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View Full Version : Cold air induction on a Lark with cowl intake



Jeff T.
07-15-2007, 08:28 PM
I had this thought while reading a recent topic on cold air induction on a Hawk body.

As far as cold air induction on a 61-66 lark body with the cowl vent, I figure that one could take a hole saw and drill an intake in the firewall, weld a flange to the fire wall and fabricate some sort of tubing to connect to the air cleaner. (although you would have to work around the distributor)

A vent off the cowl intake would be easier that an intake off of the scope under the grille as least in the plumbing aspect. It would also be easier than welding up a cowl induction hood (although the hood would look cool).

Well thats the cliff's note version... is it practical. I would like to get clean air into my Lark but I would hate to freeze up my carburator in the process.

Jeff T.

"I'm getting nowhere as fast as I can"
The Replacements.

laughinlark
07-15-2007, 09:23 PM
Hey Jeff
I remember seeing somewhere in a hot rod book where the inner headlight of a dual light set up was removed and plumbed for intake air. One for each four barrel. [8D] It might have been like they did on a F*^d Thunderbolt. I know I saw it on a Stude somewhere. On the 59 & 60 Larks the heater & fresh air ducts can be used the sameway real easy. I saw that on a Studalac in the 80's.

Gordon

PlainBrownR2
07-15-2007, 09:45 PM
If I remember right, Myer's Lark "Spooky" is done up in that fashion. The lights were removed and plumbed for the fresh air ducts. The setup isnt particularly difficult, you're looking for "as straight a line" from somewhere on the front of the car to the air cleaner. The hard part is where do you want to put the entry of the ducting, whether cut a hole in the fender, through a headlight housing, or through the cowl, etc. I guess the typical way is fashioning a hood with a ram air scoop. But with some duct, a box or a cone to house the air filter, and some clamps, this can be the cheaper alternative way to a scoop. The humor about it is there are kits fitted for the imports these days. Whats funny is they are routed from under the bumper up into the engine compartment, so on rainy days when the cars run through the puddles, the water can get sucked up into the engine. [:O)]


1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
1950 Studebaker 2R5 with 170 turbocharged
[img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00003.jpg?t=1171152673[/img=left]
[img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00009.jpg?t=1171153019[/img=right]
[img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00002.jpg?t=1171153180[/img=left]
[img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00005.jpg?t=1171153370[/img=right]

laughinlark
07-15-2007, 10:14 PM
Your right about watching out for where the air intake comes from! We had a county car with 2,000 miles that had the air inlet below the bumper. They tried to go through a flooded area. Well, the car started to die, so they put their foot to the floor so it wouldn't die. It sucked so much water that the engine did a hyd lock and died. It bent two out of six rods. So before you drive a brand x car through flood water! Disconnect the air intake duct at the high point before you attempt the water crossing.

Gordon

skyway
07-16-2007, 01:34 PM
Yes, Jeff's idea will work. One of the since departed, local club guys did just that years ago on his '63 Lark. He claimed a noticable improvement in hot St. Louis weather.

Unfortunately, I can't remember if it was a 6 or 8 cylinder engine. My recollection tho' is that the hole was cut such that he basically just ran the stock aircleaner with the horn (maybe shortened?)and turned to the rear. Beware that such a set up is vulnerable in a HEAVY rain. A real direct path to the carb from a high pressure area, with no time/space to dispatch the water.

Mike Van Veghten
07-16-2007, 04:04 PM
Jeff T. -

Your idea is "basically" what GM did to the Z-11 409's and to the 67, Z-28's. A big steel (409), plastic (Z-28) piece fastened to the firewall in line with the open cowl and a flex connection to the air cleaner.

And don't worry about water....just don't put your holes at the very bottom of the part of the cowl you're going into. That way the cowl drains will keep water out of the engine.

Mike

ROADRACELARK
07-16-2007, 05:39 PM
Jeff,Gordon,PBR2,

See picture below. ;) Right highbeam headlight and bucket removed, 4" fresh ram-air straight back to the retangular inlet of the factory R-2 aircleaner. Left highbeam headlight and bucket removed, 4" inlet to the plenum, force feeding air across the inner-cooler. It works:) Ask me how I know.[}:)]

Dan Miller
Atlanta, GA

[img=left]http://static.flickr.com/57/228744729_7aff5f0118_m.jpg[/img=left]
Road Racers turn left AND right.

PlainBrownR2
07-16-2007, 08:37 PM
Oh theres no doubt it works. It saves on having to fab a hood with a scoop or getting the sawzall for the all important cutting out a center section of the hood. :). This probably applies more to the modern cars as ours(well most of us anyways) dont have all of that twisting snakelike plumbing going from the air inlet to the air filter to the intake manifold. As long its as straight a line from the source of air to the filter or manifold, thats one of the biggest things to remember.


1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
1950 Studebaker 2R5 with 170 turbocharged
[img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00003.jpg?t=1171152673[/img=left]
[img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00009.jpg?t=1171153019[/img=right]
[img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00002.jpg?t=1171153180[/img=left]
[img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00005.jpg?t=1171153370[/img=right]

PlainBrownR2
07-16-2007, 08:44 PM
I just had another thought cross my mind. I have seen a few setups involving louvered hoods and I thought, if an under hood cowl induction setup could be done, it would also help dispel heat as well. I know more than a few of us have that problem. Through installing a cowl induction setup, it would help the heat escape the engine compartment some on those 90 degree days where the traffic is bumper to bumper and theres no airflow in the front of the car.

ROADRACELARK
07-16-2007, 09:13 PM
PBR2,

The main trouble with louvers is it's real hard to keep the engine room clean and shiney with dust,dirt,water etc, coming in. Yes, it does let the heat out, but at that expense. I've never had any temp. issues either. I run 2 electric fans in front of the stock radiator, 180 degree thermostat. Also diluted antifreeze, to only 0 degrees instead of 50/50 that goes to -34. Much better heat transfer at 0. Just my experience. ;)

Dan Miller
Atlanta, GA

[img=left]http://static.flickr.com/57/228744729_7aff5f0118_m.jpg[/img=left]
Road Racers turn left AND right.