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View Full Version : Why You Need a Battery Hold-Down



BobPalma
07-04-2012, 08:18 AM
See Images 31 through 34:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/1951-Studebaker-Commander-Starlight-Coupe-Very-Nice-Example-/221063769926?pt=US_Cars_Trucks&hash=item33786d6f46

I mean, really, if you want $27,500 for a nice '51, couldn't you 'spring $33.50 for a new, correct battery hold-down at nearby Studebaker International? It's in the same Indianapolis Metropolitan area, for Pete's sake. :rolleyes:

(Yes, Ted Harbit already knows about this car....but I'm not sure Mary Ann does! :D) BP

2R5
07-04-2012, 08:26 AM
Well Bob , at least they could put the battery in the correct place !

BobPalma
07-04-2012, 08:29 AM
Well Bob, at least they could put the battery in the correct place!

Right. I hope the battery tray isn't so badly rusted that the position shown is the "new" one! :ohmy: BP

studebaker-R2-4-me
07-04-2012, 08:33 AM
Makes you wonder why the photographer could not straighten out the battery before the pictures were taken having seen it had falling out of it's perch and they want close to 30K for a 51 without a battery hold down? That is just crazy!

Allen

BobPalma
07-04-2012, 08:36 AM
Makes you wonder why the photographer could not straighten out the battery before the pictures were taken having seen it had falling out of it's perch and they want close to 30K for a 51 without a battery hold down? That is just crazy! Allen

That would be my opinion as well, Allen! :cool: BP

r1lark
07-04-2012, 08:41 AM
Maybe we should add this to the list of things to do when a new Studebaker is purchased........besides changing oil, checking the O/D oil level, etc:

28) Ensure your car has the correct battery hold down -- or endure the wrath of BP! :eek:

:D:lol::!:

BobPalma
07-04-2012, 08:47 AM
Right, Paul: Forewarned is Forearmed! :!: BP

50starlite
07-04-2012, 08:47 AM
I'd guess that the battery was temporally installed to be able to move the car out of storage for pictures.

Roscomacaw
07-04-2012, 08:59 AM
Reading the description of this car, I have to wonder what publication they lifted it or it's facts from. Also, when you click on the photos to bring up more of them, the photos are all labeled "1952 Studebaker". But hey - for what we can see - battery clamp aside - it looks like a decent example. 27K's worth???, I don't think so. Ya hafta wonder what the owner might get after paying the broker.
I don't know why, but the remark about it's "rugged reliability" struck me. This guy drives it once or twice and it's rugged reliability impresses him? I'd have to think the long-lasting flavor of Juicy Fruit gum would really bowl this guy over.

52hawk
07-04-2012, 09:14 AM
The negative cable looks barely long enough to reach the battery,if it were where it belonged. Anyway,it was probably a cool day and they leaned the battery against the engine to warm it up.

jclary
07-04-2012, 09:27 AM
Looking a little closer at the photos reveals that the car is suffering from what appears to be some rather crude home-made wiring. The battery cables look puny and short which might be the reason the hold down is off so that the ground wire will reach the battery post. Also note that the radiator cap is off.

Using a rather canned historical description for his sales pitch suggest to me that the seller is kinda lazy in his knowledge and enthusiasm for the car. I am sure it has a history that any serious buyer would want to know before laying out big bucks. I certainly would want more than cosmetic information before laying out top retail dollars for a car like this.

The missing radiator cap, under hood missing paint (or burn mark), condition of that early automatic transmission, suspension, ...all require some serious examination.

That said...it is not often you see a Star Light Commander offered for sale that, on the surface, looks this good.

unclemiltie
07-04-2012, 09:57 AM
I think the car should stay in the Indy area. This would be a nice addition to Bob's collection. Wonder if it came from Palma Motors? Maybe we should start that rumor so he buys it

Greenstude
07-04-2012, 09:59 AM
The battery in this picture appears to be too big for the car's battery box. The correct Group 1 is 9 inches long, and is a tight fit in the box. There is another 6-volt battery which is 10.25 inches long, and will not fit. I ran into this problem last month when replacing the battery in our '47 Champion. Our local Delco dealer only had the larger size in stock, although they could have brought in a Group 1. Since I needed the battery immediately (leaving the next morning for the Northeast Zone meet), I found the correct size in stock at NAPA.

JEWELL
07-04-2012, 10:33 AM
Thanks Bob, I just ordered mine(hold-down) from SI. I wonder how many others will?

BobPalma
07-04-2012, 05:23 PM
Good points, everyone.

I am one who discourages "picking" on a car that's not for sale, or one that may be offered by an innocent party like a recently-deceased owner's child or an estate executor.

However, as a car dealer myself, I say that if a dealer offers a car at a price asking every last dime of retail for that make and model at a national level, then the car ought to be just about flawless. That's not to say a 1951 Commander Starlight couldn't be a high-20s car, but it would have to be the very best one in the country, period. And the subject offering is not it by any stretch of the imagination.

For $27,500, the asking price, the buyer would have the right to expect virtually perfect electricals, with a reproduction wiring harness having been properly installed, a battery and cables of the correct size (probably new), and a correct battery hold-down bracket and fasteners in place. No excuses.

And even then, when you're done with the subject car, you'd still have the cheaper, less-popular Regal (C3) trim (8,192 produced), rather than the nicer, more popular State (C5) trim; 11,637 produced.

The subject offering has a long way to go to get to $27,500, for sure.

Now, how about a little market research to exercise the old CMB (Cranial Memory Bank)?

In 1951, the Commander State Starlight coupe handily outsold the cheaper Regal Starlight coupe, as noted above: 11,637 to 8,192.

However, in 1952, the trim levels swapped popularity: The Regal Starlight outsold the State Starlight, 5,127 to 3,874.

What was it about the 1952 model year that might account for that flip-flop in model popularity? BP

gohdes
07-04-2012, 05:36 PM
the ground appears to be a red cable with black electrical tape wrapped around it. If it's a 6-volt, wouldn't the colors be the other way around? Or is this a 12-volt?

BobPalma
07-04-2012, 05:53 PM
the ground appears to be a red cable with black electrical tape wrapped around it. If it's a 6-volt, wouldn't the colors be the other way around? Or is this a 12-volt?

It's still 6-volt, Eric. It just looks like both battery cables are the same color, red.

'Nothing alarming, although not neat and tidy, for sure. BP

62champ
07-04-2012, 06:48 PM
My bet is the battery hold down is in the same place as the radiator cap... ;)

Actually looks like the negative cable is keeping the battery from falling onto the valve cover.

50starlite
07-04-2012, 07:04 PM
"In 1951, the Commander State Starlight coupe handily outsold the cheaper Regal Starlight coupe, as noted above: 11,637 to 8,192.

However, in 1952, the trim levels swapped popularity: The Regal Starlight outsold the State Starlight, 5,127 to 3,874.

What was it about the 1952 model year that might account for that flip-flop in model popularity? BP"

Bob,
Maybe the 52 hardtop was a factor that year?

BobPalma
07-04-2012, 09:19 PM
"In 1951, the Commander State Starlight coupe handily outsold the cheaper Regal Starlight coupe, as noted above: 11,637 to 8,192.

However, in 1952, the trim levels swapped popularity: The Regal Starlight outsold the State Starlight, 5,127 to 3,874.

What was it about the 1952 model year that might account for that flip-flop in model popularity? BP"

Bob,
Maybe the 52 hardtop was a factor that year?

BINGO! That's right, Dick.

We would naturally expect the new Starliner Hardtop to bleed sales from the same trim level Starlight Coupe. The Starlight Coupe, while "cool" with its wrap-around rear window treatment, was becoming old hat compared with the sporty new pillarless hardtops de jour.

However, the new State Starliner was a full 15% more ($2488 versus $2115) than a cheaper Regal Starlight, so folks who might have wanted a State Starliner could save 15% by getting a Regal Starlight, tempting many to do just that and causing it to outsell the State Starlight, which was closer in price to the State Starliner. BP

dnevin
07-04-2012, 09:36 PM
Hmmm. I was thinking about moving the battery to the trunk on my car but I'm afraid Bob will disown me since I wouldn't be using the official hold down.

I'm going to have to rethink this. I very much want to keep Bob on my side. :)

BobPalma
07-04-2012, 09:43 PM
Hmmm. I was thinking about moving the battery to the trunk on my car but I'm afraid Bob will disown me since I wouldn't be using the official hold down.

I'm going to have to rethink this. I very much want to keep Bob on my side. :)

Hey, 'not a problem, Dave. I don't really care where anybody has a vehicle's battery so long as it is properly secured. :!:

'Doesn't even have to be an official Studebaker hold-down part, either: My 1964 Daytona sedan came to me with a bogus universal (but perfectly usable) battery hold-down when I bought it ten years ago this summer...and it's still on the car. :cool: BP

dnevin
07-05-2012, 12:37 AM
Hey, 'not a problem, Dave. I don't really care where anybody has a vehicle's battery so long as it is properly secured. :!:

'Doesn't even have to be an official Studebaker hold-down part, either: My 1964 Daytona sedan came to me with a bogus universal (but perfectly usable) battery hold-down when I bought it ten years ago this summer...and it's still on the car. :cool: BP

Whew! Now that's a relief. :D

PlainBrownR2
07-05-2012, 12:42 AM
http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/55%20Studebaker%20Commander%20Streetrod%20Project/0427001737.jpg

There are many ways to hold down a battery, even the trunk mounted ones. The main idea is to strap it to something solid so it can't break loose, or have the battery flopping around loose when the car is moving :cool:. Mine involved putting two rods(front and back) through the trunk floor, and having one drop down when the battery needs to come out, and bolting through a mending strap when the battery is put back in. Oh, and no bungee cords, might as well use rubber bands and twine if we're going that route

BobPalma
07-05-2012, 05:37 AM
There are many ways to hold down a battery, even the trunk mounted ones. The main idea is to strap it to something solid so it can't break loose, or have the battery flopping around loose when the car is moving :cool:. Mine involved putting two rods(front and back) through the trunk floor, and having one drop down when the battery needs to come out, and bolting through a mending strap when the battery is put back in. Oh, and no bungee cords, might as well use rubber bands and twine if we're going that route.

Good point, John; thanks! Bungee Cords don't count. :eek: BP