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studebakerjeff
07-10-2007, 06:09 PM
Why are most of the Studebakers you see for sale on the west coast? Is it because they sold more cars there?, or did rust get most of the east coast Studebakers?

1950 Champion business coupe

JDP
07-10-2007, 06:23 PM
Much higher survival rate, the bodies don't rust away.

JDP/Maryland
64 Daytona HT/R2 clone
64 GT R2
63 GT R2
63 Lark 2 door
59 3E truck
58 Starlight
52 & 53 Starliner
51 Commander

JDP
07-10-2007, 06:23 PM
Much higher survival rate, the bodies don't rust away.

JDP/Maryland
64 Daytona HT/R2 clone
64 GT R2
63 GT R2
63 Lark 2 door
59 3E truck
58 Starlight
52 & 53 Starliner
51 Commander

starlightchamp
07-10-2007, 06:24 PM
Yes, partly due to the lack of salt on the roads and moderate weather more Studebakers survived. Another reason is that Studebakers were produced in Vernon California up to the mid 50's. My 50 Starlight was built at the Vernon plant in August of 1949. I'm not sure when
Vernon stopped making Studes.
...Dick

1950 Champion Starlight
1963 Hawk GT
Santa Barbara
CA
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/125/368321841_7d3a05da00_t.jpg
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/185/367175252_40e3cec1d9_t.jpg

starlightchamp
07-10-2007, 06:24 PM
Yes, partly due to the lack of salt on the roads and moderate weather more Studebakers survived. Another reason is that Studebakers were produced in Vernon California up to the mid 50's. My 50 Starlight was built at the Vernon plant in August of 1949. I'm not sure when
Vernon stopped making Studes.
...Dick

1950 Champion Starlight
1963 Hawk GT
Santa Barbara
CA
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/125/368321841_7d3a05da00_t.jpg
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/185/367175252_40e3cec1d9_t.jpg

8E45E
07-10-2007, 06:24 PM
quote:Originally posted by studebakerjeff

Why are most of the Studebakers you see for sale on the west coast? Is it because they sold more cars there?, or did rust get most of the east coast Studebakers?

1950 Champion business coupe


You're more correct on the second count. It is dryer out west, and nowhere near as much salt is used on the roads out west in areas they do use it. California has a population greater than all of Canada, which would explain why there's so many survivors in that state.

Craig.

8E45E
07-10-2007, 06:24 PM
quote:Originally posted by studebakerjeff

Why are most of the Studebakers you see for sale on the west coast? Is it because they sold more cars there?, or did rust get most of the east coast Studebakers?

1950 Champion business coupe


You're more correct on the second count. It is dryer out west, and nowhere near as much salt is used on the roads out west in areas they do use it. California has a population greater than all of Canada, which would explain why there's so many survivors in that state.

Craig.

starlightchamp
07-10-2007, 06:52 PM
FWIW attached is the Vernon California plant. IIRC last car produced was in 1956.

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1205/771768757_d7694ff4f4.jpg?v=0

starlightchamp
07-10-2007, 06:52 PM
FWIW attached is the Vernon California plant. IIRC last car produced was in 1956.

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1205/771768757_d7694ff4f4.jpg?v=0

showbizkid
07-10-2007, 07:02 PM
quote:Originally posted by starlightchamp

FWIW attached is the Vernon California plant. IIRC last car produced was in 1956.

I just read Fred Fox's article on '59 Larks in the June '96 TW, and he confirms your recollection [^]


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

showbizkid
07-10-2007, 07:02 PM
quote:Originally posted by starlightchamp

FWIW attached is the Vernon California plant. IIRC last car produced was in 1956.

I just read Fred Fox's article on '59 Larks in the June '96 TW, and he confirms your recollection [^]


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

wagone
07-10-2007, 07:58 PM
Was the Vernon plant merely assembly (as I assume) or were body panels, etc., stamped out there? It would, though, seem expensive to ship all parts to the coast from SB. To inventory and pack everything would seem to be a killer on cost, but those were (very) different times.

wagone and the R2 Avanti

wagone
07-10-2007, 07:58 PM
Was the Vernon plant merely assembly (as I assume) or were body panels, etc., stamped out there? It would, though, seem expensive to ship all parts to the coast from SB. To inventory and pack everything would seem to be a killer on cost, but those were (very) different times.

wagone and the R2 Avanti

studeclunker
07-10-2007, 08:08 PM
Yes, one can still go down the freeway and see off-ramps on the 405 for 'Studebaker Road'.

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/december%2006/HPIM0234.jpg http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/56%20Parkview%20Wagon/56wagonleftfrontclipped-1.jpg
Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
Lotsa Larks!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Ron Smith
Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?

studeclunker
07-10-2007, 08:08 PM
Yes, one can still go down the freeway and see off-ramps on the 405 for 'Studebaker Road'.

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/december%2006/HPIM0234.jpg http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/56%20Parkview%20Wagon/56wagonleftfrontclipped-1.jpg
Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
Lotsa Larks!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Ron Smith
Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?

Dick Steinkamp
07-10-2007, 08:15 PM
quote:Originally posted by studeclunker

[font=Comic Sans MS][size=3]Yes, one can still go down the freeway and see off-ramps on the 405 for 'Studebaker Road'.


Yep, but that's in Long Beach...a long ways away from Vernon. I don't think there is any connection.

http://thenobot.org/images/s2d/s2d_01.jpg

Dick Steinkamp
07-10-2007, 08:15 PM
quote:Originally posted by studeclunker

[font=Comic Sans MS][size=3]Yes, one can still go down the freeway and see off-ramps on the 405 for 'Studebaker Road'.


Yep, but that's in Long Beach...a long ways away from Vernon. I don't think there is any connection.

http://thenobot.org/images/s2d/s2d_01.jpg

55studeman
07-10-2007, 08:22 PM
For LA plant: as the saying goes "Made in South Bend, Assembled in LA" -yep, hard to believe! Didn't make sense to me, but then again the heavy, heavy, and EXPENSIVE foundry, dies, and machining equipment would probably far outweigh the cost of loading the train cars and sending them freight but why not assemble them and ship whole cars...........(Hmm? Probably b/c whole car shipments were more expensive then shipping the main parts of a car and buying the tires and generic stuff locally. I'm pretty sure this way of production wouldn't work now days.)

Best Regards,
Eric West
"The Speedster Kid"
Sunny Northern California
Where the roads don't freeze over and the heat doesn't kill you.
And an open road is yours to have -only during non-commute rush hours 9am-4pm and 7pm to 7am (Ha, ha, ha)
55 Speedster "Lemon/Lime" (Beautiful)
55 President State Sedan (Rusty original, but runs great and reliable)

55studeman
07-10-2007, 08:22 PM
For LA plant: as the saying goes "Made in South Bend, Assembled in LA" -yep, hard to believe! Didn't make sense to me, but then again the heavy, heavy, and EXPENSIVE foundry, dies, and machining equipment would probably far outweigh the cost of loading the train cars and sending them freight but why not assemble them and ship whole cars...........(Hmm? Probably b/c whole car shipments were more expensive then shipping the main parts of a car and buying the tires and generic stuff locally. I'm pretty sure this way of production wouldn't work now days.)

Best Regards,
Eric West
"The Speedster Kid"
Sunny Northern California
Where the roads don't freeze over and the heat doesn't kill you.
And an open road is yours to have -only during non-commute rush hours 9am-4pm and 7pm to 7am (Ha, ha, ha)
55 Speedster "Lemon/Lime" (Beautiful)
55 President State Sedan (Rusty original, but runs great and reliable)

lstude
07-10-2007, 09:04 PM
Here is a picture of a train load of Studebaker bodies going from South Bend to California. Of course this one wrecked. I guess it was cheaper to ship bodies this way than individual cars on a truck.

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/lstude1/Studebakerbodiesontraincar.jpg

Leonard Shepherd
http://leonardshepherd.com/

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/lstude1/Mein64DaytonaatBradfieldssm2.jpghttp://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/lstude1/AlmostreadyforSB6-4.jpg

lstude
07-10-2007, 09:04 PM
Here is a picture of a train load of Studebaker bodies going from South Bend to California. Of course this one wrecked. I guess it was cheaper to ship bodies this way than individual cars on a truck.

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/lstude1/Studebakerbodiesontraincar.jpg

Leonard Shepherd
http://leonardshepherd.com/

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/lstude1/Mein64DaytonaatBradfieldssm2.jpghttp://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/lstude1/AlmostreadyforSB6-4.jpg

showbizkid
07-10-2007, 09:41 PM
Great pic Leonard! I was about to say, in those pre-Interstate days rail freight was the way to go. Long-distance trucks were still fighting a fierce battle for significant shipping share and their trailer sizes were strictly Federally limited; every major manufacturer had a rail siding right up to their loading dock, and since tariffs were still Federally regulated too, shipping big lots like car parts by rail was a no-brainer.

Heavy freight was the railroads' to lose... and lose it they did. They are only just now regaining status as preferred shippers to heavy industry.


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

showbizkid
07-10-2007, 09:41 PM
Great pic Leonard! I was about to say, in those pre-Interstate days rail freight was the way to go. Long-distance trucks were still fighting a fierce battle for significant shipping share and their trailer sizes were strictly Federally limited; every major manufacturer had a rail siding right up to their loading dock, and since tariffs were still Federally regulated too, shipping big lots like car parts by rail was a no-brainer.

Heavy freight was the railroads' to lose... and lose it they did. They are only just now regaining status as preferred shippers to heavy industry.


[img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

Clark in San Diego
'63 F2/Lark Standard
http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

lstude
07-10-2007, 11:05 PM
quote:I was about to say, in those pre-Interstate days rail freight was the way to go. Long-distance trucks were still fighting a fierce battle for significant shipping share and their trailer sizes were strictly Federally limited;

In Virginia (and many other states)in the 50s, the speed limit for trucks was 45 MPH, and many trucks couldn't maintain that on hills. It was a whole different world for truckers back then.

Leonard Shepherd
http://leonardshepherd.com/

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/lstude1/Mein64DaytonaatBradfieldssm2.jpghttp://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/lstude1/AlmostreadyforSB6-4.jpg

lstude
07-10-2007, 11:05 PM
quote:I was about to say, in those pre-Interstate days rail freight was the way to go. Long-distance trucks were still fighting a fierce battle for significant shipping share and their trailer sizes were strictly Federally limited;

In Virginia (and many other states)in the 50s, the speed limit for trucks was 45 MPH, and many trucks couldn't maintain that on hills. It was a whole different world for truckers back then.

Leonard Shepherd
http://leonardshepherd.com/

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/lstude1/Mein64DaytonaatBradfieldssm2.jpghttp://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/lstude1/AlmostreadyforSB6-4.jpg

Guido
07-10-2007, 11:08 PM
Leonard,

The truck speed limit was 45 here until well into the '60's as I clearly remember it. The ever increasing network of interstate highways was probably responsible for raising it.

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/53/453/1/21/36/2964121360097493054pVJTFL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/57/757/2/88/4/2023288040097493054SEKowB_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/18/19/8/37/21/2050837210097493054IYBJJL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/559/1/43/57/2876143570097493054jKVhDw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/22/22/0/2/68/2589002680097493054ftBuBw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/8/30/30/2075830300097493054aSSlFv_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/459/2/23/86/2067223860097493054YoeGMx_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/5/18/33/2537518330097493054OgEKcN_th.jpg
Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

Studebaker horse drawn doctor’s buggy; Studebaker horse drawn “Izzer” buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures" (including a 1959 IH B-120 4 wheel drive and numerous Oliver and Cockshutt tractors).

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

Guido
07-10-2007, 11:08 PM
Leonard,

The truck speed limit was 45 here until well into the '60's as I clearly remember it. The ever increasing network of interstate highways was probably responsible for raising it.

http://thumb14.webshots.net/t/53/453/1/21/36/2964121360097493054pVJTFL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/57/757/2/88/4/2023288040097493054SEKowB_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/18/19/8/37/21/2050837210097493054IYBJJL_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/559/1/43/57/2876143570097493054jKVhDw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/22/22/0/2/68/2589002680097493054ftBuBw_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/8/30/30/2075830300097493054aSSlFv_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/59/459/2/23/86/2067223860097493054YoeGMx_th.jpghttp://thumb14.webshots.net/t/28/28/5/18/33/2537518330097493054OgEKcN_th.jpg
Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

Studebaker horse drawn doctor’s buggy; Studebaker horse drawn “Izzer” buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures" (including a 1959 IH B-120 4 wheel drive and numerous Oliver and Cockshutt tractors).

Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.

studebakerjeff
07-10-2007, 11:58 PM
My 50 Studebaker coupe was from the California plant. But you are saying it and the engine was make in Ind. then ship to California? Was that plant just for the west coast or were they sent east as well? Mine has no heater,so it was most likly used on the west coast.



1950 Champion business coupe

studebakerjeff
07-10-2007, 11:58 PM
My 50 Studebaker coupe was from the California plant. But you are saying it and the engine was make in Ind. then ship to California? Was that plant just for the west coast or were they sent east as well? Mine has no heater,so it was most likly used on the west coast.



1950 Champion business coupe

StudeRich
07-11-2007, 12:22 AM
Not necessarly true on the heater, there were ahm...frugal buyers everywhere, and dealers ordering them with less options to keep the price (almost) competitive.

They really never could match Chev. Ford and Plymouth, because you simply cannot build a better car, in smaller quantities for less $$$ !! [:0] Only the '57-'58 Scotsman cars & '57-'59 Scotsman Trucks could do that!

Only a few LA cars made it East of the rockies, only if SB had a shortage of a certain model or a strike etc. They usually supplied the Western US. The bodies, frames, & engines all were shipped for assembly at Vernon, I would guess that's also what happened to some extent in Canada, the bare engine blocks from the foundry for sure were shipped to Hamilton, ONT Canada for assembly & installation.


quote:Originally posted by studebakerjeff

Mine has no heater,so it was most likly used on the west coast.


StudeRich
Studebakers Northwest
Ferndale, WA

StudeRich
07-11-2007, 12:22 AM
Not necessarly true on the heater, there were ahm...frugal buyers everywhere, and dealers ordering them with less options to keep the price (almost) competitive.

They really never could match Chev. Ford and Plymouth, because you simply cannot build a better car, in smaller quantities for less $$$ !! [:0] Only the '57-'58 Scotsman cars & '57-'59 Scotsman Trucks could do that!

Only a few LA cars made it East of the rockies, only if SB had a shortage of a certain model or a strike etc. They usually supplied the Western US. The bodies, frames, & engines all were shipped for assembly at Vernon, I would guess that's also what happened to some extent in Canada, the bare engine blocks from the foundry for sure were shipped to Hamilton, ONT Canada for assembly & installation.


quote:Originally posted by studebakerjeff

Mine has no heater,so it was most likly used on the west coast.


StudeRich
Studebakers Northwest
Ferndale, WA

Jeff_H
07-11-2007, 08:38 AM
quote:In Virginia (and many other states)in the 50s, the speed limit for trucks was 45 MPH, and many trucks couldn't maintain that on hills. It was a whole different world for truckers back then.

I've wondered why trucks were so underpowered in those days. What was the thinking? There were more powerful engines for some cars but the trucks seemed to get the short end, al least through the mid 50s when V8s were finally offered. Yes, low gearing to start the load but no hope of a reasonable top end. We had a nasty old '47 chevy 3/4T on the farm when I was a kid and it was pathetic even unloaded, but you could almost plow with it in low gear. A neighbor had a single axle grain truck of similar vintage with the same engine. Even more load there. Can't imagine it was too speedy with 300 bushels loaded. I've read about model A and T trucks with the same engines as the cars had too. Now it seems that the typical pickup has more power than it needs, given most don't get loaded up with 2,000lbs of cucumbers, or haul a load of wheat or hay like we used to do. Dad used to fill the bed (with sideboards) with seed corn sacks and fertilizer till the front end got light and it was hard to steer :D

Jeff in ND
http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t5/ee-engineer/53byalaketiny.jpg
'53 Champion Hardtop

Jeff_H
07-11-2007, 08:38 AM
quote:In Virginia (and many other states)in the 50s, the speed limit for trucks was 45 MPH, and many trucks couldn't maintain that on hills. It was a whole different world for truckers back then.

I've wondered why trucks were so underpowered in those days. What was the thinking? There were more powerful engines for some cars but the trucks seemed to get the short end, al least through the mid 50s when V8s were finally offered. Yes, low gearing to start the load but no hope of a reasonable top end. We had a nasty old '47 chevy 3/4T on the farm when I was a kid and it was pathetic even unloaded, but you could almost plow with it in low gear. A neighbor had a single axle grain truck of similar vintage with the same engine. Even more load there. Can't imagine it was too speedy with 300 bushels loaded. I've read about model A and T trucks with the same engines as the cars had too. Now it seems that the typical pickup has more power than it needs, given most don't get loaded up with 2,000lbs of cucumbers, or haul a load of wheat or hay like we used to do. Dad used to fill the bed (with sideboards) with seed corn sacks and fertilizer till the front end got light and it was hard to steer :D

Jeff in ND
http://i156.photobucket.com/albums/t5/ee-engineer/53byalaketiny.jpg
'53 Champion Hardtop

HookedonStudies
07-11-2007, 12:47 PM
I would imagine the assembly on the west coast made sense on at least 2 counts. First, the labor in the Midwest was likely a bit higher, and the higher density of shipping parts would make freight significantly less expensive for parts than finished goods. As you can see in Leonard's photo - they could cram lots of bodies in a rail car. Of course derailments would be a bummer whether it was complete cars or parts!

55 Commander
58 Transtar
62 GT Hawk
66 Cruiser

HookedonStudies
07-11-2007, 12:47 PM
I would imagine the assembly on the west coast made sense on at least 2 counts. First, the labor in the Midwest was likely a bit higher, and the higher density of shipping parts would make freight significantly less expensive for parts than finished goods. As you can see in Leonard's photo - they could cram lots of bodies in a rail car. Of course derailments would be a bummer whether it was complete cars or parts!

55 Commander
58 Transtar
62 GT Hawk
66 Cruiser

StudeRich
07-11-2007, 01:18 PM
Just a friendly reminder: our moderator has recommended that we help monitor these!

Ok, Jeff, this great question MORE than qualifies for a NEW TOPIC! Please copy, and paste this in a new topic and delete this one. Thanks, just trying to help keep the search engine working!

I can see that this is a good example of what can happen when someone (in this case Leonard & Clark) just make a slightly off topic, but very related comment, and they never know IF it will trigger a new string of off topic posts! Now Jeff gets caught! Is that fair...who knows!

OPPS, now I am off topic! Please see my new topic: "Off Topic Posts"


quote:Originally posted by Jeff_H

I've wondered why trucks were so underpowered in those days. What was the thinking? There were more powerful engines for some cars but the trucks seemed to get the short end, al least through the mid 50s when V8s were finally offered.

StudeRich
Studebakers Northwest
Ferndale, WA

StudeRich
07-11-2007, 01:18 PM
Just a friendly reminder: our moderator has recommended that we help monitor these!

Ok, Jeff, this great question MORE than qualifies for a NEW TOPIC! Please copy, and paste this in a new topic and delete this one. Thanks, just trying to help keep the search engine working!

I can see that this is a good example of what can happen when someone (in this case Leonard & Clark) just make a slightly off topic, but very related comment, and they never know IF it will trigger a new string of off topic posts! Now Jeff gets caught! Is that fair...who knows!

OPPS, now I am off topic! Please see my new topic: "Off Topic Posts"


quote:Originally posted by Jeff_H

I've wondered why trucks were so underpowered in those days. What was the thinking? There were more powerful engines for some cars but the trucks seemed to get the short end, al least through the mid 50s when V8s were finally offered.

StudeRich
Studebakers Northwest
Ferndale, WA

Swifster
07-11-2007, 02:56 PM
I'll disagree and say this is on topic. Shipping and transportation effect the dealerships selling vehicles in other parts of the country. This is a valid reason to ship parts to the west coast for assembly, and Studebaker wasn't the only one doing this.

Studebaker did extremely well in California with a strong than average dealer network. This alone is a good reason why there are so many cars still there. The weather is another reason. An assembly plant in CA would make sense to keep the supply of cars steady to these dealers.

It's also logical why the plant was closed after '56, as Studebaker was most likely no where near capacity between '54 and '56 (and most likely wouldn't have been until '59/'60).

California is where I bought my car from. There was/is no rust issues with it, unlike the cars in my native midwest. To summarize, the reason the are more cars available on the west coast are;

A dry climate that is friendly to old sheet metal A strong dealer base in CA, WA and TX A west coast assembly plant to keep vehicles supplied to those strong dealers A crude transportation system that encouraged assembly on the west coast instead of transporting completed vehicles from Indiana

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Valrico, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/1965_Studebaker_Commander_front198x.jpg

Swifster
07-11-2007, 02:56 PM
I'll disagree and say this is on topic. Shipping and transportation effect the dealerships selling vehicles in other parts of the country. This is a valid reason to ship parts to the west coast for assembly, and Studebaker wasn't the only one doing this.

Studebaker did extremely well in California with a strong than average dealer network. This alone is a good reason why there are so many cars still there. The weather is another reason. An assembly plant in CA would make sense to keep the supply of cars steady to these dealers.

It's also logical why the plant was closed after '56, as Studebaker was most likely no where near capacity between '54 and '56 (and most likely wouldn't have been until '59/'60).

California is where I bought my car from. There was/is no rust issues with it, unlike the cars in my native midwest. To summarize, the reason the are more cars available on the west coast are;

A dry climate that is friendly to old sheet metal A strong dealer base in CA, WA and TX A west coast assembly plant to keep vehicles supplied to those strong dealers A crude transportation system that encouraged assembly on the west coast instead of transporting completed vehicles from Indiana

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Valrico, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/1965_Studebaker_Commander_front198x.jpg