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View Full Version : Help needed '37 Hood hinges.......



Jimmy Clarke
07-08-2007, 10:28 PM
A while ago I posted a message solicting info from anyone with knowledge of why the back end of my hood needed to be pushed down by hand the last inch or so, after closing. Judging from the replies, this seems to be a common problem with hoods of that era. After numerous attempts at adjustment I realized (part of the problem at least) there was a little "slack" in most of the many pivot points comprising each hood hinge rivot, some (top and bottom) worse than others. Although each pivot point play was minimal, together the total slack is definiately part of the problem. Before I attempt to remove, drill out, and replace each piviot rivot (and spacers), I thought I'd check with you fellas to see if there is somewhere I can purchase (or parts swap) NOS hood hindges for a '37 coupe express, Dictator, or other matching models? Thanks, Jimmy http://community.webshots.com/user/Jimmy655

37CoupeE
07-09-2007, 01:48 AM
I don't believe that there are any NOS hinges available but I could be wrong.
One of the Street rod parts manufactures has duplicated the 37 Studebaker hood hinge in aluminum and is currently selling them.
Last year at the NSRA Milwaukee show a fellow 37 owner told me about them.
I went into the manufactures exhibit and they had a set for sale.
I can't remember the manufacturer or price but next weekend is the NSRA at Milwaukee again and I could see if I can find the again.

37CoupeE
07-09-2007, 01:48 AM
I don't believe that there are any NOS hinges available but I could be wrong.
One of the Street rod parts manufactures has duplicated the 37 Studebaker hood hinge in aluminum and is currently selling them.
Last year at the NSRA Milwaukee show a fellow 37 owner told me about them.
I went into the manufactures exhibit and they had a set for sale.
I can't remember the manufacturer or price but next weekend is the NSRA at Milwaukee again and I could see if I can find the again.

go-studebaker
07-09-2007, 08:22 AM
Hi Jimmy,
I have the same problem on my 1937. I did have a set of NOS hinges on the car, but they pulled up the same way. I cant actually get my hood to close at the back end unless I cut the back plate to modify it so it lowers the hinge.

I changed over to an excellent used set of hinges and still have the same problem. I dont want to sell my new set though, as these I may modify when I can be bothered.

Regards
Greg




Greg Diffen
Australian Stude nut living in Warwick, United Kingdom

1933 St Regis Brougham Model 56 Dutch delivered
1937 Dicator sedan. Australian Body by TJ Richards
1939 Packard Seven Passenger monster UK delivered
1939 Commander Swiss Cabriolet by Lagenthal
1988 Avanti Convertible

go-studebaker
07-09-2007, 08:22 AM
Hi Jimmy,
I have the same problem on my 1937. I did have a set of NOS hinges on the car, but they pulled up the same way. I cant actually get my hood to close at the back end unless I cut the back plate to modify it so it lowers the hinge.

I changed over to an excellent used set of hinges and still have the same problem. I dont want to sell my new set though, as these I may modify when I can be bothered.

Regards
Greg




Greg Diffen
Australian Stude nut living in Warwick, United Kingdom

1933 St Regis Brougham Model 56 Dutch delivered
1937 Dicator sedan. Australian Body by TJ Richards
1939 Packard Seven Passenger monster UK delivered
1939 Commander Swiss Cabriolet by Lagenthal
1988 Avanti Convertible

Jimmy Clarke
07-09-2007, 04:49 PM
Thanks Mike, and Greg. I have an two solutions to the problem, one pretty simple, the other installing an inside center mini hood lock (purchased from Yogi's Rod parts). The easiest way is to fabricate a small, contoured, horizontal lever at the top center inside of the fire wall. I figured if I cut a 3/16th, horizontal slot in the backside of the hood brace, and line it up with the fabricated lever under the dash. The "engagement" side of the lever (the side that mates with the hood slot) could be ground at an angle of maybe 0-10 deg. ensuring full closure. The hood lock on the other hand, would close (and open) with a just a push of pressure from your hand (assuming your realese cable on dash is open). The differance is the 1st method would be all but detectable. I'm still debating which to use. In the meantime, I plan on re-riviting the hinges. By the way...do you guys have your hinges adjusted low in terms of your firewall mounted side? Thanks Jimmy

Jimmy Clarke
07-09-2007, 04:49 PM
Thanks Mike, and Greg. I have an two solutions to the problem, one pretty simple, the other installing an inside center mini hood lock (purchased from Yogi's Rod parts). The easiest way is to fabricate a small, contoured, horizontal lever at the top center inside of the fire wall. I figured if I cut a 3/16th, horizontal slot in the backside of the hood brace, and line it up with the fabricated lever under the dash. The "engagement" side of the lever (the side that mates with the hood slot) could be ground at an angle of maybe 0-10 deg. ensuring full closure. The hood lock on the other hand, would close (and open) with a just a push of pressure from your hand (assuming your realese cable on dash is open). The differance is the 1st method would be all but detectable. I'm still debating which to use. In the meantime, I plan on re-riviting the hinges. By the way...do you guys have your hinges adjusted low in terms of your firewall mounted side? Thanks Jimmy

go-studebaker
07-10-2007, 08:20 AM
Jimmy,
my hinges are adjusted as low as they can go. We even filed them down so they would go lower again, but to no real advantage. My hood does not close at the rear even when pused down with NOS springs or the good used set I hav on the car now.

I dont have a bonnet cable I just have the twist top mechanism of the chrome do dah on the front of the bonnet.

Regards
Greg

Greg Diffen
Australian Stude nut living in Warwick, United Kingdom

1933 St Regis Brougham Model 56 Dutch delivered
1937 Dicator sedan. Australian Body by TJ Richards
1939 Packard Seven Passenger monster UK delivered
1939 Commander Swiss Cabriolet by Lagenthal
1988 Avanti Convertible

go-studebaker
07-10-2007, 08:20 AM
Jimmy,
my hinges are adjusted as low as they can go. We even filed them down so they would go lower again, but to no real advantage. My hood does not close at the rear even when pused down with NOS springs or the good used set I hav on the car now.

I dont have a bonnet cable I just have the twist top mechanism of the chrome do dah on the front of the bonnet.

Regards
Greg

Greg Diffen
Australian Stude nut living in Warwick, United Kingdom

1933 St Regis Brougham Model 56 Dutch delivered
1937 Dicator sedan. Australian Body by TJ Richards
1939 Packard Seven Passenger monster UK delivered
1939 Commander Swiss Cabriolet by Lagenthal
1988 Avanti Convertible

DEEPNHOCK
07-10-2007, 08:38 AM
After reading the replies I am more curious than ever...
I played with mine quite a while to get it right and it will hang the RR corner up a half inch to 3/4 inch about half the time it gets closed. I just push it down, and don't have to push hard at all. I have the stock hinges and springs. The front alignment pin and latch are stock. One difference I have is two gas struts to hold the hood up in the open position. They are liftgate gas cylinders, but are not real high pressure ones. One thing they do to the hood is push it forward when closing. But they are pretty much fully collapsed when the hood is closed, so the gas pressure is pushing straight forward. I find that after removing the lower hood latch plate up front for whatever reason (It has to come off to remove the stainless cover plate on mine to access the front wiring).. I have to re-adjust the plate every time to make sure the latch is located right.
Now... Knowing that my gas cylinders are 'pushing' the hood forward in the closed position...makes me think that this also makes the rear hinges 'pull down' on the hood rear edge.
Did you try keeping the forward hood latch 'loose' and then pull forward on the hood when it is closed to see if the hinges will pull down on the rear edge of the hood?
Those springs on the hinges seem to be mostly there to lift and push forward on the hood during opening to clear the cowl so the paint won't get scraped up. They do hold the hood up 'a bit' but it seems they are more for balance and opening assist than anything else.
I am all ears listening for a good solution...and I have them too[:0]..
Shows what I don't know, huh?;)
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by Jimmy Clarke

Thanks Mike, and Greg. I have an two solutions to the problem, one pretty simple, the other installing an inside center mini hood lock (purchased from Yogi's Rod parts). The easiest way is to fabricate a small, contoured, horizontal lever at the top center inside of the fire wall. I figured if I cut a 3/16th, horizontal slot in the backside of the hood brace, and line it up with the fabricated lever under the dash. The "engagement" side of the lever (the side that mates with the hood slot) could be ground at an angle of maybe 0-10 deg. ensuring full closure. The hood lock on the other hand, would close (and open) with a just a push of pressure from your hand (assuming your realese cable on dash is open). The differance is the 1st method would be all but detectable. I'm still debating which to use. In the meantime, I plan on re-riviting the hinges. By the way...do you guys have your hinges adjusted low in terms of your firewall mounted side? Thanks Jimmy


http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j54/deepnhock/Jeff%20Rice%20Studebaker%20Pictures/1937StudebakerCoupeExpressJeffRicee.jpg

DEEPNHOCK at Gmail.com
Brooklet, Georgia
'37 Coupe Express (never ending project)
'37 Coupe Express Trailer (project)
'61 Hawk (project)
http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

DEEPNHOCK
07-10-2007, 08:38 AM
After reading the replies I am more curious than ever...
I played with mine quite a while to get it right and it will hang the RR corner up a half inch to 3/4 inch about half the time it gets closed. I just push it down, and don't have to push hard at all. I have the stock hinges and springs. The front alignment pin and latch are stock. One difference I have is two gas struts to hold the hood up in the open position. They are liftgate gas cylinders, but are not real high pressure ones. One thing they do to the hood is push it forward when closing. But they are pretty much fully collapsed when the hood is closed, so the gas pressure is pushing straight forward. I find that after removing the lower hood latch plate up front for whatever reason (It has to come off to remove the stainless cover plate on mine to access the front wiring).. I have to re-adjust the plate every time to make sure the latch is located right.
Now... Knowing that my gas cylinders are 'pushing' the hood forward in the closed position...makes me think that this also makes the rear hinges 'pull down' on the hood rear edge.
Did you try keeping the forward hood latch 'loose' and then pull forward on the hood when it is closed to see if the hinges will pull down on the rear edge of the hood?
Those springs on the hinges seem to be mostly there to lift and push forward on the hood during opening to clear the cowl so the paint won't get scraped up. They do hold the hood up 'a bit' but it seems they are more for balance and opening assist than anything else.
I am all ears listening for a good solution...and I have them too[:0]..
Shows what I don't know, huh?;)
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by Jimmy Clarke

Thanks Mike, and Greg. I have an two solutions to the problem, one pretty simple, the other installing an inside center mini hood lock (purchased from Yogi's Rod parts). The easiest way is to fabricate a small, contoured, horizontal lever at the top center inside of the fire wall. I figured if I cut a 3/16th, horizontal slot in the backside of the hood brace, and line it up with the fabricated lever under the dash. The "engagement" side of the lever (the side that mates with the hood slot) could be ground at an angle of maybe 0-10 deg. ensuring full closure. The hood lock on the other hand, would close (and open) with a just a push of pressure from your hand (assuming your realese cable on dash is open). The differance is the 1st method would be all but detectable. I'm still debating which to use. In the meantime, I plan on re-riviting the hinges. By the way...do you guys have your hinges adjusted low in terms of your firewall mounted side? Thanks Jimmy


http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j54/deepnhock/Jeff%20Rice%20Studebaker%20Pictures/1937StudebakerCoupeExpressJeffRicee.jpg

DEEPNHOCK at Gmail.com
Brooklet, Georgia
'37 Coupe Express (never ending project)
'37 Coupe Express Trailer (project)
'61 Hawk (project)
http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

Jimmy Clarke
07-10-2007, 06:32 PM
Hey Jeff....I was wondering how long it would take you to "jump in". Yes, I did loosen the two bottom, front latch mount bolts in an attempt to allow the front latch to "find" it's own position, if that's what you were talking about, but it didn't help much? What I want to do is twofold: first, ensure that the back end of the hood closes fully and evenly every time I close the hood and secondly, do that in the most unintrusive way possible. Heck, if we were only concerned with the hood closing completely, a couple eary model "outside" hood safety latches off of ebay would do the job...right? Anyway, how does this sound....Imagine a hole (let's say 3/8ths inch or so that's drilled through the top of the firewall, and through the solid portion of the rear hood support. The hole would be centered exactly mid way in line with the cowl vent. You could fabricate a rod which would be spring activated in the closed position, with an "L" shaped notch lock manual handle. This type of set-up would never be seen, and would (I think?) do th job, especially if the "inside the firewall" portion was fabricated with slightly elongated, adjustment holes. Seems to me that would be the least time consuming method. I'm also toying with a lever type set up, that would do basically the same thing, but wouldn't require manual pressure to first line up the hole. (These are the type of thoughts that occupy my day, while I'm waiting for the machine shop to start on my engine. Some of my co-workers say I need to "get a life")
At the risk of veering off course here a little....what's up with the grill line up? I very carefully replaced the bottom of my grill housing, so that my grill would fit in the opening...uniformally, but for some reason the two upper fins which are screwed seperately to the top of the grill frame never seem to quite match the fin angle of the fins on the grill? Have you guys had any alignment problems in this area? ........Jimmy

Jimmy Clarke
07-10-2007, 06:32 PM
Hey Jeff....I was wondering how long it would take you to "jump in". Yes, I did loosen the two bottom, front latch mount bolts in an attempt to allow the front latch to "find" it's own position, if that's what you were talking about, but it didn't help much? What I want to do is twofold: first, ensure that the back end of the hood closes fully and evenly every time I close the hood and secondly, do that in the most unintrusive way possible. Heck, if we were only concerned with the hood closing completely, a couple eary model "outside" hood safety latches off of ebay would do the job...right? Anyway, how does this sound....Imagine a hole (let's say 3/8ths inch or so that's drilled through the top of the firewall, and through the solid portion of the rear hood support. The hole would be centered exactly mid way in line with the cowl vent. You could fabricate a rod which would be spring activated in the closed position, with an "L" shaped notch lock manual handle. This type of set-up would never be seen, and would (I think?) do th job, especially if the "inside the firewall" portion was fabricated with slightly elongated, adjustment holes. Seems to me that would be the least time consuming method. I'm also toying with a lever type set up, that would do basically the same thing, but wouldn't require manual pressure to first line up the hole. (These are the type of thoughts that occupy my day, while I'm waiting for the machine shop to start on my engine. Some of my co-workers say I need to "get a life")
At the risk of veering off course here a little....what's up with the grill line up? I very carefully replaced the bottom of my grill housing, so that my grill would fit in the opening...uniformally, but for some reason the two upper fins which are screwed seperately to the top of the grill frame never seem to quite match the fin angle of the fins on the grill? Have you guys had any alignment problems in this area? ........Jimmy

DEEPNHOCK
07-10-2007, 10:37 PM
I have a stainless piece that mounts flush to the top of the grille surround frame. The top two grille 'bars' that have screw holes in them.... Well, on mine they are glued down with Permatex Ultra Black and covered with the stainless. That way the stainless sets flush without the screw heads holding it up in the air...
But, having said that, I know the grille assembly is quite wonkity and if the bars do not match from the top two to the other 36 (?), then I'd think the center bar needs to either go up (or down) to get the bars to match.. A good whack might persuade it[}:)]
Have you ever figured out a good replacement piece for the vertical stainless bar in the center?
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by Jimmy Clarke
<snip> At the risk of veering off course here a little....what's up with the grill line up? I very carefully replaced the bottom of my grill housing, so that my grill would fit in the opening...uniformally, but for some reason the two upper fins which are screwed seperately to the top of the grill frame never seem to quite match the fin angle of the fins on the grill? Have you guys had any alignment problems in this area? ........Jimmy

DEEPNHOCK
07-10-2007, 10:37 PM
I have a stainless piece that mounts flush to the top of the grille surround frame. The top two grille 'bars' that have screw holes in them.... Well, on mine they are glued down with Permatex Ultra Black and covered with the stainless. That way the stainless sets flush without the screw heads holding it up in the air...
But, having said that, I know the grille assembly is quite wonkity and if the bars do not match from the top two to the other 36 (?), then I'd think the center bar needs to either go up (or down) to get the bars to match.. A good whack might persuade it[}:)]
Have you ever figured out a good replacement piece for the vertical stainless bar in the center?
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by Jimmy Clarke
<snip> At the risk of veering off course here a little....what's up with the grill line up? I very carefully replaced the bottom of my grill housing, so that my grill would fit in the opening...uniformally, but for some reason the two upper fins which are screwed seperately to the top of the grill frame never seem to quite match the fin angle of the fins on the grill? Have you guys had any alignment problems in this area? ........Jimmy

Jimmy Clarke
07-10-2007, 11:25 PM
Yea, I know what you mean concerning the fins. My situstion seems to be a kind of a "catch 22". The bottom of the grill frame was shot, so I rebuilt it with 16gage, making the contours match the grill stainless trim. Everything looks fine (need to post some more pictures) but the fin angles are slightly off between the hood trim, two hood frame fins, and the grill fins themselves. When I line up all the fins as best I can, the bottom of the grill insert goes back on me creating a grill insert gap, starting about 2/3rds of the way down. Some of this offset can be corrected by wedging a thick rubber bushing between the center grill insert spine, and the grill frame. I'm trying to get this stuff to fit properly before I get to the bodywork/prime stage. As far as the center grill trim...I check ebay everynight, it's just a matter of time before I spot a piece 30" long, give or take 5/8's wide, and thin enough to bend. I'll probably have to weld a stip on the actual grill center section to accomidate it. Check out yogi'sinc.com item # srs431, I think that might work for the rear hood demons. Small enough to fit indiscretely, but strong enough to hold. One on each side? ground a few rivots off on of my hood hinges tonight. took a 1/4 20 die and experimented (does this site have spell check?) with some 1/4 " bar. Took a bunch of play out, and looks pretty decent threaded at both ends topped off with a stainless acorn nut on both sides...............Jimmy

Jimmy Clarke
07-10-2007, 11:25 PM
Yea, I know what you mean concerning the fins. My situstion seems to be a kind of a "catch 22". The bottom of the grill frame was shot, so I rebuilt it with 16gage, making the contours match the grill stainless trim. Everything looks fine (need to post some more pictures) but the fin angles are slightly off between the hood trim, two hood frame fins, and the grill fins themselves. When I line up all the fins as best I can, the bottom of the grill insert goes back on me creating a grill insert gap, starting about 2/3rds of the way down. Some of this offset can be corrected by wedging a thick rubber bushing between the center grill insert spine, and the grill frame. I'm trying to get this stuff to fit properly before I get to the bodywork/prime stage. As far as the center grill trim...I check ebay everynight, it's just a matter of time before I spot a piece 30" long, give or take 5/8's wide, and thin enough to bend. I'll probably have to weld a stip on the actual grill center section to accomidate it. Check out yogi'sinc.com item # srs431, I think that might work for the rear hood demons. Small enough to fit indiscretely, but strong enough to hold. One on each side? ground a few rivots off on of my hood hinges tonight. took a 1/4 20 die and experimented (does this site have spell check?) with some 1/4 " bar. Took a bunch of play out, and looks pretty decent threaded at both ends topped off with a stainless acorn nut on both sides...............Jimmy

mycatz2fat
07-11-2007, 01:45 AM
I've run into this same problem many times with just about every old car (or truck) I've worked on. It doesn't matter what make or model either.

But I found that changing the spring angle works the best in most cases. Not only is it simple to do but if you do it right nobody will even notice the mod. All you have to do is cut another notch (or drill a hole) for the spring tang then weld up the existing one.

mycatz2fat
07-11-2007, 01:45 AM
I've run into this same problem many times with just about every old car (or truck) I've worked on. It doesn't matter what make or model either.

But I found that changing the spring angle works the best in most cases. Not only is it simple to do but if you do it right nobody will even notice the mod. All you have to do is cut another notch (or drill a hole) for the spring tang then weld up the existing one.

Jimmy Clarke
07-11-2007, 06:51 AM
Mycat......

Sounds great...but need more info? When you fabricate a new hole for the spring, are you moving the new hole left, right..., up, down in relationship to the stock hole? .....Jimmy

Jimmy Clarke
07-11-2007, 06:51 AM
Mycat......

Sounds great...but need more info? When you fabricate a new hole for the spring, are you moving the new hole left, right..., up, down in relationship to the stock hole? .....Jimmy

go-studebaker
07-11-2007, 08:19 AM
Boy these 1937's have some problems.

My car is 65 k original miles but has been fully apart, so getting it back together the way it once was is a little bit of a challenge since I was not the one that pulled it apart.

The car looks great but I see that wooffle on the top grill where it meets the hood louvres all the time. I dont know how to fix it, and only you blokes and I tend to see the problem. I dont partiularly want to hit my grill with a sledge hammer to fix it, although I was temped to several times during the restoration.

The grill is a little wobbly from memory when it is out of the car, but mounted in properly it is firm.

Regards
Greg

Greg Diffen
Australian Stude nut living in Warwick, United Kingdom

1933 St Regis Brougham Model 56 Dutch delivered
1937 Dicator sedan. Australian Body by TJ Richards
1939 Packard Seven Passenger monster UK delivered
1939 Commander Swiss Cabriolet by Lagenthal
1988 Avanti Convertible

go-studebaker
07-11-2007, 08:19 AM
Boy these 1937's have some problems.

My car is 65 k original miles but has been fully apart, so getting it back together the way it once was is a little bit of a challenge since I was not the one that pulled it apart.

The car looks great but I see that wooffle on the top grill where it meets the hood louvres all the time. I dont know how to fix it, and only you blokes and I tend to see the problem. I dont partiularly want to hit my grill with a sledge hammer to fix it, although I was temped to several times during the restoration.

The grill is a little wobbly from memory when it is out of the car, but mounted in properly it is firm.

Regards
Greg

Greg Diffen
Australian Stude nut living in Warwick, United Kingdom

1933 St Regis Brougham Model 56 Dutch delivered
1937 Dicator sedan. Australian Body by TJ Richards
1939 Packard Seven Passenger monster UK delivered
1939 Commander Swiss Cabriolet by Lagenthal
1988 Avanti Convertible

Jimmy Clarke
07-11-2007, 09:40 PM
Greg...

What do you mean by "wooffle"?.........Jimmy

Jimmy Clarke
07-11-2007, 09:40 PM
Greg...

What do you mean by "wooffle"?.........Jimmy

mycatz2fat
07-14-2007, 12:31 AM
Every hinge setup has it's own attitude Jimmy. (just like a woman) So you have to approach each one differently. (think of it as dating) You have to study the hinge and try to understand how it works. This includes the open and shut positions and the effect the hinge has on the hood. (now we're talking marriage)

See it's up to you to find the sweet spot my friend. All I can do is give you some dating tips. Myself,I take bolts (because the spring can't slip off while I test it) and tack weld them in different positions on the hinge. When I get the desired effect my next move is to concentrate on how to modify the hinge to accept the spring in that position. Then I have some fun by getting creative.

mycatz2fat
07-14-2007, 12:31 AM
Every hinge setup has it's own attitude Jimmy. (just like a woman) So you have to approach each one differently. (think of it as dating) You have to study the hinge and try to understand how it works. This includes the open and shut positions and the effect the hinge has on the hood. (now we're talking marriage)

See it's up to you to find the sweet spot my friend. All I can do is give you some dating tips. Myself,I take bolts (because the spring can't slip off while I test it) and tack weld them in different positions on the hinge. When I get the desired effect my next move is to concentrate on how to modify the hinge to accept the spring in that position. Then I have some fun by getting creative.

Jimmy Clarke
07-14-2007, 12:52 PM
Thanks Mycat,

Actually I've already spent some time "parking" with my girlfriends "the hinge sisters". I just thought you might have a general position for the new attachment (ie: top attachment point...higher and out, bottom attachment..to the rear, and down etc). One hinge is completely apart now, and I discovered that most of the wear is from the wearing of the pivot rivot itself, as opposed to the connecting side holes. What I did was to get some 1/4 inch stainless bolts, making sure there was at least enough shank to make it through the outside mounting holes before the threads started. If the smooth part of bolt was too long, I threaded some. The bolt heads were then ground/sanded round (by inserting the shank end in a drill, and pressing the 7/16th head side, at a 90deg angle into a grinder until round. They now look like chrome, round, large rivots, and most of the hinge play is gone. Will tighten with stainless self locking nuts, holding the head with a cloth covered vise grip.....Jimmy

Jimmy Clarke
07-14-2007, 12:52 PM
Thanks Mycat,

Actually I've already spent some time "parking" with my girlfriends "the hinge sisters". I just thought you might have a general position for the new attachment (ie: top attachment point...higher and out, bottom attachment..to the rear, and down etc). One hinge is completely apart now, and I discovered that most of the wear is from the wearing of the pivot rivot itself, as opposed to the connecting side holes. What I did was to get some 1/4 inch stainless bolts, making sure there was at least enough shank to make it through the outside mounting holes before the threads started. If the smooth part of bolt was too long, I threaded some. The bolt heads were then ground/sanded round (by inserting the shank end in a drill, and pressing the 7/16th head side, at a 90deg angle into a grinder until round. They now look like chrome, round, large rivots, and most of the hinge play is gone. Will tighten with stainless self locking nuts, holding the head with a cloth covered vise grip.....Jimmy

mycatz2fat
07-15-2007, 04:37 AM
Sounds to me like you and 'the hinge sisters' are working things out quite nicely. But if you want the relationship to go more smoothly try brass bushings. (I'm telling ya,those gals just love brass)

I actually use door hinge bushings and pins. The nice thing about door hinge bushings is they're splined so you don't have to worry about the bushing spinning in it's collar.

The first thing I do is make a collar and weld it on the hinge. Then I cut the bushing down and press it in. Once the bushings are installed I put the pin in and mark it about 1/4 inch past the back side. Then I drill out that 1/4 inch end so it's basically a thin walled tube. I add just enough heat and use a pipe flanging tool to work that pin just like a rivet.

Once I get the pressure just right I weld the hole up. Then I file the head flat and round. (to match the head of the pin) It looks stock but works 10 times smoother.

mycatz2fat
07-15-2007, 04:37 AM
Sounds to me like you and 'the hinge sisters' are working things out quite nicely. But if you want the relationship to go more smoothly try brass bushings. (I'm telling ya,those gals just love brass)

I actually use door hinge bushings and pins. The nice thing about door hinge bushings is they're splined so you don't have to worry about the bushing spinning in it's collar.

The first thing I do is make a collar and weld it on the hinge. Then I cut the bushing down and press it in. Once the bushings are installed I put the pin in and mark it about 1/4 inch past the back side. Then I drill out that 1/4 inch end so it's basically a thin walled tube. I add just enough heat and use a pipe flanging tool to work that pin just like a rivet.

Once I get the pressure just right I weld the hole up. Then I file the head flat and round. (to match the head of the pin) It looks stock but works 10 times smoother.

Jimmy Clarke
07-15-2007, 10:58 AM
Mycat....great info you have there. Back to the hood not closing in the rear.....I'm thinking about the operation of the hinge being not unlike a pair of vise grips. You have to apply a considerible amount of pressure at first, but at some point that same pressure is used to keep the grips from opening. During the closed position of the hood the springs have the most tension on them (it seems anyway) I'm thinking that same pressure is used to keep the hood closed once the fulcrom point is shifted?.....jimmy

Jimmy Clarke
07-15-2007, 10:58 AM
Mycat....great info you have there. Back to the hood not closing in the rear.....I'm thinking about the operation of the hinge being not unlike a pair of vise grips. You have to apply a considerible amount of pressure at first, but at some point that same pressure is used to keep the grips from opening. During the closed position of the hood the springs have the most tension on them (it seems anyway) I'm thinking that same pressure is used to keep the hood closed once the fulcrom point is shifted?.....jimmy