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View Full Version : From the archives #93 (1941 Studebaker Champion - 3rd anniversary)



Studebaker Wheel
04-02-2012, 03:02 AM
http://i230.photobucket.com/albums/ee285/studeq/newsgroup/birthdaycarforum.jpg?t=1333353433

The final line stopped briefly on April 10, 1941 to commemorate the 3rd anniversary of the Champion. Studebaker executives noted in the image include Richard Hutchinson, Harold Vance, Kenneth Elliott, Paul G. Hoffman.

HAWK64
04-02-2012, 06:16 AM
How many candles on the cake?

BobPalma
04-02-2012, 07:39 AM
Other old pictures you have like that, Dick: Were the whitewalls always that dirty? 'Seems commonplace on those older cars (what few were manufactured with whitewalls), that they appear dirty in end-of-production-line photos, when you'd think they would be reasonably clean...or at least the white surface not downright filthy, as that LF appears to be. BP

Studebaker Wheel
04-02-2012, 12:18 PM
Other old pictures you have like that, Dick: Were the whitewalls always that dirty? 'Seems commonplace on those older cars (what few were manufactured with whitewalls), that they appear dirty in end-of-production-line photos, when you'd think they would be reasonably clean...or at least the white surface not downright filthy, as that LF appears to be. BP

Interesting observation Bob. Yes I have also noticed that. I have several photos from that era that show the dirty white walls. Apparently that was a task left to the dealer. I am sure Palma Motors had a "dealer preparation charge?" Tasks of that nature would probably have been left to the owners son....if he had any initiative?

aarrggh
04-02-2012, 12:22 PM
Must have run out of side view mirrors that day .

41 Frank
04-02-2012, 12:26 PM
Could it be that the wheels during vehicle assembly were running in a through, ala drive through car wash, scuffing up the whitewalls.

studegary
04-02-2012, 02:20 PM
Other old pictures you have like that, Dick: Were the whitewalls always that dirty? 'Seems commonplace on those older cars (what few were manufactured with whitewalls), that they appear dirty in end-of-production-line photos, when you'd think they would be reasonably clean...or at least the white surface not downright filthy, as that LF appears to be. BP

At least in the 1950s, new wide whitewalls came with a protective coating on the white part of the tire.

BobPalma
04-02-2012, 03:09 PM
Interesting observation Bob. Yes I have also noticed that. I have several photos from that era that show the dirty white walls. Apparently that was a task left to the dealer. I am sure Palma Motors had a "dealer preparation charge?" Tasks of that nature would probably have been left to the owners son....if he had any initiative?

That he would, Dick.

Two favorite scents from dealership days are constant: Westley's Bleche-White and Sparkle Glass Cleaner. Both distinctive, although Westley's is not to be taken in strong doses. AFAIK, those products still have those same distinctive odors, and Westley's still slightly misspells bleach. BP

BobPalma
04-02-2012, 03:10 PM
At least in the 1950s, new wide whitewalls came with a protective coating on the white part of the tire.

'Well into the 70s, Gary, too...at least when I was mounting tires in different Shell stations where I worked as late as circa 1973. BP

kmac530
04-02-2012, 03:23 PM
The WWW I just bought for my truck has a blue coating that washed off with soap and water, then they were also fully wrapped, old school style.
I have found with Harley WWW tires that the Mr. Clean Magic Eraser works wonders on WW tires.

Chris_Dresbach
04-02-2012, 04:37 PM
I think it's interesting that there's a speed limit sign posted inside the factory. Probably for the drive off I'd assume.

starliner62
04-02-2012, 05:07 PM
41 Studes sure are pretty to me. I'll have one someday. There is a rough one right down the street from me but it probably can't be bought.