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Stude Rookie
07-27-2012, 02:52 PM
I recently aquired an engine that the owner said was stuck tight. The numbers are JTS1359.
I am going to attempt to free this thing up and would appreciate any help or advice from anyone who has had success in doing this. Don't know if they mean anything but the cast in numbers on the passenger side are1554641. Is this engine worth messing with?
Thanks in advance and I will see those of you that are going, in SouthBend next week.
Stude Rookie

RadioRoy
07-27-2012, 03:44 PM
Yes it is worth messing with. It's a high performance 289. The others will chime in here with more specifics, but it's a desirable engine.

(S)
07-27-2012, 05:59 PM
The JTS means is came from a Lark or Hawk, there is a list of JTS cars and you can see what the engine came from. Someone will always want it if you don't. You may even find that the car survives and wants its engine back!:!:

These were originally high compression so be carefull running it if you get it that far. There are 9.5 pistons available.

BobPalma
07-27-2012, 06:12 PM
Marion: Definitely keep that engine!

It was originally shipped in 1963 Gran Turismo Hawk # 63V17239. Ermine White, Disc Brakes, Twin Traction, Heavy-Duty, column-shift Flightomatic. It was not a full-package Super Hawk.

If anyone owns that car, you can be sure they'd like to have its original engine....and if the car does not survive, the engine is certainly worth saving anyway. :!: BP

63 R2 Hawk
07-27-2012, 06:27 PM
JTS stands for "Jet Thrust Supercharged", designated R2 on the badging. If it has the original heads, they would be 9:1 compression ratio to allow for safe supercharger pressures. It is definately worth saving. If it has major internal damage, the accessories (pan, heads etc) are very sought after. You can check the head casting numbers here:
http://www.studebaker-info.org/text3/Headcasting.html
Now you need to find a car for it..... and a supercharger!

PackardV8
07-27-2012, 08:39 PM
Take it to South Bend and flog it to someone who is restoring a supercharged car.

Yes, as previously mentioned, the pistons, cam, oil pan have value.

Maybe, you might like to know the block itself is the same as any garden variety Stude V8. Nothing magic there.

jack vines

rockne10
07-27-2012, 09:03 PM
I am going to attempt to free this thing up and would appreciate any help or advice from anyone who has had success in doing this.

IT CAN BE DONE!
Don't know how long yours has been locked but, all things are possible. Personally, I would soak each cylinder with Marvel Mystery Oil for as long as I had the patience. Others have marveled at the effectiveness of a 50/50 mix of acetone and brake fluid.
Depending on the severity, after a few days/weeks/months of soaking, the gentlest method of freeing I've found is to remove the starter and use a very big screwdriver or pry-bar on the flywheel a tooth or two at a time.
Patiently revolve through at least two complete revolutions while maintaining lubrication (MMO) on the rings.
This thing could come to life without any repair.

Stude Rookie
07-28-2012, 09:20 AM
Thanks to each of you for your input without which I would most surely be lost. I have not had the opportunity to play around with this engine yet and I needed some guidance before starting. Won't know what to do with it until after I try (successfully or unsuccessfully) to free it up. Thanks rockne10 for the tips on freeing it up. I would like to try that before I dismantle the engine. Thank each and every one of you for your suggestions and advice.
Stude Rookie

irish
07-28-2012, 02:03 PM
IT CAN BE DONE!
Don't know how long yours has been locked but, all things are possible. Personally, I would soak each cylinder with Marvel Mystery Oil for as long as I had the patience. Others have marveled at the effectiveness of a 50/50 mix of acetone and brake fluid.
Depending on the severity, after a few days/weeks/months of soaking, the gentlest method of freeing I've found is to remove the starter and use a very big screwdriver or pry-bar on the flywheel a tooth or two at a time.
Patiently revolve through at least two complete revolutions while maintaining lubrication (MMO) on the rings.
This thing could come to life without any repair.

Don't mix acetone with brake fluid! You want a 50/50 mix of acetone and automatic transmission fluid. And yes it does work great, better than anything else I have tried.

Joe

Mike Van Veghten
07-28-2012, 10:55 PM
Rookie -

Just remenber the "reason" it's....stuck...!
A coupla three reasons -

1. The rings are rusted to the cylinder walls.
Freeing this, should indeed allow the crank to turn and maybe start. But remember...each of the rings and each cylinderwall will have bad spots in them and likely leak oil AND compression. Low power and blue smoke out the tail pipe will eventually result.

2. The wrist pins (one or more) are corroded into the pistons.
This is a serious problem, and you most probably won't get the crank to turn. If you do, isn't gonna be only one wrist pin/piston, and that piston will start to enlarge that wrist pin bore and start to make some ugly noises after some miles are added to the engine.

3. Valves are stuck in the heads.
This can produce all kinds of problems if forced to move. Bent valves, bent pushrods, broken rockers......

I know people try this many times with older engines...from what I've seen it's a 50/50 deal whether the engine ever starts.....and it's about an 90% deal that the running engine will run far from ideal.

I'd keep it, rebuild it properly and brag that you've got a real factory Stude hot rod engine that actually runs like it's supposed to...!

Mike

RadioRoy
07-28-2012, 11:14 PM
Number three is easier to investigate than the others. By taking off the valve covers you can check for loose pushrods, or something funky with the rockers. You can even go so far as to remove the rocker shaft to see if all the valves come up. They seem to like to stick in the open position more often than in the closed position.