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View Full Version : Whatever it takes to make a [Studebaker] deal



BobPalma
07-12-2012, 07:41 AM
There's an old expression in the car biz: "Whatever it takes to make a deal."

Apparently, James Thompson liked a certain 1950 Studebaker Champion Coupe more than his 1949 Ford Tudor, but Palma-Rhoads Motors liked the tires off the Studebaker more than did Mr. Thompson!

And since Mr. Thompson worked 23 miles away at Shapp Marathon (7th and Cherry, Terre Haute IN), he would be in a position to remove the Studebaker's tires and return them to the selling dealer.

(Hey, like the man said, "Whatever it takes to make a deal!"):

http://i571.photobucket.com/albums/ss155/BobPalma/50studedeal.jpg

BobGlasscock
07-12-2012, 07:47 AM
Back in the 60s and 70s era when steel radials were still somewhat unusual, I would always buy a new car with the understanding that I got credit toward my trade-in for it having brand new tires off the new car. I would keep my radials and give the new tires back to the dealer.

DEEPNHOCK
07-12-2012, 09:02 AM
I was hoping there would have been a live chicken, or pig, in the deal:lol::rolleyes:

BobPalma
07-12-2012, 09:31 AM
I was hoping there would have been a live chicken, or pig, in the deal:lol::rolleyes:

That can be arranged, Jeff...but it didn't involve a Studebaker because they wouldn't be a Studebaker dealer until eight months later:

http://i571.photobucket.com/albums/ss155/BobPalma/shortyhorsedeal1.jpg

I wonder where "Shorty" was kept in stock during the 25 days he was in inventory. It was November, after all. It certainly added a new meaning to the work stock from an automobile dealer's viewpoint (but not from a farmer's point of view, of course; he knew what stock was all along!):

http://i571.photobucket.com/albums/ss155/BobPalma/shortyhorsedeal2.jpg

'Prolly would have made your wife a helluva deal on him, Jeff! (Hmmm...if they had sold "Shorty" at a loss, would that have been a short sale or a shorty sale?) :cool:

....but would you have been able to come up with $50 worth of coal to heat Palma Motors in the winter of 1954-1955? It was quite a few uninsulated cubic feet. :ohmy: BP

candbstudebakers
07-12-2012, 10:10 AM
Back in the 60s and 70s era when steel radials were still somewhat unusual, I would always buy a new car with the understanding that I got credit toward my trade-in for it having brand new tires off the new car. I would keep my radials and give the new tires back to the dealer.

Ya try that today, the salesman or woman would say What!! I don't understand what you want, you don't even get to choose the color let alone the tires.

candbstudebakers
07-12-2012, 10:14 AM
Bp, seeing these type of things is a real treat and brings back good memories , and I would bet you have boxes of these?

Mrs K Corbin
07-12-2012, 12:14 PM
Talk about PUSH-PULL-OR-DRAG! LMAO

Andy R.
07-12-2012, 01:12 PM
WOW...these are priceless!
I love that that the salesman was sure to adhere to the notation at the bottom for SERIAL-MOTOR-KEY on Shorty's invoice.
I'm a bit surprised the "KEY" entry wasn't "Apple or Carrot".

BobPalma
07-12-2012, 01:30 PM
BP, seeing these type of things is a real treat and brings back good memories, and I would bet you have boxes of these?

Yep, Bob; I do...plus the scrapbook from which I post things from time to time.

Every car they ever sold in 4 years being in business, new and used, has a separate invoice. AFAIK, I have every one of the originals. (It's easy to keep track of them; the Red Invoice Numbers in the upper right corner, like #651 in the below item, are in sequence. If any numbers were missing, I'd know it. There aren't.)

They're a real hoot, but Shorty-the-Quarter-Horse has always been my favorite... especially when the 'horse-tradin' got them a bunker of coal to heat the shop that winter. :D

'Times you'll never see again...at least not formally on paper!

I still haven't figured out how they sold two Willys pickups to Absarokee, Montana! :woot: One had a drawbar and one had a tow bar, so maybe one pulled the other out there. (I hope the one that got the oil filter did the towing!)

http://i571.photobucket.com/albums/ss155/BobPalma/montanawillystrucks.jpg

;) BP

BobPalma
07-12-2012, 01:35 PM
WOW...these are priceless!
I love that that the salesman was sure to adhere to the notation at the bottom for SERIAL-MOTOR-KEY on Shorty's invoice.
I'm a bit surprised the "KEY" entry wasn't "Apple or Carrot".

Good One, Andy.

The salesman was my Dad: L.S.P. (Lumir S. Palma). As he is fond of saying about he and his Brother Milton's years in business, "We had a lot of fun until we ran out of money....like Packard." :cool:

My wife and I and our little grandson Will (Dad's Great-Grandson) are meeting Dad and Mom this evening (July 12, 2012) for supper. He's getting around slower with a walker now, at age 95, but is in fine shape mentally; very much "with it." :D BP

Guster
07-12-2012, 01:37 PM
Those are great, and I am sure there were many other 'unusual trades' back then. I do like the bartering for coal 'deal.'

I used to do financial consulting to dealerships, and I would always look at the used car inventory quit closely because it could be interesting reading. About 1995 I was at a dealer and he had a swimming pool listed in his used car inventory. I knew there would be an interesting story here. The store had an 'i'll take anything in trade promo, and a guy came with a complete above ground swimming pool to trade, so they made the deal. He wasn't sure what he was going to do with the pool but was determined to make an interesting promo out of it.

8E45E
07-12-2012, 01:51 PM
I still haven't figured out how they sold two Willys pickups to Absarokee, Montana! :woot: One had a drawbar and one had a tow bar, so maybe one pulled the other out there. (I hope the one that got the oil filter did the towing!)


That almost appears to be a 'dealer-to-dealer' sale. Perhaps The Stillwater Garage had an immediate sale for two of them, and the zone manager for the region informed him Palma Motors had two. What was the Refund Check for?

Craig

BobPalma
07-12-2012, 02:03 PM
That almost appears to be a 'dealer-to-dealer' sale. Perhaps The Stillwater Garage had an immediate sale for two of them, and the zone manager for the region informed him Palma Motors had two. What was the Refund Check for? Craig

I have no idea about the refund check, Craig.

But I'll bet $50 they didn't have one Willys truck in ordinary stock, much less two. They would only have those had someone ordered them. They were simply too small to stock more than maybe 4 or 5 new vehicles total, including Packards, Nashes, Ramblers, Willys, Jeeps, and, by that time, a little Metropolitan!

Believe me, they would not have had two Willys trucks in stock. I was there most of the time I wasn't in school or sleeping, being "almost 9" when that ticket was written!

That said, this deal is so unusual that I'll try to remember to ask Dad if he remembers any particulars when we have supper with them this evening, and repost with any follow-up info. :cool: BP

studegary
07-12-2012, 03:40 PM
I once dealt with an Avanti buyer from Virginia. He was on a trip looking at several Avantis. He claimed that he would pay the price without quibbling. After taking my Avanti to a garage and putting it on a lift to check out the bottom, he wanted to pull the spark plugs and do a compression check on the engine. I drew the line at that. After stating that my 1963 Avanti was the best one that he found, he started to get into price. He ended up leaving the wheels and tires that were on my Avanti and putting on some that he brought with him. Of course, this was after the price was reduced.

I wonder why a Studebaker dealer would rather have a 1949 Ford in stock than a 1950 Studebaker (even trade).

556063
07-12-2012, 08:52 PM
I can remember deals or proposals with Boats, Motorhomes, Farm Equipment, Motorcycles, and even a Moped 30 years ago. The horse deal is the best I've ever seen, Bob.

Usually, if someone came in with something too far out of the norm, we'd try to connect them with someone (preferably, one of our customers) who dealt in that kind of item for a buy bid. Kind of like the "Pawn Stars" calling in their "experts". I imagine with the recent downturn in the overall economy the past few years, there's never a dull day in the appraiser's office at some used car lots. Amazing, this thread made me think about how I remembered that the car business acts and feels like an episode of "Pawn Stars" the first time I watched that show.

556063
07-12-2012, 09:07 PM
Reference Invoice 651 above for the two Willys trucks, it looks to me like the guys from Montana showed up with a bank draft for 3656.58. The invoice only came to 3590.45. Palma Nash sent the guy(s) back to Montana with the two trucks and a check for $66.13 to make the deal square.

1954. Phone or telegraph were the only two long distance immediate communication. No faxes. No computers. The prices were spoken over the phone most likely. And estimated at times too!! Almost the way it was in 1985 when I started in the car business. OK, I worked for six months before we got our own fax. Made sending credit applications much easier. Yes, we had a soundproof room at the back of the office to close the door and whisper credit applications to the bank or Chrysler Credit in. Just 27 short years ago!

comatus
07-12-2012, 10:36 PM
...but would you have been able to come up with $50 worth of coal to heat Palma Motors in the winter of 1954-1955?

http://data.mediarecall-data.com/wgbh/stills/mid/3G03351_mid.jpg

Oh I'm sure I've related a tale or two of the retail coal business, over the years. Old MF (my grandfather) told his three sons, when they came home from WWII and wanted to branch out into appliances and building supply, "What are people gonna do -- put in a new furnace?" And then he'd laugh, a flinty New England chuckle. Heh. Heh. Heh. I have to admit, it is pretty funny.

Coal was rationed in both world wars, in short supply during the European Relief years, and sold to industry on a priority basis during Korea. Then there was the business of Truman and the miners' union. All through the 50's, and in some places much longer, a guy with some coal to trade had something of solid value. You might call it a "black market." Heh.

Somehow, fast-talking salesmen got in the habit of saying they couldn't cut their margin any further because they "had to buy coal, after all." We had the Autolite account; you couldn't see over our coal piles. My dad would just pounce on that. They usually backed out right away -- downtown had central steam heat, from the Edison plant. They were bluffing.

The Farquhar and Barber-Greene are gone, but I keep a few ton on hand, just in case things "go south" suddenly. You never know when you'll make a good trade on a Stude, or a quarter-horse.

BobPalma
07-13-2012, 08:04 AM
Follow-up to Post #13, as promised.

Craig, Dad has no recollection of the two-truck Montana deal.

He well-remembers and often references, as he did last evening when I asked about the trucks, this deal with the station wagon, what with all the attendant publicity. But nothing emerged about the two trucks to Montana (hey, it has been 58 years!). Sorry.

http://i571.photobucket.com/albums/ss155/BobPalma/phillipinesjeepwagon.jpg

(I've previously posted that newspaper clipping, but not since I got my new scanner and can edit / size / enhance for better reading, as is now possible). :D BP

8E45E
07-13-2012, 08:08 AM
He well-remembers and often references, as he did last evening when I asked about the trucks, this deal with the station wagon, what with all the attendant publicity. But nothing emerged about the two trucks to Montana (hey, it has been 49 years!). Sorry.

No worries, Bob.

Thanks for checking, though. :)

Craig

56H-Y6
07-13-2012, 08:37 AM
Hi

Hummm.....traded in a 1948 Trailer, an unknown year quarter horse 'Shorty' and a 'dog'........a '52 Packard 200 sedan! That would be most any Big Three dealer's assessment at the time! Palma Motors was the only place in town that would have gladly taken it in trade!

Steve

BobPalma
07-13-2012, 09:18 AM
Hi

Hummm.....traded in a 1948 Trailer, an unknown year quarter horse 'Shorty' and a 'dog'........a '52 Packard 200 sedan! That would be most any Big Three dealer's assessment at the time! Palma Motors was the only place in town that would have gladly taken it in trade! Steve

Aww c'mon, Steve; that's a little harsh. They were nice enough cars compared to their contemporaries, and thoroughly modern as to style for the time...i.e., compared to a 1951 Buick or Oldsmobile.

Sure, the L-head Eight was getting long in the tooth, but it still did the job.

Dad didn't have much trouble selling those as used cars, although I remember 1948-1950 models on the used car lot longer than 1951-1952s! The 48-50s had a distinct musty odor; every one of them. 'Spent a lot of time sitting in them on the used car lot, playing...there were sure plenty of them to play in, it seemed like! ;) BP

Bill Pressler
07-13-2012, 11:43 AM
Aww c'mon, Steve; that's a little harsh. They were nice enough cars compared to their contemporaries, and thoroughly modern as to style for the time...i.e., compared to a 1951 Buick or Oldsmobile.

Sure, the L-head Eight was getting long in the tooth, but it still did the job.

Dad didn't have much trouble selling those as used cars, although I remember 1948-1950 models on the used car lot longer than 1951-1952s! The 48-50s had a distinct musty odor; every one of them. 'Spent a lot of time sitting in them on the used car lot, playing...there were sure plenty of them to play in, it seemed like! ;) BP

Bob, this thread has been thoroughly entertaining! "Whatever it took" is sure correct!....

studegary
07-13-2012, 01:04 PM
Your overseas Jeep shipment reminds me of a story from the dealership that I was selling at. We (the dealership) donated an ambulance to an Eastern European nation. When they received it, they called up and were very annoyed. They claimed that we took the batteries out of it. It turned out that they had not turned the master disconnect switch back on. The switch was obvious. It was just below the driver's seat, like where the S/N plate is on a C cab pickup.

Blue 15G
07-13-2012, 02:28 PM
Bob, did your Dad and Uncle sell any Willys Aero cars? Just curious. I always liked those.

Dave Bonn
'54 Champion Starliner

BobPalma
07-13-2012, 03:00 PM
Bob, did your Dad and Uncle sell any Willys Aero cars? Just curious. I always liked those. Dave Bonn
'54 Champion Starliner

Sure, Dave; do you mean like these?

http://i571.photobucket.com/albums/ss155/BobPalma/54willysaeroad.jpg

'Looks like Mr. Henderson north on Illinois 1 up in Chrisman liked 'em, too...and a little 2-door with overdrive, to boot!

http://i571.photobucket.com/albums/ss155/BobPalma/54willysinvoice.jpg

Bill Pressler
07-14-2012, 09:22 AM
Bob, which make of new vehicle did your Dad and Uncle Milt sell the most of--Packard, Nash, Willys, or Studebaker--in any given model year? My guess is Nash.

BobPalma
07-14-2012, 10:25 AM
Bob, which make of new vehicle did your Dad and Uncle Milt sell the most of--Packard, Nash, Willys, or Studebaker--in any given model year? My guess is Nash.

That's correct, Bill; largely on the strength of Rambler sales.

But as I go through the records, they sold a suprising number of "regular" Nashes, too; Statesmans and Ambassadors.

The best factory air conditioning system in the industry at that time, thoroughly integrated and low-cost, was a real boon. Not all that many people bought "factory air" in a small Midwest farm town in the middle 1950s, but those who did appreciated the superior Nash system. :!: BP

Mr. Bill
07-14-2012, 11:00 AM
Mr. Palma: Don't forget the 1954 Pontiac "8" models that could be optioned with the fully integrated Harrison supplied through the dashboard factory air conditioning. This was the first year air conditioning was available in a Pontiac and was the basis for integrated air conditioning in GM cars in the future.

An acquaintance who is partial to Pontiacs is quite knowledgeable of the '54 Pontiac system and is quite sure GM introduced integrated up front air conditioning in Pontiacs to the market sometime around December of 1953, a few months before Nash made the announcement of their system in 1954. He also keeps a roster of '54 models known with factory air conditioning and there ain't many.

I find all factory a/c models from the 50's interesting, but to me, nothing is neater than the Frigidaire and other trunk mounted systems with the outside air scoops, plexiglass air tubes and overhead vents. Sorta like a science fair project.

I recall that your father's dealership sold one '56 President Classic with factory air. Did they sell many Nash and Packard cars so equipped?

Below is a link to an ad for the '54 Pontiac factory air system. If this is off-topic, please overlook my post but this is something rarely seen and I thought it might be of interest.

Mr. Bill
Hamlet, NC


http://images.google.com/imgres?q=1954+pontiac+air+conditioning&hl=en&biw=1366&bih=622&tbm=isch&tbnid=izw1b0Y9FzjuVM:&imgrefurl=http://www.earlytimeschapter.org/54aircondad.html&docid=j74IK9NtHvpLAM&imgurl=http://www.earlytimeschapter.org/w-54-fresh-cool-air-ad-2.jpg&w=1000&h=1228&ei=V5gBULHYApSq8ATW6pD3Bw&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=111&vpy=120&dur=3266&hovh=249&hovw=203&tx=142&ty=266&sig=116836439992087333632&page=1&tbnh=130&tbnw=104&start=0&ndsp=20&ved=1t:429,r:0,s:0,i:72

BobPalma
07-14-2012, 02:29 PM
Mr. Palma: Don't forget the 1954 Pontiac "8" models could be optioned with the fully-integrated, Harrison-supplied through-the-dashboard factory air conditioning. This was the first year air conditioning was available in a Pontiac and was the basis for integrated air conditioning in GM cars in the future.

I recall that your father's dealership sold one 1956 President Classic with factory air. Did they sell many Nash and Packard cars so equipped?

Below is a link to an ad for the '54 Pontiac factory air system. If this is off-topic, please overlook my post but this is something rarely seen and i thought it might be of interest. Mr. Bill

'No chance of forgetting it, Bill; I never knew it! That is very interesting; thanks for the link. Even more interesting is that The General "let" the dowdy at the time Pontiac line have it first.

Surprisingly, Dad sold more than a few Nashes and Ramblers with air conditioning. However, I believe the following are the only two non-Nash cars so equipped.

First, an ordered 1956 Packard Clipper Super Sedan. Note Mr. & Mrs. Williams having specified Push-Button Ultramatic. Push-Button transmission controls were available in Clippers after being exclusive to Packards early in the year, so one might suspect Packard and their dealers had adopted the philosophy of this thread's title by that time...after all, the Williams' traded in a Hemi, by golly!

http://i571.photobucket.com/albums/ss155/BobPalma/56clipperorder.jpg

The above Clipper's Serial Number has been registered with the Packard Club V8 Roster for several years, but has not surfaced, I'm sorry to say.

When Mr. & Mrs. Williams ordered this car, it was the more expensive of the two 1956 Clipper sedans still available. The more expensive Clipper Custom had been discontinued mid-year when the 1956 Packard Executive was introduced. (If their car had been a Custom, the only difference you'd see on the outside would be the script on the front fender and the Custom's stainless-steel rocker panel molding, with which Supers were not equipped.)

Mr. & Mrs. Williams must have liked the 1956 Clipper Super Sedan in the 1956 Packard full-line brochure, because they ordered the same colors in the same arrangement as this brochure car, Paint Code MP. (Interesting to note is that the brochure caption reads as though several items of optional equipment were standard equipment, which they were not! 'No lawyers to scour the ad copy yet, it would appear!)

Their Clipper was not identical to this brochure car, however. Can anyone figure out why?

http://i571.photobucket.com/albums/ss155/BobPalma/56clippersupersed.jpg

Finally, to go full circle and get back to Studebakers, here's the ticket for what I believe was the only Studebaker they ever sold with Factory Air Conditioning:

http://i571.photobucket.com/albums/ss155/BobPalma/56presclassicorder.jpg

:D BP

Mr. Bill
07-14-2012, 03:43 PM
Would it be the little "Packard" script mounted on the right of the deck lid?

Bill Sapp
Hamlet, NC

BobPalma
07-14-2012, 05:02 PM
Would it be the little "Packard" script mounted on the right of the deck lid? Bill Sapp

An excellent catch, Bill, and you're exactly right! The brochure was done early in the year and the Packard script wasn't added until January 1956. Therefore, their car would have had the script when delivered, since it was probably built in March or early April.

You get extra points 'cause I hadn't even thought of that...and you're right.

There is another difference I had in mind, though, that is more obvious.

Any idea, anyone, what it might be? It's an oddity, for sure. BP

Mr. Bill
07-14-2012, 05:12 PM
Was a radio of any kind standard on a Clipper Super? I don't see a mention of it on the P.O. and I would think Mr. and Mrs. Williams would have enjoyed a radio in their new car, especially since they paid a substantial amount of money for the pleasure of air conditioning. Then again, maybe not and by deleting the radio, they felt better about splurging for air conditioning.

The brochure model doesn't show a radio antenna that I can see, so is that it? My other answer would be a difference in the tint of the glass, especially on an a/c car like the Williams purchased.

Bill Sapp
Hamlet, NC

BobPalma
07-14-2012, 05:31 PM
Bill, you're right about the radio, too: Their car was ordered without a radio, which is downright odd given all the other options. But no antenna is shown on the brochure car, either, so theirs and the brochure car would look the same in that regard.

Tinted glass would be difficult to determine with any certainty on the brochire illustration, too, so that's not it.

Study the options they ordered and the brochure illustration a little more carefully, 'cause you'll get it in a minute and be really surprised! BP

avantilover
07-14-2012, 05:40 PM
Interesting that the Aero Willys was a "Lark" Nice to have the memorabilia.

8E45E
07-14-2012, 06:37 PM
Study the options they ordered and the brochure illustration a little more carefully, 'cause you'll get it in a minute and be really surprised!

If that brochure car had air conditioning, it would have the clear plastic tubes in the corners of the rear package shelf, and would be clearly visible.
Craig

Bob Langer
07-14-2012, 06:44 PM
Study the options they ordered and the brochure illustration a little more carefully, 'cause you'll get it in a minute and be really surprised! BP

They did not order the optional Chrome Wheel Discs.

Mr. Bill
07-14-2012, 06:52 PM
Ah, wheel "discs" instead of wheel "covers." Most unusual on an almost $5,000 1956 automobile that was supposed to be more upscale.

Craig, beginning in 1955, Packards utilized an upfront air conditioning system that ducted through two pop-up vents on the dashboard. The vents had the inscription "Modern Air" inscribed onto them. Below are two examples that show the vents opened and closed.

Bill Sapp
Hamlet, NC
http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQ7u71PNHOpZIbrdB6squulwjWwESCFFEkyvid0wOLKc0my3WnX0whttp://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQM29cYdrV8IdoelUETf2kHk-RM9CNtQHnaSyRCPeSUA4flC3tq

BobPalma
07-14-2012, 07:01 PM
They did not order the optional Chrome Wheel Discs.

BINGO! Can you imagine ordering all those options, including White Wall tires, and taking delivery of that pretty car with dog-dish hub caps on it?

Well, it must've happened...or they figured out they forgot them and Dad found a set to put on it for them. BP

8E45E
07-14-2012, 07:09 PM
Mr. Palma: Don't forget the 1954 Pontiac "8" models that could be optioned with the fully integrated Harrison supplied through the dashboard factory air conditioning. This was the first year air conditioning was available in a Pontiac and was the basis for integrated air conditioning in GM cars in the future.

Here's the Motor Trend's tests on both Nash and Pontiac:

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7113/7571186980_6e1c80726c_b.jpg

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8007/7571206622_ed0ffa4260_b.jpg

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8027/7571202304_8fa420a524_b.jpg

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7110/7571193062_7e7c97cdc0_b.jpg

8E45E
07-14-2012, 07:23 PM
Craig, beginning in 1955, Packards utilized an upfront air conditioning system that ducted through two pop-up vents on the dashboard. The vents had the inscription "Modern Air" inscribed onto them. Below are two examples that show the vents opened and closed.


I do know Studebaker retained the trunk-mounted evaporator with the tubes on the rear shelf in 1956. It makes sense that Packard went to the under-dash unit as Studebaker didn't offer any convertibles in those years, now that I see your photos.

Craig

BobPalma
07-14-2012, 07:37 PM
If that brochure car had air conditioning, it would have the clear plastic tubes in the corners of the rear package shelf, and would be clearly visible. Craig

Craig, 1955 and 1956 Packards did not have the trunk-mounted evaporators of old.

They were integral, in-dash units with two little vents on top of the dashboard to blow cold air on you. Those vents had flip-open covers so you could open or close them at will.

Here's a poor reproduction of Plate 1 from the appropriate Packard Parts Book, but there's enough here so you can see the major components of the system and where they were located:

http://packardinfo.com/xoops/html/modules/myalbum/photo.php?lid=1026

Mr. Bill
07-14-2012, 07:38 PM
Yes, Studebaker utilized an air conditioning system sourced from NOVI that was trunk mounted beginning mid-year '55 and continuing through the '57 model year. I have also seen one '58 Packard hardtop and one '58 President sedan with these systems. I assume they were leftover stock (either factory or dealer installed?) as the Packard had the correct "Packard Car Air Conditioning System" tag and the Studebaker had the "Studebaker Car Air Conditioning System" tag. These tags were in place of the standard NOVI labels and I feel this was an attempt by Studebaker-Packard to give the impression that these sytems were a genuine Studebaker-Packard manufactured unit.

With the 1957 Packards being built off the Studebaker President platform, the Packard in dash air conditioning units went away, replaced by the units Studebaker used, first the NOVI trunk system and beginning in '58, the Sutton under dash system - about as homely an appearing under dash box one could want - in my opinion, of course. However, this system made air conditioning a reality for station wagon models.

Bill Sapp
Hamlet, NC

BobPalma
07-14-2012, 07:42 PM
Thanks for the input and 1955/1956 Packard clarification for Craig, Bill. I was searching for an appropriate illustration and you were busy posting!

Anyway, good work all around on the Great Air Conditioning Discussion. :!: BP