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studelover
07-19-2007, 08:21 PM
After visiting the tucker museum with my club my views have changed. I had been trying to build the hawk with great expectations however the motor size and configuation will only do but so much. When I was looking at the motor and contents of the tucker it made me realize that there are some things that should be left undone. I will continue to finish the hawk however when I start the next project I will focus on using air as the tool of high horse power. The tucker museum that I visited had a motor that tucker was experimenting with with a turbo charger. I see now that boost, forced air, ffuel injection is where it's at in the future of hot rodding. I now understand what needs to be done![:p]I will leave you with the proto type motor tucker was working on this not the final helicopter motor. http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v145/mr1940/IMG_0605.jpg
Studebakers forever!

Roscomacaw
07-20-2007, 08:09 PM
I don't see anything that looks like turbocharging on this engine. It DOES look to have fuel injection on it tho.
Turbo-charging & Super-charging have been around for years! Even as far back as WWI, there was experimental turbo-charging on aircraft engines.[^]

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle
http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/906179/2006/12/7/truckonhill3.jpg

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

studelover
07-20-2007, 09:52 PM
There is no turbo charging on that motor, I said he was experimenting with it.The motor you are looking at in this pic is his first attempt, this motor was 8used in the tin goose for a period. In the gentlemans motor room there must have been 8 different motors. Some had automatic trans some had standart shifts. This is what they ended up with.http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v145/mr1940/IMG_0615.jpg

Studebakers forever!

Mike
07-21-2007, 03:58 AM
The first picture is of the engine in the "test mule". It's mounted with the crankshaft across the chassis. The wheels are driven through torque converters on each end of the crank; without transmission gears or differential!
I don't think it's fuel injected. The thing that looks like an FI distributor, is a system that opens the valves hydraulically; without a camshaft and the usual tappets, push rods, and rockers. Think of the possibilities for variable valve timing!
The mule looked drivable, when I saw it a few years ago; with a gas tank, seat, and instruments rigged up. It looked like it was built for testing. It wasn't just a mock up, made for show. I don't think the innovations were so much unworkable, as difficult to put in production quickly.
The fifty or so Tuckers that were built were much more conventional; with a version of the "Cord" transaxle, (two were automatics!), and conventional valve trains. They still had some innovative features.

Mike M.

Roscomacaw
07-21-2007, 11:48 AM
Yeah, silly of me to say FI when a carb is clearly visible to the right of the photo![8]
Still, both engines are obviously water-cooled variants of a flat six. These were adaptations of an air-cooled aviation powerplant (seems I've read "helicopter engine").
I've had the pleasure of hearing one of these things run a number of times and even got to drive one less than a mile. Pretty neat - with an exhaust note to die for![:p]

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle
http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/906179/2006/12/7/truckonhill3.jpg

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

wally
07-21-2007, 01:17 PM
I've read that the Tucker engines were originally designed for use in Helicopters, and produced for that application for many years afterward. It figures that development of Fuel injection would be a priority for aircraft use. But, I can't see that it is used on the test engine shown. There is a Tucker Registry online, that tracks the survivors, including the one that was eventually mounted on a 65 Ford LTD Chassis, front engine and all. Tuckers are 6-figure collectibles, now. Think about it, when you consider Chevy-izing your Hawk. Oh, to keep the thread Studebaker relevant , didn't the film about Tucker destroy a number of 50-51's just to entertain everyone? [:0]

Guido
07-21-2007, 01:56 PM
Wally,

I believe that several bullet nose's were made over to look like Tucker's and sacrificed in the movie. The late Sam Miller made a number of models that appeared in the movie. You may want to drop lstude (Leonard Shepherd) an e-mail off the Forum for specific information as he was a good friend of Sam's (but I do not think visits the technical side of the forum).

Gary (a bottom drawer guy in a top shelf world)

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/53/453/1/21/36/2964121360097493054pVJTFL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/57/757/2/88/4/2023288040097493054SEKowB_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/18/19/8/37/21/2050837210097493054IYBJJL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/559/1/43/57/2876143570097493054jKVhDw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/22/22/0/2/68/2589002680097493054ftBuBw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/8/30/30/2075830300097493054aSSlFv_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/459/2/23/86/2067223860097493054YoeGMx_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/5/18/33/2537518330097493054OgEKcN_th.jpg
Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

Studebaker horse drawn doctor’s buggy; Studebaker horse drawn “Izzer” buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures" (including a 1959 IH B-120 4 wheel drive and numerous Oliver and Cockshutt tractors).

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

lstude
07-21-2007, 04:36 PM
quote:You may want to drop lstude (Leonard Shepherd) and e-mail off the Forum for specific information as he was a good friend of Sam's (but I do not think visits the technical side of the forum).


Actually I'm on the technical forum quite often with questions about my 52. I just posted one last night.

Here are pictures of the Studebaker dressed as a Tucker that flipped over in the movie.

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/lstude1/StudebakerusedinTuckermoviefront.jpg

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/lstude1/StudebakerusedinTuckermovierear.jpg

Leonard Shepherd
http://leonardshepherd.com/

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/lstude1/Mein64DaytonaatBradfieldssm2.jpghttp://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/lstude1/AlmostreadyforSB6-4.jpg

studelover
07-21-2007, 07:24 PM
I thought I would share this with you because it was very interesting.In my travels I come accross many different people, places and things. It does have something to do with studebakers because P. Tucker did work for P/A for a brief moment. It is no surprize that the 1950-51 billet nose looks like a tucker. The motors were bought from the franklin co.This was for entertainment purposes only, I know that all you all want to know about is Studebakers it's ok I don't have a preference, I like all makes, I just happen to be working on a Studebaker at this time.[8D]

Studebakers forever!