Nissans!!

Chris_Dresbach
08-16-2012, 12:10 AM
Perhaps the South Bend school system could give it's students a guided interprative tour of the body plant for history class? I think it would raise a lot of interest in the marque among young people.

As much as I like your idea I don't think it will come true any time soon. The South Bend schools eliminated basically all field trips unless they deem it absolutely necessary as a form of budget cuts unfortunately. I remember going on a field trip to the SNM when I was in first grade. We went there for an unrelated exhibit... So naturally I snuck out of that group and looked at the cars. ;) That was back in the old Freeman-Spicer building museum.
Besides that, I think the Chippewa plant would be a better choice to lead a tour for kids through. For us "Studebaker diehards", a tour through the body building would be great, mostly because we already know what happened there and we would be there with the intention to see a Studebaker building. If you just want to learn about the INDUSTRIAL HISTORY of Studebaker the Chipeewa plant is the best choice because there is a little more to see.

laughinlark
08-16-2012, 12:16 AM
Just caught this thread. My daughter is 19 now. She is a drag racer. She got her licence at 16 in her 64 Cruiser. She also raced her Cruiser. She went to prom driving her graduation present (63 Lark). She now races her 63 Lark. Funny story, at 16 with a learner permit NHRA wouldn't allow her to race the Cruiser. The require more licensing than a permit. So she would tow her Jr. Dragster on the trailer to the track with the 63 Lark. We would unload the Jr and she would run it. She was NHRA licensed to do that.

Gordon S

JimC
08-16-2012, 12:40 AM
Well, I'm outside of the "Under 25" window by 6 years, but if you go by my maturity level, I'd be well within range!

Having said that, my almost 3 year old son is absolutely in love with all things Studebaker. We'll sit around at the computer for hours at times looking at Studebaker pictures online, and he can tell me what make most of them are by now. (PS - Odds are pretty good that if you have a Studebaker pic online, he's seen it!) My '60 Sedan is basically called his car, and when he's 16, it's his if he wants it.

We really got to impress a few of our local chapter members this last Saturday. The little man was awake before I left for our Saturday morning Stude breakfast, so I brought him along. Aside from my Lark there was a Champ, two Avanti's, another Lark, and a Commander, and he could name them all. He really wanted to see a hawk and a bulletnose, but we have another meeting soon, so he may get his chance yet.

I wouldn't add them to the tally, but in the campus I live/work on, there are just about 400 boys and girls from about 10-18 years old. Every one that I've talked to thinks my Lark is the coolest car ever. The car itself has almost become a campus legend, so many folks talk about it. Anymore, I'm referred to by people who don't know my name as "the guy with that cool red and black car."

It is amazing. People of all ages seem to love Studebakers. I'd imagine that if there were more "Studebaker Evangelists" out there, and if we funneled some of our resources into it, it would not be too hard to get more youth onboard. Studes are just plain cool. Great thread topic!!

RJMcGregor
08-16-2012, 08:38 AM
Jim I love that term "Studebaker Evangelists", I wonder what the over 60 crowd thinks of us "young Pups" and our love for these Cars??, my love started really early for pre mid 60's cars, as we had a family farm, full of classic cars for us kids to play in, but always had to be careful around grandmas 51 "bullet-nose", pretty much all the others (51 Merc,59 Imperial,59 Dodge Mayfair,52 Chev,58 Ford,57 Ford,56 Olds,63 Chev,60 ponitiac,61 Comet, etc etc), the 51 Studebaker, is still there (most of it, someone stole the nose cone and some trim off of it), but I'm thinking of bringing it home and tackling it next after the 58, its a beauty, White 4dr Champion and Grandma, would love to see some try and do something with it, anyway off to work and daydreaming 'bout cruzing back to my childhood, playing in those classic cars at the family homestead :), have a great day!

BShaw
08-16-2012, 09:40 AM
Attracting young folks to Studebakers (or at least not scaring them away) is something all of us enthusiasts can and need to work at. The "21 & Under" t-shirt program was (and still is IMHO) a good idea but it required the young person to own a Stude and register it at the show/event. That pretty much guaranteed that the participant pool would be very small. We probably should have had some less restrictive criteria for earning a free shirt. I remember at the Lancaster IM there were two or three early teens volunteering to park incoming cars. None of them owned a Stude. I gave each one a shirt certificate just for volunteering and they loved it. I bet Joe has handed out a few of those as well. We probably should have done more in that direction as well as raising the age limit to maybe 29 like the NSRA program had.

I too, like JimC's "Studebaker Evangelists" characterization. Some of you may be seeing my "Be A Champion" articles in your chapter newsletter where I write about little things we can do to be a good ambassador for Studebakers and our club. There's nothing in those articles that hasn't been discussed many times on the forum but it never hurts to keep spreading the word.

I think it would be fantastic if someone would do a write-up for each of the young folks listed in this excellent thread (and photo). In fact, wouldn't this be great (and fitting) to read about one of these young persons every month in Turning Wheels? Maybe even have a young person writing about other young Studebaker lovers? Hmmm...our resident young writer, Matthew Burnette has a monthly "Tailgating with Matthew" column. How 'bout it, Matt?

unclemiltie
08-16-2012, 10:12 AM
This thread is encouraging! In my area we do not seem to have as much interest from the next generation, I am in the over 60 set. As a side note, it is amazing how kids adjust to driving old cars. I set up a 1970 Hornet fastback for my two daughters whom are now in their early thrities. I changed the color from the factory yellow which they balked at to the one of their choice, a medium red. While they did not at first like driving it they soon changed theirs minds as much to my surprise they said it was a boy magnet as the boys had no clue what it was and would come and start up a conversation. Another side benefit was it was better made then the cars of the time (late 1990 -2000's) and survived several accidents much better than the other cars. And they still talk of the good times they had with that Hornet!

Jackson
08-16-2012, 10:44 AM
Getting a little help from my 5 year old twin grand daughters. They love cruising around in my 34 Dictator street rod, looking at all the photos in car magazines, and just sitting in my cars.


16926

rockinhawk
08-16-2012, 05:52 PM
OK, We've add another Girl to the mix, 15 boys 7 girls.

as far as the comment about family tradition, I agree that's where most of the young folks come from. My grand sons are 4th generation.

My father owned a 59 Wagon, then a 62 2dr sedan, He gave me a 48 Champion Conv. when I was 16. My daughter Rebecca(Matthew's Mom) drove a 63 Daytona to school,We still have most of that one. Josh's mom never owned a Studebaker but his Dad has had several.(Currently a 53 Studillac). Zack's Mom has a 59 Truck. Their Uncle James has a 51 and a 52 Champion.

As far as the TW articles, Look for Joshua Pair in an upcoming issue with a story about his Lark.

The rest of you young people... Send in your stories. I would love to read more about the Girl Drag Racer.

HUDSONBROTHER1
08-16-2012, 09:30 PM
Just caught this thread. My daughter is 19 now. She is a drag racer. She got her licence at 16 in her 64 Cruiser. She also raced her Cruiser. She went to prom driving her graduation present (63 Lark). She now races her 63 Lark. Funny story, at 16 with a learner permit NHRA wouldn't allow her to race the Cruiser. The require more licensing than a permit. So she would tow her Jr. Dragster on the trailer to the track with the 63 Lark. We would unload the Jr and she would run it. She was NHRA licensed to do that.

Gordon S
Cool. The more young people the better. I like the tow car part.

FlatheadGeo
08-16-2012, 10:19 PM
"I love that term "Studebaker Evangelists", I wonder what the over 60 crowd thinks of us "young Pups" and our love for these Cars??" Well, I am now 61 and first joined SDC when I was 16. Left to raise a family and have a 35 year teaching career. I love this thread and all of the comments and ideas. I am now awaiting for some former students to come and switch out my Champion engine for me. (They offered to do this.)

The secret, I believe, is in driving the cars and taking them to the young 'uns!!! I always took my car to school. When one of my former students heard two other college students, mine, talking about Studebakers on campus; he went up to them and corrected their mispronunciation of StudBaker. They were all amazed to learn that they all had me as a teacher at one point in their high school career.

The point, again, we have to get the cars to them and talk about the car, company and let them touch and feel the history!!! Our enthusiasm is contagious!!!!

GThawkwind
01-31-2013, 11:37 PM
I'm 18, but I'm not in the SDC, just on the forum for now. I'm currently in the process of trying purchase a vintage stude I've been lusting after since I was a little kid. Studebakers been my favorite car brand since the first time I saw a golden hawk in hemmings classic car, I love the depth of their history, and theirs something especially cool about an independent car company.

P.S. This is my first real post I just made this acount the other night cause I keep looking stuff up on this forum anyway.

studebaker-R2-4-me
01-31-2013, 11:45 PM
Well I still consider myself part of the younger crowd but I am 28.

All things considered, when I hang out at SDC events, no offense to anyone, but I still consider myself part of the younger crowd and I'm 52!

Pat Dilling
02-01-2013, 12:06 AM
GTHawkwind, Welcome to the forum and hopefully to the SDC. Taking a guess you admire GT Hawks, may I suggest that you take advantage of the experience and expertise here as you embark upon your purchase. Let folks here review prospective purchases and help you avoid any pitfalls. Good luck in your search.

JimC
02-01-2013, 12:12 AM
I'm 18, but I'm not in the SDC, just on the forum for now. I'm currently in the process of trying purchase a vintage stude I've been lusting after since I was a little kid. Studebakers been my favorite car brand since the first time I saw a golden hawk in hemmings classic car, I love the depth of their history, and theirs something especially cool about an independent car company.
Hey, welcome to the forums! It's a good crowd. There is the odd grumpy one every now and again, but by large the folks here are about as friendly and welcoming as you can expect.

Golden Hawks are really impressive cars. If you've got a specific one you're looking at, post some photos and ask around here. As weird as it is, the Studebaker world is small enough that someone on this forum has probably driven, or at least looked at, any given Studebaker you can find on the road.

The club is worth joining. I joined at 18 for a couple years, fell off the wagon, and rejoined in my late 20's. The magazine is great, and the networking with your local chapter helps you find all sorts of great stuff (most of the parts from my car came from another guy in our club. In fact, as close as you are to Omaha, he's probably the guy you'd want to chat with for parts once you get a Stude - PM me and I'll send you his details). Lurk around for a while. If you ever find yourself a couple hours south, let me know, and we can coordinate a couple Studes for you to ride in. I've got a Lark that's a lot of fun (don't knock the Lark - it made the cover of the March issue of Hemmings!), and we put on a great orphan show in the spring.

Again, welcome onboard!

Aussie Hawk
02-01-2013, 01:12 AM
Three of my sons and one of my daughters are into Studes.

RadCruiser
02-01-2013, 12:24 PM
How many of those, however, came into the club without having a family member bring them into the hobby?

Please do not take this as a negative criticism in any way--I'm thrilled to see these things pass along through family members. But I think we could probably do a better job of welcoming a young owner who happened to buy an old Stude because it was different. Or that 15 year old who is car crazy like I was back then.

It is one thing to show up at an event with a parent or uncle introducing you to the group and helping form those relationships--but it is even more difficult for those who don't have that.

I'm 25 now, but got my 64 cruiser at 23. I have never really heard of Studebaker before, although I went to a ton of car shows with my 06 eclipse that I have in my car club.
One of my dreams has always been getting an old muscle car and just biulding it up and working on it (something easier to work on then my 06, which requires you to be a master tech to do almost anything with).
I first saw the stude behind a Monroe Muffler sitting in the dirt with flat tires and weathered beat up paint. Did not think even to even look at it, looked like a brick and was not the muscle car I was looking for. But next time I went it was when they got the motor to turn over and slowly drove it into the bay. Even after 2 years of sitting it just wanted to run sooo bad but something held it back ( after I took the vcarb off I found the base plate was cracked by the vacuum tube and that was probably not letting it idle right) but I asked them if it was a customers car or if they would sell it. Seems the previous owner got it off ebay years back, and when the brakes went and they couldnt get parts they just let it sit and finally let the shop just take the car for a few hundred...

Idk why I bought the car, I still dont like the back end that much but I guess its because its a different car. Now when everyone asks what it is I can tell them its no chevy or a ford.
I do wish there was some chapter in my area though as I dont have too much stude guys to hang with, and with this being my first old car I can use help with some things (still cant figure out this dwell thing) but I just love the car now. Its been in quite a few adventures alrdy, especially when my gas guage wasnt working... at least then I thought I was getting decent gas mileage cause I couldnt see the needle drop.

Sorry about lots of blabbering, its definately a different car, and you dont necessary need to be born with the bug in order to be effected.

studegary
02-01-2013, 01:56 PM
RadCruiser - Your profile does not show where you are in NJ. No matter where, you are near to an SDC Chapter. New Jersey is a small state and there are chapters in the north and the south of the state and maybe others as well as in Staten Island, NY, Manhattan, NY and Pennsylvania that may be near to you.

Colin Meskell
02-01-2013, 06:10 PM
Well, I am answering for my son, but we just bought him his first car last year. He is 16 and when looking around for an inexpensive (under $1000) car to drive, we came across a 63 lark. (As well as many other beaters). He loved the looks of the car and wanted to know if we could get it up and running. I said, "no problem, these older cars are simple to work on compared to today's cars". We've now gone through much of the drivetrain, and are looking to fire up the previously frozen engine this weekend. I can't say that he is "into Studebakers", but he loves the car and as I said, picked it out of many we looked at. I come from a Ford family myself, and have grown up restoring them, but I am enjoying the history and craftmanship that I see in these cars.

Once we get this back on the road, it will be his daily driver, and maybe I can convince him to join the local SDC.

PS. His friends all like the looks of the car as well, although one of them commented that it looks like a toy car. Oh well.

GThawkwind
02-01-2013, 08:48 PM
Thanks for the welcome Jim, I'm honestly trying to figure out how the forum works right now. I've never tried using one of these things before and I was trying to find a way to introduce myself( I ended up posting a visitor message on my own profile which I don't think works real well) and spotted this thread. I still have no idea how to start a thread, etc, and could use some pointers. Call me paranoid(cause I am) but I don't wanna say to much and jinx myself. I'm not the first person to go after this little gem and don't want the rug to get pulled out from under me. I wouldn't suspect anyone up here, but its open to public view. Oh and I happen to think the lark is cool, a friendly looking little economy car with an optional HO V8 (no offense to six banger cars) whats not to love!

GThawkwind
02-01-2013, 08:53 PM
GTHawkwind, Welcome to the forum and hopefully to the SDC. Taking a guess you admire GT Hawks, may I suggest that you take advantage of the experience and expertise here as you embark upon your purchase. Let folks here review prospective purchases and help you avoid any pitfalls. Good luck in your searchThanks Pat, and yes I would call myself a GT hawk admirer, really any C K car's cool to me.

studoc
02-01-2013, 09:00 PM
My youngest daughter (12) has laid claim to my 2R5 pickup, and she seems to be warming up to my Hawk too. I will see this summer if she has real interest when it is time to attend some shows and cruise-ins. Probably wishful thinking on my part.
My older daughter (17) hit me once for picking her up from school with my pickup, but she eventually got used to it. She is like her mother though, and wants an ugly new car.
Several years ago, I told my Son (14) that he would inherit my 70 Galaxie hoping he would have some interest in classic cars, but thus far he shows no signs of my gearhead gene. I have given him ump-teen Hot Wheels, remote controlled cars and racing type video games throughout his childhood, but am failing miserably. I think my only hope is getting him to drive them when he is old enough.

rockinhawk
02-01-2013, 10:16 PM
GTHawkwind, Welcome to the club. We each have our favorite Studebakers. My personal pick is the finned Hawks. 'specially 57. Like the one below. i have owned this car for 34 years. My wife likes the 63 GT best.(upper left) we have had this one 21 years. Each one has it's own special qualitys,but if it is a Studebaker, it is special.

GThawkwind
02-02-2013, 12:10 AM
Thanks for the response, all the hawks (except the packard hawk) are some of my favorite cars. That silver hawk is absolutely geogous. I actually like the silver hawk fins better than the golden hawk fins, but I love a pillarless hawk so? and I have a special soft spot for the GT, you could probably tell by the name. with that many years of ownership you'd be the right person to ask, looks aside which of the two cars handles better and which is more fun to drive? does your wife's car have the four speed, and if so whats the mpg like? I'm most interested the two models you own so I'd love to talk. again I love your cars!!!

avantilover
02-02-2013, 02:36 AM
Three of my sons and one of my daughters are into Studes.

And I guess you bought all of them Matt LOL. Good to see more Studebakers on Aussie roads anyway.

avantilover
02-02-2013, 02:43 AM
Thanks for the welcome Jim, I'm honestly trying to figure out how the forum works right now. I've never tried using one of these things before and I was trying to find a way to introduce myself( I ended up posting a visitor message on my own profile which I don't think works real well) and spotted this thread. I still have no idea how to start a thread, etc, and could use some pointers. Call me paranoid(cause I am) but I don't wanna say to much and jinx myself. I'm not the first person to go after this little gem and don't want the rug to get pulled out from under me. I wouldn't suspect anyone up here, but its open to public view. Oh and I happen to think the lark is cool, a friendly looking little economy car with an optional HO V8 (no offense to six banger cars) whats not to love!

Posting a new thread (new topic) is easy, on the main General Studebaker-Specific Discussion forum page look at the top leaft of your screen and you'll see a blue button "Start New Thread" in the exact spot the Reply to Thread Blue button is on this page. Click on it and enter a topic name then type away, preview post if you wish then post it and it's done. Gee, if I can move threads about as a moderator you can easily do this. LOL.

Kurt
02-02-2013, 07:24 AM
My youngest daughter (12) has laid claim to my 2R5 pickup, and she seems to be warming up to my Hawk too. I will see this summer if she has real interest when it is time to attend some shows and cruise-ins. Probably wishful thinking on my part.
My older daughter (17) hit me once for picking her up from school with my pickup, but she eventually got used to it. She is like her mother though, and wants an ugly new car.
Several years ago, I told my Son (14) that he would inherit my 70 Galaxie hoping he would have some interest in classic cars, but thus far he shows no signs of my gearhead gene. I have given him ump-teen Hot Wheels, remote controlled cars and racing type video games throughout his childhood, but am failing miserably. I think my only hope is getting him to drive them when he is old enough.

Your family sounds like mine. One son two daughters......

Don't give up. My son, now 24, sounds just like your son. Absolutely no interest. I even gave him a 66 Commander to drive to school. BUT, the young lady who will be our daughter-in-law really thinks my old cars are cool.... My daughters don't seem to have any interest either. My daughters are embarrassed also when I show up at school in the Studes. The boys they seem to attract are a different story..... So that is where my hope lies.

JRoberts
02-02-2013, 07:33 AM
Your family sounds like mine. One son two daughters......

Don't give up. My son, now 24, sounds just like your son. Absolutely no interest. I even gave him a 66 Commander to drive to school. BUT, the young lady who will be our daughter-in-law really thinks my old cars are cool.... My daughters don't seem to have any interest either. My daughters are embarrassed also when I show up at school in the Studes. The boys they seem to attract are a different story..... So that is where my hope lies.

Wll, Kurt that proves one thing. In-laws are not so bad after all.

I guess I have been lucky. My son always liked to thinker with my Studebakers. Even as young kid he was better at it than I am. My three grand daughters all seem to like gramps's Studebakers. We'll see how that plays out. We all need to remember kids are people too. Some people like old cars some don't That's life.

GThawkwind
02-02-2013, 12:16 PM
Posting a new thread (new topic) is easy, on the main General Studebaker-Specific Discussion forum page look at the top leaft of your screen and you'll see a blue button "Start New Thread" in the exact spot the Reply to Thread Blue button is on this page. Click on it and enter a topic name then type away, preview post if you wish then post it and it's done. Gee, if I can move threads about as a moderator you can easily do this. LOL

Wow I'm dumb. that is really easy, I don't even have a facebook page. I swear programming,repair, actually working on this thing, I'm fine but when it comes to stuff like this I'm completely lost. My usual trial and error method doesn't work here cause I don't wanna start a bunch ramdom threads about nothing.

silverhawk
02-02-2013, 12:54 PM
Hey guys, been awhile! I haven't even lurked in a few months, I just needed a long break from the club; sadly I extended that to the forum as well. I'm the Dylan in the Northwest; now 19 and the Lark is down for a new engine right now. There is another Stude guy younger then me in my area, he daily drives a very nice '63 Cruiser he fixed up himself; I believe he's 19 now.

If the "under 21" program picked up again, and was running strong, I honestly think it would work well. In my area, my generation tends to love the cars; just is afraid of the maintenance; and some chapters in my area don't really make meetings or activities to let them feel welcome. I've live and breathe these cars (Along with Model T Fords); and I have even ran into that problem at times.

JimC
02-02-2013, 01:36 PM
Hey silverhawk, glad you came back! I had a few months where I was just too busy with other stuff to come here, so I'm just getting back into the mix myself. It's good to hav some old faces back!

As far as chapters not catering to the younger crowd, it can be a two way street. On the one hand, many of the older folks in the chapter have been there for decades, and literally paid their dues. So in that sense, I don't blame them for putting on meets or shows that cater to their desires. On the flip side, sometimes it takes us "younger folks" (and while I'm in my third decade, it's only just barely, so I feel like I have a *little* young left in me) being willing to respectfully step up to the plate and try stuff.

Here's what I've found in my chapter: While the vast majority are close to or deeply entrenched in the retirement zone, nobody has (at least as far as I've noticed!) objected to my being there. This fall I offered to set up a website for the chapter, to help reach out to the area. The chapter as a whole has been very supportive of this, to where they have given me photos of their cars to put online and are even going to put the website on their next regional car club directory. I can't speak for every chapter out there, but I think sometimes if the young people would take initiative and say "Hey! Can we try this?" they might be surprised at the positive reactions. Dive in, try to start something beneficial to both the club as a whole and younger enthusiasts. If the old guard doesn't have interest (which is their right, regardless of whether you or I feel it is right) then you should organize something separate yourself. To quote the venerable Larry the Cable Guy, "git er done!"

rockinhawk
02-02-2013, 08:54 PM
Thanks for the response, all the hawks (except the packard hawk) are some of my favorite cars. That silver hawk is absolutely geogous. I actually like the silver hawk fins better than the golden hawk fins, but I love a pillarless hawk so? and I have a special soft spot for the GT, you could probably tell by the name. with that many years of ownership you'd be the right person to ask, looks aside which of the two cars handles better and which is more fun to drive? does your wife's car have the four speed, and if so whats the mpg like? I'm most interested the two models you own so I'd love to talk. again I love your cars!!!
Thanks for the good words Hawkwind, Miss Edie's GT has a flight-o-matic on the column, Edlebrock 4bbl, disk brakes,power steering, twin traction, and aftermarket air.
My 57 has a V8 wcfb 4bbl with 3sp OD and not much else. So comparing the handling and drivability would be like comparing apples and oranges.
The GT feels heavier and smoother.It has a nice comfortable ride,and gets around 18 mpg. The Silverhawk is quicker,more nimble, has a more firm ride, and you feel more in touch with the car while driving it. It gets 21 mpg. We always try to use premium ethanol free gas if possible.

GThawkwind
02-02-2013, 11:50 PM
Thanks for the good words Hawkwind, Miss Edie's GT has a flight-o-matic on the column, Edlebrock 4bbl, disk brakes,power steering, twin traction, and aftermarket air.
My 57 has a V8 wcfb 4bbl with 3sp OD and not much else. So comparing the handling and drivability would be like comparing apples and oranges.
The GT feels heavier and smoother.It has a nice comfortable ride,and gets around 18 mpg. The Silverhawk is quicker,more nimble, has a more firm ride, and you feel more in touch with the car while driving it. It gets 21 mpg. We always try to use premium ethanol free gas if possible.

21's not that bad considering it's age. You think I could do better with the BW T10 in a GT? Browsing the web I saw some claims of up to 25-29, but I figured it had to be embellished at least a bit, but you never know with a stude. I assume the power options on the 63 GT result in most of the handling differences between the two cars. By the thanks for the response, most people wouldn't answer that many questions.

rockinhawk
02-03-2013, 10:38 AM
MPG depends a lot on the drivers right foot. A manuel trans and fewer pullys would help the mpg but the rear end ratio makes a big difference. The GT always felt like it needed to shift one more time. The 57 is turning 1900 rpm at 60mph. The tach has never worked in the GT but it sounds like 2200-2400 rpm at 60. I have been considering going to a higher gear but just havn't done it yet.

Flashback
02-03-2013, 11:24 AM
The SDC needs to===== The Local Capters need to--------The events need to-------And on and on. In my opinion I need to make a difference with the young people. And each of us as individuals, need to work with the young people at a early age, to introduce them to cars as well as the many other, more things important in their future. I have seen and read about evidence of this from some. Here's one of my efforts.

http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn320/Flashback53/dissassemblyandTOinstallacc021.jpg

silverhawk
02-03-2013, 01:03 PM
Hey silverhawk, glad you came back! I had a few months where I was just too busy with other stuff to come here, so I'm just getting back into the mix myself. It's good to hav some old faces back!

As far as chapters not catering to the younger crowd, it can be a two way street. On the one hand, many of the older folks in the chapter have been there for decades, and literally paid their dues. So in that sense, I don't blame them for putting on meets or shows that cater to their desires. On the flip side, sometimes it takes us "younger folks" (and while I'm in my third decade, it's only just barely, so I feel like I have a *little* young left in me) being willing to respectfully step up to the plate and try stuff.

Here's what I've found in my chapter: While the vast majority are close to or deeply entrenched in the retirement zone, nobody has (at least as far as I've noticed!) objected to my being there. This fall I offered to set up a website for the chapter, to help reach out to the area. The chapter as a whole has been very supportive of this, to where they have given me photos of their cars to put online and are even going to put the website on their next regional car club directory. I can't speak for every chapter out there, but I think sometimes if the young people would take initiative and say "Hey! Can we try this?" they might be surprised at the positive reactions. Dive in, try to start something beneficial to both the club as a whole and younger enthusiasts. If the old guard doesn't have interest (which is their right, regardless of whether you or I feel it is right) then you should organize something separate yourself. To quote the venerable Larry the Cable Guy, "git er done!"

I agree with what you say completely. And I myself personally like the way things are ran now; but when one of my best friends is 74; I don't think my opinion counts. I've seen chapters have open arms to new young members, and some chapters be downright hostile to them. That's all I'm trying to say; is that actually happens. I don't know if it's older members not feeling comfortable with trying to connect with people of my generation because of a age gap or what; but it is a sentiment in certain clubs even beyond Studebaker chapters.

rtgreenwell
02-06-2013, 10:00 PM
I'm 19 years old and own a '61 Hawk. Got it from my uncle in 2011. Before then it was my grandfathers and before that it belonged to my great uncle who bought it back in 1961. I've been into studebakers ever since I was 8 or 9 handing my grandfather wrenches in his garage. It was the car I learned to drive on when I was 13.

Welcome
02-07-2013, 07:14 AM
I'm 19 years old and own a '61 Hawk. Got it from my uncle in 2011. Before then it was my grandfathers and before that it belonged to my great uncle who bought it back in 1961. I've been into studebakers ever since I was 8 or 9 handing my grandfather wrenches in his garage. It was the car I learned to drive on when I was 13.

WELCOME ...to the SDC Forum!!!

Sdude
02-09-2013, 08:45 PM
This young model was going on and on about how much she loved my truck. Maybe we just need to expose them to Studebakers every chance we get. I think young people are more interested when they see the cool cars with modern running gear. I know that irritates some of our purists. When we don't knock them for modifying their cars, they are more likely to get involved with us.

21221

deco_droid
03-20-2013, 12:39 PM
I am planning on going to a huge car show in the next couple of weeks to do my part to get the Studebaker name out there -- I'll try to post some photos afterwards...

JimC
03-20-2013, 01:13 PM
LLoyd,

That's awesome! At our last chapter meeting, we talked about doing something for the weekly coffee cruise that takes place every Saturday morning in the spring and summer here. I was the only "Stude Ambassador" there all last year. With any luck we can get a few of the other guys to show up, and maybe even put up our club's "We Invented Cool" banner, if we can ever find it! (Nobody in our chapter is sure that we ever got one, but they're looking into it.) Our May car show is coming up, too (shameless promotion (http://www.huskerchapter.com)) and that always gets a pretty good draw. Heck, it's the reason I was reminded to join the local chapter. Things like this do bring in fresh faces. I'm living proof of that.

There are a million opportunities out there to get the word out to young folks. I know the idea of having a hundred 8th graders swarming the cars can be scary, but I know a couple middle schools in our area that would probably jump at the chance to have a club put on a car show in their parking lot for the kids. Advertising agencies know that the secret to a lifelong user of a product is to get them interested at an early age. The same goes for our cars.

deco_droid
03-20-2013, 01:24 PM
Yes Jim, this is a Cars n Coffee meet they do once a month. I have gone the past year or so and have yet to see one Studebaker. There are probably 300 to 500 cars that show up each month, mostly classics and exotics.

63avanti.
03-20-2013, 07:31 PM
I know this is an older thread, but I am 23. I Purchased my first Studebaker this past weekend. It is a 1951 Studebaker commander. Plans are to do a full restoration back to factory.

I spent about 7 years growing up in South Bend Indiana. As a family we always made it a point to stop in at the Studebaker museum every few months and cruise through the town to see what was left of the old factorys.. This is where my passion started. My father was an active SDC member, and owned quite a few studes in his life from larks on up to a 63 Avanti. All though they were all sold before I was born i remember flipping through the photo albums seeing every one of them. My father has since passed and it has been my goal to continue his Studebaker legacy in the Wheeler family. I now am able to start this journey and the commander build will be in his memory. I also hope to one day purchase a 1963 Turqouise r2 Avanti to add to my collection.

JimC
03-21-2013, 08:53 AM
Doug,

WOW! What a story. And talk about hitting it out of the ballpark on your first Stude. A bulletnose of any variety is extremely high on my want list. Keep us well informed on your progress! :)

rockinhawk
03-21-2013, 09:19 AM
I know this is an older thread, but I am 23. I Purchased my first Studebaker this past weekend. It is a 1951 Studebaker commander. Plans are to do a full restoration back to factory.

I spent about 7 years growing up in South Bend Indiana. As a family we always made it a point to stop in at the Studebaker museum every few months and cruise through the town to see what was left of the old factorys.. This is where my passion started. My father was an active SDC member, and owned quite a few studes in his life from larks on up to a 63 Avanti. All though they were all sold before I was born i remember flipping through the photo albums seeing every one of them. My father has since passed and it has been my goal to continue his Studebaker legacy in the Wheeler family. I now am able to start this journey and the commander build will be in his memory. I also hope to one day purchase a 1963 Turqouise r2 Avanti to add to my collection.
I remember being 23! I was living in Jacksonville Fla. Had a beautiful young wife, 2 kids with another on the way. I was driveing a 10 year old Lark and a 5 year old IH pick-up.
I don't have that Lark anymore but do have one very similar.
Do still have the same wife though. She has a 63 GT and a 81 Avanti. Those 3 kids plus 1 more are around here someplace. They all have A Studebaker of some kind or another.

I gave my son a 51 Starlight when he was 14. He just turned 41 and still drives it.

Mrs K Corbin
03-26-2013, 09:00 AM
What I think would bring people to this world is that when a
Studebaker changes hands, the deal is that the New Buyer/Reciever gets a
One Year Subscription in the Deal...
That way the continuity is there.

studegary
03-26-2013, 03:08 PM
What I think would bring people to this world is that when a
Studebaker changes hands, the deal is that the New Buyer/Reciever gets a
One Year Subscription in the Deal...
That way the continuity is there.

I agree. I have done this (purchased a membership) when selling a Studebaker to a person that is not a member of SDC.

Bellingham Studenut
03-28-2013, 02:13 AM
It's important to get good exposure by letting others of all ages enjoy Studebakers in any way possible.

We had a film shoot with young actors Friday night.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/20130319_2001582_zps58e00f36.jpg

Then a club of 40 mixed brand car visit Saturday, with owners enjoying a tour of Studebaker's.
Club members educated them on everything from history-to-horsepower.

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/100_6729_zpsdc04dab1.jpg

Showing young school groups a fun time, even seeing something they can enjoy, or recognize (such as showing them a movie), can catch their attention.
Help them experience something you would enjoy at their age, so they can enjoy and appreciate more at your age!

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/Muppets_zps01018052.jpg

If it's really cool, people want more, just like you.
It can be really Cool!

http://i356.photobucket.com/albums/oo6/Studenut_photos/100_5604_zps88289ef8.jpg


http://www.photoshow.com/watch/CB8Fr9Bm


James

R3studee
03-29-2013, 11:31 PM
All things considered, when I hang out at SDC events, no offense to anyone, but I still consider myself part of the younger crowd and I'm 52!

BIG AL........

You dont look a day over 40 in my book!

Scott
04-12-2013, 11:10 PM
I don't know if this young man is in the club, but he should be. Here's his '41 and story. It's worth a look: http://54.243.191.115/an-unlikely-pair?rel=232729682

LeoH
04-13-2013, 01:09 AM
Hey, don't forget this motivated young owner. He's just over the hill from me. It sounds like we might hear more from him this year.
http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/member.php?6829-carothersbs

studerodder
04-13-2013, 08:28 AM
my wife and i talk about this often. i am 56 years old and a hotrodder. i travel in two different car worlds, traditional hot rodding (64 and earlier cars with period correct mods) and studebakers. when i'm with the trad guys i'm the old fart. when i'm with the studebaker crowd i'm a young dude. perspective is a bitch.

GreaseGirl
07-07-2013, 03:23 PM
Hey All -

Welcome, and I'm glad to hear, about some of these other young members and Studebaker drivers! Although I'm a little out of the age range being in my 30s, I bought my '55 when I was 27, the first car I ever purchased...and it's been an adventure ever since!
Although I've been a member of SDC for a number of years, I just made it to my first club meet back in November (Orange County/LA/Inland Empire). Everyone at the show was more than welcoming (even though I have a SBC powering mine...which is soon to change) and I enjoyed myself thoroughly - if it weren't for my own car club and other commitments, I would show up more often and become more involved. More of my time is spent around the hot rod/rockabilly scene, where Studebakers are rare sights. I enjoy sharing mine, and she's been recognized by strangers all over LA!

LarkChamp
07-07-2013, 05:05 PM
Well, I'm no 21 year old, but being 26, I'm not far past it. I became interested in Studebakers when I was younger because my Dad had a Champ, and subsequently got a Hawk too. Ever since I was little I have been hooked on Studebakers.

My favourites are Larks (particularly 59-61, 61 single headlights preferably), Champs, and well, GT Hawks (Although '61s have been growing on me lately).

Me and my dad went and picked up my first Studebaker in 2010, a '60 Lark VIII four door.

57pack
07-07-2013, 05:39 PM
My Granddaugter is 6, she loves to hang out in my garage with me
when I'm working on my Wagonaire.
She's the only first grader in her class who knows what a Studebaker and Packard are and can pronounce Studebaker and Packard correctly.
Who knows, perhaps she'll wind up with one of my cars? Another future SDC member?

BobPalma
07-07-2013, 05:55 PM
It was good to see what I perceived as an unusually-high percentage of younger people at Colorado Springs. (I didn't say younger than what; I realize all things are relative!)

Seriously, one new fellow who deserves a tip of the old Stetson is Scott Campbell of Denver. Scott is shown here on Colorado Springs' Show Field with his newly-acquired 1962 7E13. It has a working hydraulic dump bed! This sturdy work(ed) horse had been sold new to The Colorado Highway Dept and went through several subsequent owners who did their darndest to kill it.

But Scott wasn't to be denied the opportunity to have a big, working Studebaker truck, so we laud him for recently getting it back in the air for all to enjoy, and bringing it to Colorado Springs: :!:

http://i571.photobucket.com/albums/ss155/BobPalma/DSCF5006_zpsffe4257f.jpg (http://s571.photobucket.com/user/BobPalma/media/DSCF5006_zpsffe4257f.jpg.html)

It defines patina! :cool: BP

showbizkid
07-07-2013, 06:39 PM
That's a cool truck :)

Corvanti
07-07-2013, 06:55 PM
i really get a "kick" out of helping, in the small amount i can, and reading threads of our new/or young forum members. their excitement is contagious!!!:)

for us "older" farts, please cut them some slack as they sometimes ask questions in rapid-fire. they just want to know as Mr. Vines would say: "yes, no, maybe"...;)

bosshoss61
07-07-2013, 07:03 PM
How about a free edition of TW to all first time posters on this website. :!:

Corvanti
07-07-2013, 07:31 PM
How about a free edition of TW to all first time posters on this website. :!:

i'd rather see them join the SDC, then get a month or more of free editions of TW (and maybe some back issues laying around)...:)

'66Commander
07-07-2013, 08:33 PM
Im spreading the old car word, mostly Studebaker, with my friends.
This is one youngin that has a deep love of old cars.

LeoH
07-07-2013, 10:03 PM
Well, I'm no 21 year old, but being 26, I'm not far past it. I became interested in Studebakers when I was younger because my Dad had a Champ, and subsequently got a Hawk too. Ever since I was little I have been hooked on Studebakers.

My favourites are Larks (particularly 59-61, 61 single headlights preferably), Champs, and well, GT Hawks (Although '61s have been growing on me lately).

Me and my dad went and picked up my first Studebaker in 2010, a '60 Lark VIII four door.

Hey! A design perspective I completely can relate to! Thanks for sharing and happy Studebakering!

LeoH
07-07-2013, 10:08 PM
Hey All -

Welcome, and I'm glad to hear, about some of these other young members and Studebaker drivers! Although I'm a little out of the age range being in my 30s, I bought my '55 when I was 27, the first car I ever purchased...and it's been an adventure ever since!
Although I've been a member of SDC for a number of years, I just made it to my first club meet back in November (Orange County/LA/Inland Empire). Everyone at the show was more than welcoming (even though I have a SBC powering mine...which is soon to change) and I enjoyed myself thoroughly - if it weren't for my own car club and other commitments, I would show up more often and become more involved. More of my time is spent around the hot rod/rockabilly scene, where Studebakers are rare sights. I enjoy sharing mine, and she's been recognized by strangers all over LA!

Ok, that's a story there, how a 27 year old, of either gender thank you, decides on a '55 Studebaker for their first vehicle purchase and keeps it for several years.
Share it with the class, please!:cheers:

Corley
07-07-2013, 10:36 PM
I think that one way to draw kids into mechanics in general and Studebakers specifically might be to give them a set of tools. I know tools are expensive, but some basic tools, awarded to a clubs youth who have shown an interest, would go a long way toward drawing them in tighter. Also, spending time with them using those tools would let them see that they too can master the mechanics of a car, and if it happened to be on a Studie, all the better. I know that having my own 'real' tools sure got me motivated to do car stuff. 'T' shirts are great, but wouldn't the $10 for a shirt be better spent on a real useful tool that they could have for life? I've still got (and use) tools from my early learning years.

JMHO

4961Studebaker
07-08-2013, 12:10 AM
Hey All -

Welcome, and I'm glad to hear, about some of these other young members and Studebaker drivers! Although I'm a little out of the age range being in my 30s, I bought my '55 when I was 27, the first car I ever purchased...and it's been an adventure ever since!
Although I've been a member of SDC for a number of years, I just made it to my first club meet back in November (Orange County/LA/Inland Empire). Everyone at the show was more than welcoming (even though I have a SBC powering mine...which is soon to change) and I enjoyed myself thoroughly - if it weren't for my own car club and other commitments, I would show up more often and become more involved. More of my time is spent around the hot rod/rockabilly scene, where Studebakers are rare sights. I enjoy sharing mine, and she's been recognized by strangers all over LA!


Ive followed your Twitter posts/Blog. What year Cadillac engine is that?

JimC
07-08-2013, 02:51 AM
Hey All -

Welcome, and I'm glad to hear, about some of these other young members and Studebaker drivers! Although I'm a little out of the age range being in my 30s, I bought my '55 when I was 27, the first car I ever purchased...and it's been an adventure ever since!
Although I've been a member of SDC for a number of years, I just made it to my first club meet back in November (Orange County/LA/Inland Empire). Everyone at the show was more than welcoming (even though I have a SBC powering mine...which is soon to change) and I enjoyed myself thoroughly - if it weren't for my own car club and other commitments, I would show up more often and become more involved. More of my time is spent around the hot rod/rockabilly scene, where Studebakers are rare sights. I enjoy sharing mine, and she's been recognized by strangers all over LA!
Hey, for the last couple years of their auto-building existence, Studebaker thought SBC's were good enough :)

Regarding the underlined portion, it's a pity that by large, this crowd has yet to embrace Studebaker. To me, I think Studes would be a perfect fit. Of course, the downside is that there aren't a lot of Studes around. I mean, at their peak years, I wouldn't be surprised if GM was able to make as many cars in a year as all the cars that ever rolled out of South Bend. You can't walk into an auto parts store and find a valve cover for your Stude just lying on the shelf in an aisle, either. But again, I would think all of that would feed right into the desires of these groups. It's a little different, it taps right into the heart of American history. But that's just me. :)

JimC
07-08-2013, 02:58 AM
I think that one way to draw kids into mechanics in general and Studebakers specifically might be to give them a set of tools. I know tools are expensive, but some basic tools, awarded to a clubs youth who have shown an interest, would go a long way toward drawing them in tighter. Also, spending time with them using those tools would let them see that they too can master the mechanics of a car, and if it happened to be on a Studie, all the better. I know that having my own 'real' tools sure got me motivated to do car stuff. 'T' shirts are great, but wouldn't the $10 for a shirt be better spent on a real useful tool that they could have for life? I've still got (and use) tools from my early learning years.

JMHO
This reminded me of something I heard at a local Studebaker gathering. One of the guys was talking about a guy who had a toolbox that was specifically for the kids of the neighborhood to come and use. To me, something like that is powerful, and can help kids get to the right start. Like you, when I inherited my grandpa's tools, I felt more interested in car stuff, especially Studebakers, which were his car of choice. And then just a few months ago, nearly all my tools were stolen, and some local club members worked it out to replace the vast majority of them, along with a few hand tools I didn't have yet. That really confirmed that being in a group like this is a good thing.

I bought a bunch of play tools for my three year old to play with, and he loves them. I look forward to being able to give him his own real set in a few more years.

jimmijim8
07-08-2013, 11:39 AM
How bout giving away you already done read issues of Turning Wheels to folks that frequent multi make car shows as you campaign your Studebaker. People are attracted to your car as it is unordinary and just might buy one if they knew of the Support group known as SDC cheers jimmijim
i'd rather see them join the SDC, then get a month or more of free editions of TW (and maybe some back issues laying around)...:)

JimC
07-08-2013, 04:08 PM
Going to car shows in general would help. It leaves me a bit sad that so far in the year and several months I've had a drivable Stude, I have never seen a Studebaker of any model at any local cruise or show I've gone to, excepting our club's show. I've seen plenty of other orphans - Packards, Hudsons, Nash, A Kaiser or two, and a bunch of others. Yet Studebakers, which were built in greater quantities than any of those other makes, aren't around. I know people have their reasons, and maybe it's just dumb luck and Studes are out there, just at the shows I can't make it to. (I avoid a lot of the judged shows, as there's no way my car would stand a chance! ;) ) At the same time, I think if the cars were being put out there, on roads and at shows, people would be drawn towards them. They're cool cars, after all :)

BruceT
07-08-2013, 04:50 PM
51....and yes I am still a kid...that's what the wife thinks...my son is 18,daughter 12,they both putter on my truck now and again,and can spot a Stude from miles away...no shortage of young Studebaker fans at my house

LeoH
07-08-2013, 05:20 PM
Going to car shows in general would help. It leaves me a bit sad that so far in the year and several months I've had a drivable Stude, I have never seen a Studebaker of any model at any local cruise or show I've gone to, excepting our club's show. I've seen plenty of other orphans - Packards, Hudsons, Nash, A Kaiser or two, and a bunch of others. Yet Studebakers, which were built in greater quantities than any of those other makes, aren't around. I know people have their reasons, and maybe it's just dumb luck and Studes are out there, just at the shows I can't make it to. (I avoid a lot of the judged shows, as there's no way my car would stand a chance! ;) ) At the same time, I think if the cars were being put out there, on roads and at shows, people would be drawn towards them. They're cool cars, after all :)

I agree with this. It's a touchy thing, asking to see cars from other members in the club. I'm sure some members are just Stude fans, and some members are Studes in a state of disassembly, but out of 30 some members locally, I rarely see more than 6. I try to bear in mind that I don't go to every show, but they don't even regularly appear at the monthly meeting with their car. I certainly don't show up at the $35 to $50 events, and I don't appear at every cruise, but if I have a car like this, I want to display it and I want people to know something like this is out there. I guess that's it, isn't it? I can only do what I can do.

I guess it's good to know that we have 30 some people interested in Studebakers and a club, at least? It's part of that uncertain formula that creates a social group and doesn't always coalesce. I know of at least 3 Studes locally that people have but take them out sporadically to show, for whatever reason and don't even try to join the club.

dusty taylor
07-08-2013, 05:37 PM
We have been in the club since 1976. Our son Brian,is a member, as was my Dad, my Father-in-law, and now our Grand daughter, Madison.
Madison attended the International Meet in Colorado Springs with us, and she has been to the one in Springfield, Cedar Rapids, and South Bend, and she is 14.
As we were walking through the cars on the day of judging, there was 2 couples talking, and Madison was waiting for them to move to take a picture of a car. They continued to stand there, we eventually moved on, because they had no intention of moving. They were talking, and said 'young people have no business in this club, they said teenagers wouldn't know a Studebaker if they saw one. Well, I would imagine that Madison could tell them a thing or two about a Studebaker.
Do these 'people' think that they are not going to leave this earth, and will always be here driving their Studebakers? Come on, give me a break. If the 'teenagers' aren't encouraged to be interested and join, this Club will end. Nobody lives forever. She takes amazing pictures of the cars, shots most people don't get. She will get on the ground to get a good photo and wait patiently, ok sometimes, not patiently, but she is never rude. I wish I would have said something to this woman, and ask her how she thought this Club will continue.
And I believe that people in this club do not want kids/teenagers to attend. I know you can't please everyone, but how can a teenager be involved if the International Meet is during a school year? I know there are pros and cons, it's hot, vacation, etc. But, you can't expect this to continue without showing a little support.
By the way, she took this picture, and I believe it is most interesting, you would have to agree.
Madison has a 1962 2 door hardtop Lark 289 V8 automatic.
Wanda Taylor

JimC
07-09-2013, 01:40 AM
As we were walking through the cars on the day of judging, there was 2 couples talking, and Madison was waiting for them to move to take a picture of a car. They continued to stand there, we eventually moved on, because they had no intention of moving. They were talking, and said 'young people have no business in this club, they said teenagers wouldn't know a Studebaker if they saw one. Well, I would imagine that Madison could tell them a thing or two about a Studebaker.
Some of my thoughts on this are here - http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?72968-Studebaker-Evangelism

It's a pity that people don't see the critical role of youth in the club!

Swifster
07-09-2013, 10:09 AM
I like the idea of a tool box for the kids.

I do agree that first timers should be allowed to join the club for free, including Turning Wheels. Yes, this would be expensive. But I think retention would be high.

Corley
07-09-2013, 11:02 AM
A free first time membership for anyone under about 30 would be a great idea, because it would start putting Turning wheels in their home/hands. Those great articles create interest in the hobby, in the cars, in mechanics, and in Studies in general. Follow that up with a free years membership in the local club, and you will really draw them in. Young folks are typicaly on a very tight budget, so "FREE" is welcomed by them. Face it, us older guys can afford this much better than they can.

I'd even say that there would be some of the older guys that would donate a membership fee to be given to a younger person, to keep it from coming out of the clubs budget. I for one would do this in a heart beat if I thought a program was in place for it, and a deserving young person would benefit. This could be administrated in a number of ways, but should be handled at the national level, I think, to prevent lazy (excuse the term) local club members from not even applying. Make it really easy and it can happen!

Here is how I'd do it: Post a link on the web site to an application, that a young person could fill in. (It's all gotta be online, that's where the young'uns are, no snail mail allowed!) Once his/her request has been made, a forum notice is posted (along with access to the application data, so you know who is making the request) that a donor is needed, and one of us could step forward and offer to support that membership with one year's dues (Turning wheels included.) The donor send in a check or gives up the CC info, and it's done. BUT, someone would have to administrate this... (Sure, sounds simple, but I'm imagine that the privacy guru's would step in and spoil something or other...) Anyway, at that point, the local club where the recipient lives would be notified that there is a potential new local club member that just joined the national, wherein they could step up and draw the person in with a further offer of tools/help/advice, whatever their local agenda permitted.

Just my brilliant (spur of the moment) idea...

showbizkid
07-09-2013, 11:28 AM
As we were walking through the cars on the day of judging, there was 2 couples talking, and Madison was waiting for them to move to take a picture of a car. They continued to stand there, we eventually moved on, because they had no intention of moving. They were talking, and said 'young people have no business in this club, they said teenagers wouldn't know a Studebaker if they saw one. Well, I would imagine that Madison could tell them a thing or two about a Studebaker.


That makes my blood boil too, and you know what? Don't be shy about confronting people like that. I think that they are few and far between, but there are some of them, and we likely all know one (not necessarily inside the hobby): the crotchety old people who can't seem to take pleasure in anything except what they've accumulated for themselves, and who think that everyone else - especially if they're a kid - is inferior. Those people need to be confronted.

I'd rather have one kid like your daughter in this club than a hundred grouches with "perfect" cars. And I'll gladly tell them so to their faces.

deco_droid
07-10-2013, 05:11 PM
We have a 5 year old who absolutely loves riding in our "Stu-dee". We took it to Walmart a week or so ago and while waiting for my wife to "run in real quick" for an item, she and I hung out under a shade tree in the parking lot a couple of spaces down from the car. We were out there for maybe 10 minutes and I lost count how many people drove by slowly circling the car and/or stopping to take a cameraphone pic. I had to explain to my daughter why everyone liked the Stude so much. It was funny because she doesn't understand yet how or why the Stude is unique. I almost imagine in her head she must think EVERYONE has a Stude at home. ;)

brian6373
07-10-2013, 06:42 PM
Some people just hate the world, everything and everyone in it. I've only been in the Studeworld for five years, but with the exception of one, all my fellow Studites have been the nicest people you would ever want to meet. When I have my car out-and-about, one of the myths I always try to dispel is that parts are hard to come by and expensive. On many occasions I've invited people to sit in my car and extoll the virtues of a flat floor and plenty of headroom. (Like an old Lark salesman.) I tell the youngsters to go on youtube and look up Studebaker Pure Stock Races.

beatnik64
07-10-2013, 07:42 PM
Brian6373 has the right attitude, we should all treat our approach to new/prospective member with a "salesman" attitude. Remember that a positive, optimistic, and open conversation with people about Studebaker will create an encouraging environment that people will want to be around. WE!all have to keep our eyes and minds open to "selling" these cars and memberships to an uninformed public, don't be pushy rather focus the person you are talking to, a solid volley type conversation can produce the right results and may even gain you a life long friend in the hobby.
I'm 31 and have been into Studebaker all my life, buying my first Studebaker one at 21, I have considered myself an ambassador of the SDC since I was a child living in South Bend. My results with the approach I stated above has worked great and I'm always keeping my eyes peeled for new members regardless of age.

Bob Andrews
07-12-2013, 05:30 PM
On this subject:

http://blog.hemmings.com/index.php/2013/07/11/is-car-culture-dying-no/?refer=news

Pretty much what I've always thought.

GreaseGirl
07-16-2013, 05:36 PM
I think that @Corley's idea is fantastic - both for the tools and the membership donation. Even setting it up so that the young member had a person in the club that could be their "big brother/big sister"...help get them oriented to club activities, and to Studebaker world in general (where to get parts...etc, etc...). I think that could be fun for both old and new member!

GreaseGirl
07-16-2013, 05:39 PM
Regarding the underlined portion, it's a pity that by large, this crowd has yet to embrace Studebaker. To me, I think Studes would be a perfect fit. Of course, the downside is that there aren't a lot of Studes around. I mean, at their peak years, I wouldn't be surprised if GM was able to make as many cars in a year as all the cars that ever rolled out of South Bend. You can't walk into an auto parts store and find a valve cover for your Stude just lying on the shelf in an aisle, either. But again, I would think all of that would feed right into the desires of these groups. It's a little different, it taps right into the heart of American history. But that's just me. :)

I would have to agree Jim! I actually think Studebakers are a "sweet spot" - lesser known enough to be unique, but common enough to not be impossible to get parts for (not to mention still affordable)!

Sam Ensley
09-11-2013, 04:30 PM
2742627425The answer to getting young people interested is to get them involved. My six-year-old grandson has been helping me clean and work on cars since he was three years old. His two-year-old sister wants to do everything he does, so she has started wanting to help clean cars. These pictures show them helping clean my truck at the Tri-state meet in Maggie Valley.

'66Commander
09-11-2013, 04:45 PM
I'm only 21 and I have fallen in love with the Studebakers. It is my dream to own a Bullet Nose and a 1935 Commander one day.
Everyone that I talk to I tell them about Studebaker. I'm doing what I can to get my generation at least aware of them.
I plan to run my Stude into the dirt, then bring 'er back again! Until I'm in the dirt anyway. Then I hope that my future kin will catch the Studebaker bug too.

JRoberts
09-11-2013, 04:52 PM
2742627425The answer to getting young people interested is to get them involved. My six-year-old grandson has been helping me clean and work on cars since he was three years old. His two-year-old sister wants to do everything he does, so she has started wanting to help clean cars. These pictures show them helping clean my truck at the Tri-state meet in Maggie Valley.

I saw how you had those kids working so hard at Tri-State. I almost felt sorry for them, but then I saw the smiles on their faces and knew they were having a great time.

Kunoman1
10-22-2013, 02:45 AM
Hey all! I guess I'm bumping an oldish thread. I'm 18 and a sophomore in university up in Canada and would love to meet you all and listen to everyone's stories. I'm going to need lots of help in the next bit after I pick up a '63 Lark sedan from a kind man who is donating it to a poor student with pretty limited skills and equipment. In Vancouver there is a pretty big import car scene and while I hang out with that scene, I've always really loved older cars since I was a kid. I'm just here to say that the spirit isn't dead, there are plenty of kids like me who love carbs, whitewalls and bench seats.

JRoberts
10-22-2013, 06:04 AM
Hey all! I guess I'm bumping an oldish thread. I'm 18 and a sophomore in university up in Canada and would love to meet you all and listen to everyone's stories. I'm going to need lots of help in the next bit after I pick up a '63 Lark sedan from a kind man who is donating it to a poor student with pretty limited skills and equipment. In Vancouver there is a pretty big import car scene and while I hang out with that scene, I've always really loved older cars since I was a kid. I'm just here to say that the spirit isn't dead, there are plenty of kids like me who love carbs, whitewalls and bench seats.

Welcome! Glad you have decided to join us here. Look forward to hearing more about your "new" car. I suggest that you join the SDC and your local SDC chapter if you have not already done so. Lots of help available through those avenues. Again welcome.

STUDEMAC
05-21-2014, 12:48 AM
Looking back through some old threads and decided to respond. Im 20 and I have a pretty decent 62 champ pickup. It has the 259 with automatic trans. I have loved Studebaker and south bends history for a long time and last year I finally got my own Studebaker. I am in college and engaged to a beautiful girl that puts up with my Studebaker obsession.

showbizkid
05-21-2014, 02:33 AM
Looking back through some old threads and decided to respond. Im 20 and I have a pretty decent 62 champ pickup. It has the 259 with automatic trans. I have loved Studebaker and south bends history for a long time and last year I finally got my own Studebaker. I am in college and engaged to a beautiful girl that puts up with my Studebaker obsession.

You are a lucky man indeed :)

BobPalma
05-21-2014, 06:21 AM
Looking back through some old threads and decided to respond. Im 20 and I have a pretty decent 62 champ pickup. It has the 259 with automatic trans. I have loved Studebaker and south bends history for a long time and last year I finally got my own Studebaker. I am in college and engaged to a beautiful girl that puts up with my Studebaker obsession.

:!: You are fortunate indeed, Corey. Congratulations on all accounts. :D BP

Commander Eddie
05-21-2014, 09:05 AM
With young folks like you, Corey, continuing to see Studebakers on the road in the future is assured. :!:

SweetSixtyn
05-21-2014, 10:54 AM
My daughter:

Arianna, 10 years old. Just bought her a 1960 Lark VIII Hardtop 259/Auto and a 1959 Lark VIII 2-door 259/Auto. We're going to build the hardtop and probably sell the '59 to support the '60 build. So far I've been told it will be two-tone and have air conditioning. Original is solid black with the red Regal interior. I have about five years to finish it before she gets her drivers license. Although, she already races motorcycles...since she was six!

I have to admit though, the one cool accessory that has to go away is the flat reclining seat it came with. I'm just not cool with that!!!!! :eek:

Commander Eddie
05-21-2014, 11:18 AM
I have to admit though, the one cool accessory that has to go away is the flat reclining seat it came with. I'm just not cool with that!!!!! :eek:

Understood. I'm a father of 2 daughters myself but they are now married and one has 5 kids of her own. I wish I could get one or both of them into the hobby. I'm working on the grandchildren now. At least 1 out of 5 has to be reasonable odds, wouldn't you think?

STUDEMAC
05-21-2014, 01:49 PM
Understood. I'm a father of 2 daughters myself but they are now married and one has 5 kids of her own. I wish I could get one or both of them into the hobby. I'm working on the grandchildren now. At least 1 out of 5 has to be reasonable odds, wouldn't you think?
Well I am the youngest of five and the only one that cares about Studebaker and anything old out of my family. There is hope for u..

Rob1950
05-21-2014, 02:36 PM
Robert, 22, 50 starlight coup

Commander Eddie
05-21-2014, 02:58 PM
Robert, 22, 50 starlight coup

Yahoo! We're on a roll. Keep 'em coming.
Welcome Robert. :!!:

rockinhawk
05-21-2014, 05:36 PM
My daughter:

Arianna, 10 years old. Just bought her a 1960 Lark VIII Hardtop 259/Auto and a 1959 Lark VIII 2-door 259/Auto. We're going to build the hardtop and probably sell the '59 to support the '60 build. So far I've been told it will be two-tone and have air conditioning. Original is solid black with the red Regal interior. I have about five years to finish it before she gets her drivers license. Although, she already races motorcycles...since she was six!

I have to admit though, the one cool accessory that has to go away is the flat reclining seat it came with. I'm just not cool with that!!!!! :eek:That 60 sounds just like Josh's car. He also got it when he was 10. He's 14 now and drives it all over the farm. He can hardly wait till he's 16 and can drive it to town.