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View Full Version : Argh! Thought I had a 44



JimC
07-03-2012, 09:11 AM
I was adding some fluid to the rear diff on the '63, and while I was down there I thought I would knock a little bit of caking off the rear in anticipation of the new rear seal I hope to install soon. But when I started wiping around the rear passenger side of the housing, a very distinct, raised "27" became apparent.

Correct me if I'm wrong, but that 27 denotes this being a Dana 27, correct? I don't know where I got the idea, but I assumed I had a 44 on the rear of this thing. Having said that, it's not bad. It's got a 3.07 to 1 ratio, and it's Twin Traction, but still, I was thinking that I'd have something a little more substantial in there. Ah well, win some, lose some.

Skip Lackie
07-03-2012, 09:14 AM
Yup. A 259?

candbstudebakers
07-03-2012, 10:02 AM
One does not need to see the tag to tell a 27 from a 44 size of tube tells it all.

JimC
07-03-2012, 10:13 AM
Yup. A 259?
Sure is. I guess this effectively ends my hope of just "dropping in" a 289 at one point. Truthfully, even with the 259 and the 3.07 gear ratio, it still has enough get up and go to keep me entertained, (so long as I start in first !)

JimC
07-03-2012, 10:15 AM
One does not need to see the tag to tell a 27 from a 44 size of tube tells it all.
True, but I have inexperience on my side. Remember, this is my first Studebaker that rolls under it's own power ;) And that's why I'm here. If I knew everything, I wouldn't need to hang out with all the geniuses here :) (Though realistically, I probably still would)

BobPalma
07-03-2012, 10:31 AM
Jim: I don't think you should hit hit the panic button about this unless you plan to run it really hard. At this point in time, the keyed axle is the weaker link of the whole rear end. Be sure your hub nuts are tight at the ends of those rear axles. At least 160-180 ft/lbs, and that's a lot. Follow the instructions for tightening in the appropriate Shop Manual.

Too, the easiest way to destroy a 27 (as opposed to a 44) is to spin one wheel, like an open rear end would do when stuck in ice or snow and somebody goes nuts spinning the slipping wheel in frustration. The spider gears within the actual differential mechanism are more of a problem than anything else, so as long as you don't go around spinning one wheel to show off, which is difficult with a Twin Traction anyway, you shouldn't have much to worry about.

Both my 1964 Daytona sedan and convertible have Model 27s behind their 180 HP 259s and I don't worry about them at all. (But I let Ted Harbit do the hot-shoe on the drag strip on my behalf, too...in hotter Studebakers than I'll ever own! ;)) BP

Dick Steinkamp
07-03-2012, 10:45 AM
I don't think I'd worry much about the Dana 27...259 or 289. They are still a pretty stout rear end. The worst that can happen is that it breaks at some point and you have to change it out, but I doubt if that will ever happen...unless you plan to put the miles on a quarter mile at a time. ;)

Also, I'm far from a purist, but I think I'd just enjoy that car for what it is. The 3.07 gives it a nice, quiet (well, relatively quiet :)) highway cruise and good fuel mileage. The second gear start makes for smooth around town driving with minimal shifts. The combination of the two makes it a little pokey off the line, but ALL cars are compromises. It's a slippery slope from a money standpoint to go quicker and faster...especially with Stude power. (I hope this advice isn't another sign of my advancing years :ohmy:)

candbstudebakers
07-03-2012, 11:19 AM
Dick, call me if you find time today....Bob

studegary
07-03-2012, 01:08 PM
All of the Studebaker V8 differentials that I have seen failure in were all 27s and failed in normal driving.

StudeRich
07-03-2012, 01:37 PM
All FOUR of the Dana Model 27 rear axle equipped Studes. I have owned that failed before and some after purchase, lost their spider gears, and TWO of them were due to a 289 transplant, all were "Street" driven hard by "other people".

So I have to agree with Gary L. and Bob P.



"Argh! Thought I had a 44" ...Well you shoulda had a (bigger) V-8! :lol:

rockne10
07-03-2012, 07:03 PM
I swapped Désirée's 232 for a 289 and changed out the rear for a 27 with 3.07 and TT. As Bob indicated, I'm more leery of the tapered axles. I have no intention of wasting rubber or drag racing. My intention is a smooth comfortable ride at a fast clip with maximum fuel economy.
Seems to be working as planned.:)

bezhawk
07-03-2012, 07:26 PM
I snapped an axle and had the wheel pass me on a 64 Daytona I once owned. Folded up the 1/4 panel pretty good.

1962larksedan
07-03-2012, 07:49 PM
I swapped Désirée's 232 for a 289 and changed out the rear for a 27 with 3.07 and TT. As Bob indicated, I'm more leery of the tapered axles. I have no intention of wasting rubber or drag racing. My intention is a smooth comfortable ride at a fast clip with maximum fuel economy.
Seems to be working as planned.:)

My 1962 Lark was a Dana 27 car with 3:31 gears; I pitched it in favor of a 1970's Ford 8" with 2:79's. Between the tapered axles and high numeric ratio, the choice was easy especially with a Chevy 350 and TH 350.

candbstudebakers
07-03-2012, 08:18 PM
[QUOTE=bezhawk;659156]I snapped an axle and had the wheel pass me on a 64 Daytona I once owned. Folded up the 1/4 panel pretty good.[/QUOT

Snapping an axle has nothing to do with it being a 27 or 44, if an axle is going to snap it just will, only lost one and that was a 44 tt 3.73

Warren Webb
07-03-2012, 11:25 PM
I got my 62 convertible in 1988 & didn't know about the different rear ends & their weaknesses. It came with a 27 rear with 3:73 gears, so I bought from Newman-Altman another 27 with 3:73 gears in a twin traction. Wish I had known I could have gotten the 44 instead but I was just into Stude ownership after a 22 year gap. I figure now that if anything happens, at least I have something to fall back on.