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JDP
06-13-2007, 10:15 AM
In all candor, I agree with most of his comments, early Avanti's are not a great choice for a daily driver.


http://www.slate.com/id/2167797/

JDP/Maryland

64 Daytona HT/R2 clone
63 GT R2
63 Lark 2 door
62 Lark 2 door
60 Lark HT-60Hawk
59 3E truck
58 Starlight
52 & 53 Starliner
51 Commander

Chris Pile
06-13-2007, 10:17 AM
I say the guys a whiner, John.

He's probably young and totally indoctrinated by the Nor-Cal mindset.

Chris Pile
The Studebaker Special
Midway Chapter SDC

Chris Pile
06-13-2007, 10:17 AM
I say the guys a whiner, John.

He's probably young and totally indoctrinated by the Nor-Cal mindset.

Chris Pile
The Studebaker Special
Midway Chapter SDC

skyway
06-13-2007, 11:55 AM
No experience with that "Nor-Cal mindset", but I do know the sound of a whine when I hear it.

skyway
06-13-2007, 11:55 AM
No experience with that "Nor-Cal mindset", but I do know the sound of a whine when I hear it.

vegas paul
06-13-2007, 12:01 PM
The first tip-off that this guy is not an appropriate Stude owner, is when he said "My mechanic cobbled together a modern brake upgrade..." Stude owners have mechanics? Maybe its the same guy who fixes his cappucino machine when it goes on the blink!

Las Vegas, NV
'51 Champion Business Coupe G899965 10G-Q4-1434
http://i151.photobucket.com/albums/s144/vegas_paul/1462673_2_350.jpg?t=1180041622 http://i151.photobucket.com/albums/s144/vegas_paul/graciestude.jpg?t=1180041703

vegas paul
06-13-2007, 12:01 PM
The first tip-off that this guy is not an appropriate Stude owner, is when he said "My mechanic cobbled together a modern brake upgrade..." Stude owners have mechanics? Maybe its the same guy who fixes his cappucino machine when it goes on the blink!

Las Vegas, NV
'51 Champion Business Coupe G899965 10G-Q4-1434
http://i151.photobucket.com/albums/s144/vegas_paul/1462673_2_350.jpg?t=1180041622 http://i151.photobucket.com/albums/s144/vegas_paul/graciestude.jpg?t=1180041703

lstude
06-13-2007, 12:17 PM
I agree with some of his comments. Carburetors are always trouble compared to today’s FI., but I have very little trouble with my 64 Studebaker convertible. Of course it is 43 years old and it does need a lot of work.

I WILL HAVE TO SAY IN ALL MY YEARS DRIVING STUDEBAKERS, I NEVER HAD TROUBLE WITH THEM STARTING WHEN THEY WERE COLD, now when they are hot...

This guy does not have the correct mindset to use an old car as a daily driver. You have to love 'em and put up with their problems, mostly due to their age. He should go back to his Honda.

Leonard Shepherd
http://leonardshepherd.com/

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/lstude1/Mein64DaytonaatBradfieldssm2.jpghttp://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/lstude1/AlmostreadyforSB6-4.jpg

lstude
06-13-2007, 12:17 PM
I agree with some of his comments. Carburetors are always trouble compared to today’s FI., but I have very little trouble with my 64 Studebaker convertible. Of course it is 43 years old and it does need a lot of work.

I WILL HAVE TO SAY IN ALL MY YEARS DRIVING STUDEBAKERS, I NEVER HAD TROUBLE WITH THEM STARTING WHEN THEY WERE COLD, now when they are hot...

This guy does not have the correct mindset to use an old car as a daily driver. You have to love 'em and put up with their problems, mostly due to their age. He should go back to his Honda.

Leonard Shepherd
http://leonardshepherd.com/

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/lstude1/Mein64DaytonaatBradfieldssm2.jpghttp://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p235/lstude1/AlmostreadyforSB6-4.jpg

bonehead007
06-13-2007, 12:45 PM
Lets see, I've just gotton my Avanti engine back togetehr and after sitting a year and a half it started right up with the gas I left in. I just had to send my wifes Toyota to a mechanic because the check engine light stayed on and I couldn't pinpoint the exact pollution control that went bad. Cost, $545.00.........

At least the Avanti's troubles can be mostly solved by novices, like myself...Plus wasn't the Avanti meant to be more of a sports car, to compete with a Corvette ??? You can't please these yuppies...

bonehead007
06-13-2007, 12:45 PM
Lets see, I've just gotton my Avanti engine back togetehr and after sitting a year and a half it started right up with the gas I left in. I just had to send my wifes Toyota to a mechanic because the check engine light stayed on and I couldn't pinpoint the exact pollution control that went bad. Cost, $545.00.........

At least the Avanti's troubles can be mostly solved by novices, like myself...Plus wasn't the Avanti meant to be more of a sports car, to compete with a Corvette ??? You can't please these yuppies...

bams50
06-13-2007, 01:40 PM
Sadly, the author's mostly right on... we romanticize these old cars that we love so much, but the reality is they are old cars. The upside is the style, memories, and simplicity of them; downside shows the almost constant need to tune, nurse, babysit, and repair them! Low-tech is simple to understand- at the cost of lesser reliability. I saw a car on eBay for sale this week in which the very honest- and accurate- seller stated, "I bought this car last year because I've always wanted one, not understanding how much care a classic car really needs; so it's time for it to go to someone who has the knowledge, ability, and desire to maintain it like the great classic it is." What a profound statement- I almost bid on the car just because of the seller's honesty! Didn't complain, didn't run the car down- in fact showed how much he loves and respects the car, and his honesty about who he is in relation to the hobby[^]

My 65 Lincoln convertible is one of my dream cars; 35k actual mile, never rusted, always treated like a diva. When I bought it I had dreams of driving it over the winding 2-lane 12-28 road to Lake George with my family, just like we did when I was a kid- in 60s Lincolns (about a 3 1/2 hour trip)... but the reality is, after 3 years I still haven't done so, as I haven't gotten the nerve to risk a vacation on a breakdown of a 42 year old car...[B)]

I've always been aware of this reality; doesn't temper my love for these rolling sculptures we call old cars one bit! But I'll be towing my 47 year old Stude the 600 miles to SB behind my plush, modern, air-conditioned conversion van...[8D]

To those driving a Stude long-distance to SB- good luck, God bless, and I'll pray for your problem-free trip...;)

Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

bams50
06-13-2007, 01:40 PM
Sadly, the author's mostly right on... we romanticize these old cars that we love so much, but the reality is they are old cars. The upside is the style, memories, and simplicity of them; downside shows the almost constant need to tune, nurse, babysit, and repair them! Low-tech is simple to understand- at the cost of lesser reliability. I saw a car on eBay for sale this week in which the very honest- and accurate- seller stated, "I bought this car last year because I've always wanted one, not understanding how much care a classic car really needs; so it's time for it to go to someone who has the knowledge, ability, and desire to maintain it like the great classic it is." What a profound statement- I almost bid on the car just because of the seller's honesty! Didn't complain, didn't run the car down- in fact showed how much he loves and respects the car, and his honesty about who he is in relation to the hobby[^]

My 65 Lincoln convertible is one of my dream cars; 35k actual mile, never rusted, always treated like a diva. When I bought it I had dreams of driving it over the winding 2-lane 12-28 road to Lake George with my family, just like we did when I was a kid- in 60s Lincolns (about a 3 1/2 hour trip)... but the reality is, after 3 years I still haven't done so, as I haven't gotten the nerve to risk a vacation on a breakdown of a 42 year old car...[B)]

I've always been aware of this reality; doesn't temper my love for these rolling sculptures we call old cars one bit! But I'll be towing my 47 year old Stude the 600 miles to SB behind my plush, modern, air-conditioned conversion van...[8D]

To those driving a Stude long-distance to SB- good luck, God bless, and I'll pray for your problem-free trip...;)

Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

bams50
06-13-2007, 01:59 PM
quote:Originally posted by vegas paul

The first tip-off that this guy is not an appropriate Stude owner, is when he said "My mechanic cobbled together a modern brake upgrade..." Stude owners have mechanics?

So if one hires out any repairs on a Stude, he doesn't deserve to own it? I bet upon reflection you don't really think that way...[:I]
I didn't care for the use of the word, "cobbled", but chalked that up to poetic license; but the immediately preceding part of that sentence was right on- "we decided classic cool only goes so far"[^] That's why I converted my 65 Lincoln to dual M/C, and any single-pot old car I have will be converted- I like to do modern upgrades that don't detract from the essence and character of the car.

Interesting discussion- I'm enjoying reading everyone's views on this![^]



Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

bams50
06-13-2007, 01:59 PM
quote:Originally posted by vegas paul

The first tip-off that this guy is not an appropriate Stude owner, is when he said "My mechanic cobbled together a modern brake upgrade..." Stude owners have mechanics?

So if one hires out any repairs on a Stude, he doesn't deserve to own it? I bet upon reflection you don't really think that way...[:I]
I didn't care for the use of the word, "cobbled", but chalked that up to poetic license; but the immediately preceding part of that sentence was right on- "we decided classic cool only goes so far"[^] That's why I converted my 65 Lincoln to dual M/C, and any single-pot old car I have will be converted- I like to do modern upgrades that don't detract from the essence and character of the car.

Interesting discussion- I'm enjoying reading everyone's views on this![^]



Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

JDP
06-13-2007, 01:59 PM
Robert, you said it better then I ever could of. I love to drive my Studebakers on occasion for pleasure, but every time I do, I recall all the times something broke and left me on the side of the road. My wife quit driving my Studebakers after a heater core let go on a Avanti, and that was after another Studebaker dropped a tailpipe. I think the guy did praise the pluses of the Avanti, but did point out the downside. Anyone that has driven a Avanti in 90 degree weather, or in the rain would notice the contrast to a modern car. For me, part of it is simply being spoiled. If I'm given the choice between driving a Studebaker and my LHS, I'll often chose the AC, cruise, and XM radio over the thrill of showing off my old car. I'm at the point in my life that I need at least one modern brand X as a daily driver, and a few Studebakers for occasional pleasure driving

JDP/Maryland

64 Daytona HT/R2 clone
63 GT R2
63 Lark 2 door
62 Lark 2 door
60 Lark HT-60Hawk
59 3E truck
58 Starlight
52 & 53 Starliner
51 Commander

JDP
06-13-2007, 01:59 PM
Robert, you said it better then I ever could of. I love to drive my Studebakers on occasion for pleasure, but every time I do, I recall all the times something broke and left me on the side of the road. My wife quit driving my Studebakers after a heater core let go on a Avanti, and that was after another Studebaker dropped a tailpipe. I think the guy did praise the pluses of the Avanti, but did point out the downside. Anyone that has driven a Avanti in 90 degree weather, or in the rain would notice the contrast to a modern car. For me, part of it is simply being spoiled. If I'm given the choice between driving a Studebaker and my LHS, I'll often chose the AC, cruise, and XM radio over the thrill of showing off my old car. I'm at the point in my life that I need at least one modern brand X as a daily driver, and a few Studebakers for occasional pleasure driving

JDP/Maryland

64 Daytona HT/R2 clone
63 GT R2
63 Lark 2 door
62 Lark 2 door
60 Lark HT-60Hawk
59 3E truck
58 Starlight
52 & 53 Starliner
51 Commander

vegas paul
06-13-2007, 02:04 PM
Robert - Sorry, I didn't mean that mechanics weren't used by "real" Stude owners, but I got the impression from the entire tone of the article that this owner felt "entitled" to a trouble free classic car, and his mechanic was responsible for supplying that trouble-free performance. I guess my anti-California, left-coast elitist bias was showing! My aplogies to the left-leaning Stude owners!

Las Vegas, NV
'51 Champion Business Coupe G899965 10G-Q4-1434
http://i151.photobucket.com/albums/s144/vegas_paul/1462673_2_350.jpg?t=1180041622 http://i151.photobucket.com/albums/s144/vegas_paul/graciestude.jpg?t=1180041703

vegas paul
06-13-2007, 02:04 PM
Robert - Sorry, I didn't mean that mechanics weren't used by "real" Stude owners, but I got the impression from the entire tone of the article that this owner felt "entitled" to a trouble free classic car, and his mechanic was responsible for supplying that trouble-free performance. I guess my anti-California, left-coast elitist bias was showing! My aplogies to the left-leaning Stude owners!

Las Vegas, NV
'51 Champion Business Coupe G899965 10G-Q4-1434
http://i151.photobucket.com/albums/s144/vegas_paul/1462673_2_350.jpg?t=1180041622 http://i151.photobucket.com/albums/s144/vegas_paul/graciestude.jpg?t=1180041703

bams50
06-13-2007, 02:08 PM
Careful now, Paul- I may be from NY, but NOT NYC... I'm definitely not left leaning- just my state!:D

Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

bams50
06-13-2007, 02:08 PM
Careful now, Paul- I may be from NY, but NOT NYC... I'm definitely not left leaning- just my state!:D

Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

vegas paul
06-13-2007, 02:12 PM
I am definately not left-leaning, and I can prove it - My driver's side rear leaf spring shackle is almost an inch longer than my passenger side! (Stock and correct) This gives me a definite right tilt. I guess this was to compensate for overweight businessmen driving those Business Coupes.

Las Vegas, NV
'51 Champion Business Coupe G899965 10G-Q4-1434
http://i151.photobucket.com/albums/s144/vegas_paul/1462673_2_350.jpg?t=1180041622 http://i151.photobucket.com/albums/s144/vegas_paul/graciestude.jpg?t=1180041703

vegas paul
06-13-2007, 02:12 PM
I am definately not left-leaning, and I can prove it - My driver's side rear leaf spring shackle is almost an inch longer than my passenger side! (Stock and correct) This gives me a definite right tilt. I guess this was to compensate for overweight businessmen driving those Business Coupes.

Las Vegas, NV
'51 Champion Business Coupe G899965 10G-Q4-1434
http://i151.photobucket.com/albums/s144/vegas_paul/1462673_2_350.jpg?t=1180041622 http://i151.photobucket.com/albums/s144/vegas_paul/graciestude.jpg?t=1180041703

monomaniac
06-13-2007, 02:33 PM
This author should stick to writing about things with which he is familiar (or at least knows a little about).
Some of these magazines are always short of filler pieces and it's unbelievable what they print.

monomaniac
06-13-2007, 02:33 PM
This author should stick to writing about things with which he is familiar (or at least knows a little about).
Some of these magazines are always short of filler pieces and it's unbelievable what they print.

mbstude
06-13-2007, 03:10 PM
Well, I suppose I'm living in the wrong world...

My ONLY way of going (short of getting a ride with someone else) is my '59 Stude pickup.[^] No airbags, seat belts(ride with me at your own risk!), power anything, or any modern comfort for that matter. I did add a passenger side armrest, so that's some improvement. [:o)]
I agree with some of what the writer of the article wrote, though I disagree with some of it too.
My truck's carburator choke isn't hooked up, and in the mornings it's a little slow on getting warmed up. In the winter it's even worse. But, it has always managed to crank and run fine.
The road noise is quite excessive. There's hardly any, if any at all, insulation in the cab. When heading down the highway with the truck topped out at 68 MPH, you can barely have a conversation because the truck is so loud going down the road. I've thought about adding a radio of some sort, but you wouldn't be able to hear it.
It has been an extremely reliable way of going. Maybe I'm lucky. I've put about 6,000 miles on it since I got it in August, '06. I've driven it on a few 200+ mile trips with NO problems, other than it wanting to get a little warm once.
The only problems I've had with it since I got it are: The points went out when I was pulling in the driveway, had new parts on the shelf to fix; the gas line got clogged on the way to school, could happen to any car; the carb was idled too low when I got it, a quick turn of a screwdriver and that was fixed. Most anything that needs doing to it, a 17 year old kid can do it. ;)
Yes, these old rolling artworks do require some maintence to keep on going, but once you get it right, it's gonna stay that way if you treat it with care.
I was actually considering driving the truck the 1000 miles or so each way to South Bend, but the Dodge Ram is a lot more comfortable, so we're pulling the '59 on the trailer. I know the '59 would make it, but AC is nice. :D

Even though my truck is FAR from a new Cadillac, I wouldn't have it any other way. To me, owning and driving the '59 is not a hobby, just a way of life.

So WHAT if there's a few rattles, no airbags, anti-lock brakes, leather-wrapped steering wheel, or heated seats? I seem to manage fine without it. It's all part of it, and my truck is WAY cooler than some new Honda econobox thing. How many people will double-take when they see some new Ford or Chevy heading down the road? Not many. How about when they see a bright orange Studebaker? Most all of them.

The writer goes on and on about how improved a new car is over an old one. I agree with him for the most part. But, keep in mind, my '59 has been around for 48 years now, and is still on the road everyday. I wonder how many 2007 Mazdas will be on the road in 48 years...

It's all part of the fun, and I wouldn't trade it for anything. :)

Keep on truckin', in a Studebaker truck.

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j209/mbstude/car_rally005.jpg

Matthew Burnette
'59 Scotsman
'63 Daytona
Drivin' my Stude Daily; in Hazlehurst, GA

mbstude
06-13-2007, 03:10 PM
Well, I suppose I'm living in the wrong world...

My ONLY way of going (short of getting a ride with someone else) is my '59 Stude pickup.[^] No airbags, seat belts(ride with me at your own risk!), power anything, or any modern comfort for that matter. I did add a passenger side armrest, so that's some improvement. [:o)]
I agree with some of what the writer of the article wrote, though I disagree with some of it too.
My truck's carburator choke isn't hooked up, and in the mornings it's a little slow on getting warmed up. In the winter it's even worse. But, it has always managed to crank and run fine.
The road noise is quite excessive. There's hardly any, if any at all, insulation in the cab. When heading down the highway with the truck topped out at 68 MPH, you can barely have a conversation because the truck is so loud going down the road. I've thought about adding a radio of some sort, but you wouldn't be able to hear it.
It has been an extremely reliable way of going. Maybe I'm lucky. I've put about 6,000 miles on it since I got it in August, '06. I've driven it on a few 200+ mile trips with NO problems, other than it wanting to get a little warm once.
The only problems I've had with it since I got it are: The points went out when I was pulling in the driveway, had new parts on the shelf to fix; the gas line got clogged on the way to school, could happen to any car; the carb was idled too low when I got it, a quick turn of a screwdriver and that was fixed. Most anything that needs doing to it, a 17 year old kid can do it. ;)
Yes, these old rolling artworks do require some maintence to keep on going, but once you get it right, it's gonna stay that way if you treat it with care.
I was actually considering driving the truck the 1000 miles or so each way to South Bend, but the Dodge Ram is a lot more comfortable, so we're pulling the '59 on the trailer. I know the '59 would make it, but AC is nice. :D

Even though my truck is FAR from a new Cadillac, I wouldn't have it any other way. To me, owning and driving the '59 is not a hobby, just a way of life.

So WHAT if there's a few rattles, no airbags, anti-lock brakes, leather-wrapped steering wheel, or heated seats? I seem to manage fine without it. It's all part of it, and my truck is WAY cooler than some new Honda econobox thing. How many people will double-take when they see some new Ford or Chevy heading down the road? Not many. How about when they see a bright orange Studebaker? Most all of them.

The writer goes on and on about how improved a new car is over an old one. I agree with him for the most part. But, keep in mind, my '59 has been around for 48 years now, and is still on the road everyday. I wonder how many 2007 Mazdas will be on the road in 48 years...

It's all part of the fun, and I wouldn't trade it for anything. :)

Keep on truckin', in a Studebaker truck.

http://i81.photobucket.com/albums/j209/mbstude/car_rally005.jpg

Matthew Burnette
'59 Scotsman
'63 Daytona
Drivin' my Stude Daily; in Hazlehurst, GA

bams50
06-13-2007, 03:38 PM
quote:Originally posted by monomaniac

This author should stick to writing about things with which he is familiar (or at least knows a little about).
Some of these magazines are always short of filler pieces and it's unbelievable what they print.


I respectfully ask, what did the writer say that was so wrong? I felt his assessment of the car and his experience with it had the ring of truth. Truly does seem to be familiar with his car, for better or worse...

He didn't say he hated it; in fact he did list a lot of pluses about it. At the end when he told someone to be glad they don't make them like that anymore, I felt it was more a nod to the reliability of modern technology, not to impugn the car...

Hopefully those that read the article will appreciate the enjoyment a classic car can give, while gaining a little insight into the realities of actually owning one;)

Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

bams50
06-13-2007, 03:38 PM
quote:Originally posted by monomaniac

This author should stick to writing about things with which he is familiar (or at least knows a little about).
Some of these magazines are always short of filler pieces and it's unbelievable what they print.


I respectfully ask, what did the writer say that was so wrong? I felt his assessment of the car and his experience with it had the ring of truth. Truly does seem to be familiar with his car, for better or worse...

He didn't say he hated it; in fact he did list a lot of pluses about it. At the end when he told someone to be glad they don't make them like that anymore, I felt it was more a nod to the reliability of modern technology, not to impugn the car...

Hopefully those that read the article will appreciate the enjoyment a classic car can give, while gaining a little insight into the realities of actually owning one;)

Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

JBOYLE
06-13-2007, 03:44 PM
I sound a bit like thew author...someone who pays to have most stuff fixed, and a guy who likes Avantis.

But unlike this guy I'm smart/mature enough to know that a 1963-4 car isn't going to be a picnic to drive every day. In other words, I know...and accept...its limitations.

That's why I have a shelf full of S-I, SASCO, Etc. parts catalogs, Turning Wheels,Avanti magazines as well as shop & parts manuals...and none for my other cars.

Up until a couple of years ago my daily driver was a 77 Jeep CJ-5.
Noisy (what radio?), stiff, hot (no AC..just take the doors off), thirsty (worse than my V-10 Excursion..even though it has 3 more seats, auto, air, etc), but I drove it because it was fun (and because when I was in the USAF, I thought driving my Mercedes would have been a bit excessive to the young enlisted people who worked for me).

The Avanti, is stylish and fun in its own way...but it will never be as practical, safe, comfortable or reliable as my [u]other, newer</u> luxury sport coupe. If you want something with no headaches..buy an Acura, Mercedes, or Lexus (pity no US firm makes a quality coupe anymore).

If the writer isn't smart enough to know the difference between a 63 Studebaker and a 21st century car, he really out to shut the heck up and buy a Corolla.




63 Avanti R1 2788
1914 Stutz Bearcat
(George Barris replica)

Washington State

JBOYLE
06-13-2007, 03:44 PM
I sound a bit like thew author...someone who pays to have most stuff fixed, and a guy who likes Avantis.

But unlike this guy I'm smart/mature enough to know that a 1963-4 car isn't going to be a picnic to drive every day. In other words, I know...and accept...its limitations.

That's why I have a shelf full of S-I, SASCO, Etc. parts catalogs, Turning Wheels,Avanti magazines as well as shop & parts manuals...and none for my other cars.

Up until a couple of years ago my daily driver was a 77 Jeep CJ-5.
Noisy (what radio?), stiff, hot (no AC..just take the doors off), thirsty (worse than my V-10 Excursion..even though it has 3 more seats, auto, air, etc), but I drove it because it was fun (and because when I was in the USAF, I thought driving my Mercedes would have been a bit excessive to the young enlisted people who worked for me).

The Avanti, is stylish and fun in its own way...but it will never be as practical, safe, comfortable or reliable as my [u]other, newer</u> luxury sport coupe. If you want something with no headaches..buy an Acura, Mercedes, or Lexus (pity no US firm makes a quality coupe anymore).

If the writer isn't smart enough to know the difference between a 63 Studebaker and a 21st century car, he really out to shut the heck up and buy a Corolla.




63 Avanti R1 2788
1914 Stutz Bearcat
(George Barris replica)

Washington State

Karl
06-13-2007, 10:44 PM
A whiner. You can find fault with any old car.This guy just happens to have a Avanti.If you own and old car. You learn to accept the problems.Old cars each have there own little or big issues.But they have a certain glamour to.Using and Avanti as a every day car, sure. Been ther done that.Dad used to commute from Portland to Seattle once or twice a week.I drove for a few of years every day. Now I take turns with them.If you want Quite,Smooth riding, a/c and Good mileage. Buy a Hybrid .
Been in a Studebaker sense day one. So I am kind Of bias.:)
http://i117.photobucket.com/albums/o50/twnchgr/1954DadandKarl.jpg
Like Matthew said , Its all part of the fun. WOULDN'T TRADE IT FOR ANYTHING.:D
Ok I'm off my soap box now.

63 Twin Supercharged Avanti
64 Avanti R3w/NOS
88LSC Avanti 350 Supercharged w/NOS

Karl
06-13-2007, 10:44 PM
A whiner. You can find fault with any old car.This guy just happens to have a Avanti.If you own and old car. You learn to accept the problems.Old cars each have there own little or big issues.But they have a certain glamour to.Using and Avanti as a every day car, sure. Been ther done that.Dad used to commute from Portland to Seattle once or twice a week.I drove for a few of years every day. Now I take turns with them.If you want Quite,Smooth riding, a/c and Good mileage. Buy a Hybrid .
Been in a Studebaker sense day one. So I am kind Of bias.:)
http://i117.photobucket.com/albums/o50/twnchgr/1954DadandKarl.jpg
Like Matthew said , Its all part of the fun. WOULDN'T TRADE IT FOR ANYTHING.:D
Ok I'm off my soap box now.

63 Twin Supercharged Avanti
64 Avanti R3w/NOS
88LSC Avanti 350 Supercharged w/NOS

PlainBrownR2
06-14-2007, 01:04 AM
Whiner.......
Considering I have about the same engine where do I begin. I can turn a wrench as well as adapt newer technology to older equipment. I have an electric fuel pump which negates the uphill business. Considering I'm from the midwest I dunno if I could find hills as steep as San Fransisco anyhow (hilly but not obnoxiously hilly). I can spot most fuel problems, as well as I know not to stick my fingers in spinning things when they're moving. I dunno why he was doing or griping about that anyways, unless he's really that.....but I digress. The Avanti's had rollbars, seat belts, and a padded dash, and he should not even have brought in the supercomputer crash studies into it as that wouldnt come along for another 15-20 years or so.
He cant seem to maintain a braking system(eyeball the fluid once in while, you know). His mechanic cobbled his brakes together which is nothing short of dangerous. Yeah my Lark has wind noise too, I like a little noise. That way I know whether something is ready to fall off or not. He is assuming alot. My power steering system hasnt lost a drop for a coupla years or more. I don't even wanna get into those chrome bumpers and his plastic fantastic in an accident :(. He drives a Honda Civic, a FWD 120 HP Civic and he claims he's ontop of the world. I'd love an Avanti like that. I'm thinking a pair of turbos and Megasquirt, and some other enhancements to improve the car(just for maintenance sake on an already spectacular car). Here's where I really get on my soap box though. Improve the car, take to a nearby dragstrip with an idea to race his Civic. Give him a run or two and then poke my head out the window and shout, "How's that Civic working for you now??".
Sure, the maintenance on the Lark is trivial stuff. Lose a light here, find that rattle there. But there has very few times the car has left me crippled. I cant insult the reliability of his Civic, but when something enginewise happens, it will be like the pingpong ball and the mousetrap demonstration. Only a couple I can think of is when the 35 amp Alt went for the first time, and that could have been fixed with a quick recharge from the school (I was on my way to school at the time and towed it in on a flatbed). The other was when that pump-crank-alternator belt let loose, and that could be fixed with a spare. Now I have a spare car, a Crown Victoria. It has this little habit of turning its Check Engine light on, even when all is well from its gauges. His Civic probably has the same thing. It could mean anything from a short in the light circuit to the block is ready to blow. It also means take it to a dealership, plug 'er in, and see what code it throws. I don't like things that finicky, either its broke or its not. Considering I like to do my wrenching and the design is unlike any other, too bad they dont make them like that anymore. Finally, if wanted to do some decent writing, words like s*cked, and dumb do not make his case very appealing or convincing. Also, I look forward to the 100(I think its in that ballpark) mile trip to SB next week in this Lark, this car I have loved since '99 driving it daily from high school and now to college, the one that has survived 2 other vehicles with the modern conveyances he so parades.
I'll get off my soapbox and go continue assembling the kick panels for the Lark, lol. As of now, its trying at times, but I wouldnt have it any other way. :)


1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
1950 Studebaker 2R5 with 170 turbocharged
[img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00003.jpg?t=1171152673[/img=left]
[img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00009.jpg?t=1171153019[/img=right]
[img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00002.jpg?t=1171153180[/img=left]
[img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00005.jpg?t=1171153370[/img=right]

PlainBrownR2
06-14-2007, 01:04 AM
Whiner.......
Considering I have about the same engine where do I begin. I can turn a wrench as well as adapt newer technology to older equipment. I have an electric fuel pump which negates the uphill business. Considering I'm from the midwest I dunno if I could find hills as steep as San Fransisco anyhow (hilly but not obnoxiously hilly). I can spot most fuel problems, as well as I know not to stick my fingers in spinning things when they're moving. I dunno why he was doing or griping about that anyways, unless he's really that.....but I digress. The Avanti's had rollbars, seat belts, and a padded dash, and he should not even have brought in the supercomputer crash studies into it as that wouldnt come along for another 15-20 years or so.
He cant seem to maintain a braking system(eyeball the fluid once in while, you know). His mechanic cobbled his brakes together which is nothing short of dangerous. Yeah my Lark has wind noise too, I like a little noise. That way I know whether something is ready to fall off or not. He is assuming alot. My power steering system hasnt lost a drop for a coupla years or more. I don't even wanna get into those chrome bumpers and his plastic fantastic in an accident :(. He drives a Honda Civic, a FWD 120 HP Civic and he claims he's ontop of the world. I'd love an Avanti like that. I'm thinking a pair of turbos and Megasquirt, and some other enhancements to improve the car(just for maintenance sake on an already spectacular car). Here's where I really get on my soap box though. Improve the car, take to a nearby dragstrip with an idea to race his Civic. Give him a run or two and then poke my head out the window and shout, "How's that Civic working for you now??".
Sure, the maintenance on the Lark is trivial stuff. Lose a light here, find that rattle there. But there has very few times the car has left me crippled. I cant insult the reliability of his Civic, but when something enginewise happens, it will be like the pingpong ball and the mousetrap demonstration. Only a couple I can think of is when the 35 amp Alt went for the first time, and that could have been fixed with a quick recharge from the school (I was on my way to school at the time and towed it in on a flatbed). The other was when that pump-crank-alternator belt let loose, and that could be fixed with a spare. Now I have a spare car, a Crown Victoria. It has this little habit of turning its Check Engine light on, even when all is well from its gauges. His Civic probably has the same thing. It could mean anything from a short in the light circuit to the block is ready to blow. It also means take it to a dealership, plug 'er in, and see what code it throws. I don't like things that finicky, either its broke or its not. Considering I like to do my wrenching and the design is unlike any other, too bad they dont make them like that anymore. Finally, if wanted to do some decent writing, words like s*cked, and dumb do not make his case very appealing or convincing. Also, I look forward to the 100(I think its in that ballpark) mile trip to SB next week in this Lark, this car I have loved since '99 driving it daily from high school and now to college, the one that has survived 2 other vehicles with the modern conveyances he so parades.
I'll get off my soapbox and go continue assembling the kick panels for the Lark, lol. As of now, its trying at times, but I wouldnt have it any other way. :)


1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
1950 Studebaker 2R5 with 170 turbocharged
[img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00003.jpg?t=1171152673[/img=left]
[img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00009.jpg?t=1171153019[/img=right]
[img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00002.jpg?t=1171153180[/img=left]
[img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00005.jpg?t=1171153370[/img=right]

bams50
06-14-2007, 04:55 AM
As I said, romanticizing... and that's fine. So long as inexperienced folks get an idea of what they're getting into. Reminds me of when folks think it's a great idea to buy bunnies for little ones for Easter; sure are cute- till you find out they bite, and you clean their cage a few times... then the poor rabbit's killed, or ditched in the wild, or pawned off on someone who may or may not be willing/able to care for it properly...

Every one of us knows someone, or have seen a situation somewhere, where a car is torn apart for restoration and just stopped, or a restored car that needs redoing because it was neglected, or abandoned in the back lot. If you haven't, just go to eBay; you'll always find cars that say something like, "Had planned to restore but lost interest"...

We can say the writer's a whiner if we want; but the fact is, he's given some insight into the reality of old cars! I'd rather see that article than one that tells folks new to the hobby that everything's going to be great, and you're going to be able to jump into that 50 or 60-something car in great shape you just bought and drive it mostly trouble-free, like your late model car. Just read the recent threads from pitbullady; bought old car on a loan, tried to daily-drive it, having one frustration after another... sad situation, as pitbullady's finding out the hard way the realities of mixing old cars and real, everyday life.........

That's how a good many old cars survive 40 or 50 years or more, only to get parked out in the tall grass to rot away.

I don't know the writer; so I can't say whether he's a whiner or not. But I CAN say, based on this article, that he definitely has real-world experience with an old car!

Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

bams50
06-14-2007, 04:55 AM
As I said, romanticizing... and that's fine. So long as inexperienced folks get an idea of what they're getting into. Reminds me of when folks think it's a great idea to buy bunnies for little ones for Easter; sure are cute- till you find out they bite, and you clean their cage a few times... then the poor rabbit's killed, or ditched in the wild, or pawned off on someone who may or may not be willing/able to care for it properly...

Every one of us knows someone, or have seen a situation somewhere, where a car is torn apart for restoration and just stopped, or a restored car that needs redoing because it was neglected, or abandoned in the back lot. If you haven't, just go to eBay; you'll always find cars that say something like, "Had planned to restore but lost interest"...

We can say the writer's a whiner if we want; but the fact is, he's given some insight into the reality of old cars! I'd rather see that article than one that tells folks new to the hobby that everything's going to be great, and you're going to be able to jump into that 50 or 60-something car in great shape you just bought and drive it mostly trouble-free, like your late model car. Just read the recent threads from pitbullady; bought old car on a loan, tried to daily-drive it, having one frustration after another... sad situation, as pitbullady's finding out the hard way the realities of mixing old cars and real, everyday life.........

That's how a good many old cars survive 40 or 50 years or more, only to get parked out in the tall grass to rot away.

I don't know the writer; so I can't say whether he's a whiner or not. But I CAN say, based on this article, that he definitely has real-world experience with an old car!

Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
Parish, central NY 13131
http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

go-studebaker
06-14-2007, 08:08 AM
Hi Guys,
well I found the writers points interesting, and totally valid. To give the guy credit, he has had the car and used it for quite a while.

However, that car is just a poorly serviced car and the guy who owns it is not that mechanically minded or ready to throw money into i to make it right the Studebaker way. Most mechanics that are not familiar with Studebakers cant get Studebakers going like some of us Studebaker experts can. That is a big problem.

Once the honeymoon is over of buying the car and getting used to its driving, you just have to accept it is an older type car. If you dont get over that hurdle then the old car hobby is not for you. You end up being like the Chinese lady on another discussion that cant understand why anybody would even want an old banger.

I dont think Studebakers are any less reliable than modern cars, but they were designed in a time when they had to be serviced more than those new cars. I have broken down with my Studebakers occasionally, but even new cars stop. Even when my Studebakers broke I have only once not been able to limp home.

I have owned driven a genuine Avanti since I was 24 and when you are younger you are a bit more resiliant to the extremes of temperature. I only have an 88 Avanti now and that is not hot in the cabin and it has a great heater and demisters.
Genuine Avanti's are hot in the cabin. For goodness sake guys it was designed as a sports car and that goes with the teritory in that period. If you ordered a 1962 Ferrari, it too, is hot in the cabin. An Avanti is a real 'he mans' driving car and the noise it makes inside and outside is all part of that equation. Who cares if you are belting through a Swiss tunnel at over 100mph in your blown car with hot dogs for exhaust and you cant here what the passenger says, because your weapon is growling like an angry cat, or humping it on a German Autobarn. Just the sweet sound of all those horses dancing under the bonnet and the whistle of the blower is music enough. Of course in Australia, Canada and America you cant drive at those speeds and get caught, but the fun is still there.

Most of you drive Studebakers because you choose to and because you put up with the bazzar fact that they are now approching a 50 year old car.

I would think that a nicely set up late model Studebaker is every bit as good or better than an Australian made car to about 1990.

Granted, those new fangled cars wih key start and working wireless etc are like cocoons, drive nice and are as quiet as a church mouse, but they have one bad thing going for them. Boy are they just so boring. snooorrrrrrrr

I suppose my problem is, that in all reality, I just cant afford a new car, so I just put up with my beautiful riding, well serviced, gas guzzling Studebakers instead.

There is one other excellent feature that I like about Studebakers. They dont leak oil, they just mark their teritory. Modern cars just dont do that.

Am I a little one eyed, or is everybody else off the planet in outer space somewhere.



Greg Diffen
Australian Stude nut living in Warwick, United Kingdom

1933 St Regis Brougham Model 56 Dutch delivered
1937 Dicator sedan. Australian Body by TJ Richards
1939 Packard Seven Passenger monster UK delivered
1939 Commander Swiss Cabriolet by Lagenthal
1988 Avanti Convertible

go-studebaker
06-14-2007, 08:08 AM
Hi Guys,
well I found the writers points interesting, and totally valid. To give the guy credit, he has had the car and used it for quite a while.

However, that car is just a poorly serviced car and the guy who owns it is not that mechanically minded or ready to throw money into i to make it right the Studebaker way. Most mechanics that are not familiar with Studebakers cant get Studebakers going like some of us Studebaker experts can. That is a big problem.

Once the honeymoon is over of buying the car and getting used to its driving, you just have to accept it is an older type car. If you dont get over that hurdle then the old car hobby is not for you. You end up being like the Chinese lady on another discussion that cant understand why anybody would even want an old banger.

I dont think Studebakers are any less reliable than modern cars, but they were designed in a time when they had to be serviced more than those new cars. I have broken down with my Studebakers occasionally, but even new cars stop. Even when my Studebakers broke I have only once not been able to limp home.

I have owned driven a genuine Avanti since I was 24 and when you are younger you are a bit more resiliant to the extremes of temperature. I only have an 88 Avanti now and that is not hot in the cabin and it has a great heater and demisters.
Genuine Avanti's are hot in the cabin. For goodness sake guys it was designed as a sports car and that goes with the teritory in that period. If you ordered a 1962 Ferrari, it too, is hot in the cabin. An Avanti is a real 'he mans' driving car and the noise it makes inside and outside is all part of that equation. Who cares if you are belting through a Swiss tunnel at over 100mph in your blown car with hot dogs for exhaust and you cant here what the passenger says, because your weapon is growling like an angry cat, or humping it on a German Autobarn. Just the sweet sound of all those horses dancing under the bonnet and the whistle of the blower is music enough. Of course in Australia, Canada and America you cant drive at those speeds and get caught, but the fun is still there.

Most of you drive Studebakers because you choose to and because you put up with the bazzar fact that they are now approching a 50 year old car.

I would think that a nicely set up late model Studebaker is every bit as good or better than an Australian made car to about 1990.

Granted, those new fangled cars wih key start and working wireless etc are like cocoons, drive nice and are as quiet as a church mouse, but they have one bad thing going for them. Boy are they just so boring. snooorrrrrrrr

I suppose my problem is, that in all reality, I just cant afford a new car, so I just put up with my beautiful riding, well serviced, gas guzzling Studebakers instead.

There is one other excellent feature that I like about Studebakers. They dont leak oil, they just mark their teritory. Modern cars just dont do that.

Am I a little one eyed, or is everybody else off the planet in outer space somewhere.



Greg Diffen
Australian Stude nut living in Warwick, United Kingdom

1933 St Regis Brougham Model 56 Dutch delivered
1937 Dicator sedan. Australian Body by TJ Richards
1939 Packard Seven Passenger monster UK delivered
1939 Commander Swiss Cabriolet by Lagenthal
1988 Avanti Convertible

bonehead007
06-14-2007, 08:27 AM
Got to read the article and wonder how can he compare a 50 year old car to the cars made today ??? Back then cars had a more "human " touch from concept to manufacturing.. Today, computers are used in the process of car manufacturing.

His comparison is like comparing a 707 to a 777...

As far as reliabilty, sure they are better built and more reliable but, thats due to the computeriztion and competition from abroad, not much around back in 1963. Also, at least back then you could do some of the basic work on your car. Today, you need a 10,000 diagnostic computer to have the cars computer tell you where the trouble is...And I've already had to go through my state lemon law to get the manufacturer to take back a car a few years back..

I purchased my Avanti because I've always wanted one since I was a kid and to get the satisfaction of restoring, or attempting to restore, the car. If he is so unhappy with it, sell it, theres always someone else who would be more than happy to take it off his hands

bonehead007
06-14-2007, 08:27 AM
Got to read the article and wonder how can he compare a 50 year old car to the cars made today ??? Back then cars had a more "human " touch from concept to manufacturing.. Today, computers are used in the process of car manufacturing.

His comparison is like comparing a 707 to a 777...

As far as reliabilty, sure they are better built and more reliable but, thats due to the computeriztion and competition from abroad, not much around back in 1963. Also, at least back then you could do some of the basic work on your car. Today, you need a 10,000 diagnostic computer to have the cars computer tell you where the trouble is...And I've already had to go through my state lemon law to get the manufacturer to take back a car a few years back..

I purchased my Avanti because I've always wanted one since I was a kid and to get the satisfaction of restoring, or attempting to restore, the car. If he is so unhappy with it, sell it, theres always someone else who would be more than happy to take it off his hands

Scott
06-14-2007, 09:04 AM
The writer seems to assume that the Avanti came out of the factory with all the problems he's having already manifesting themselves. If you think about it, that's a ridiculous assumption. IF it was true, then we would all have very vivid memories of the bad old days when, at any one time, you would see maybe 30% of cars parked by the side of the highway with the driver draped over the front fender trying to figure out what went wrong THIS time. I have no such memories. I remember cars breaking down during trips more often, but not to the extent that as a whole they were ever deemed unreliable (excepting of course, certain Ford and GM products). I certainly never remember riding down the highway past a parade of stationary cars and irate drivers stopped in their tracks.

He also doesn't seem to realize that gasoline formulations have changed - and not to the advantage of carbureted systems.

Scott
06-14-2007, 09:04 AM
The writer seems to assume that the Avanti came out of the factory with all the problems he's having already manifesting themselves. If you think about it, that's a ridiculous assumption. IF it was true, then we would all have very vivid memories of the bad old days when, at any one time, you would see maybe 30% of cars parked by the side of the highway with the driver draped over the front fender trying to figure out what went wrong THIS time. I have no such memories. I remember cars breaking down during trips more often, but not to the extent that as a whole they were ever deemed unreliable (excepting of course, certain Ford and GM products). I certainly never remember riding down the highway past a parade of stationary cars and irate drivers stopped in their tracks.

He also doesn't seem to realize that gasoline formulations have changed - and not to the advantage of carbureted systems.

8E45E
06-14-2007, 09:13 AM
As far as reliabilty, sure they are better built and more reliable but, thats due to the computeriztion and competition from abroad, not much around back in 1963. Also, at least back then you could do some of the basic work on your car. Today, you need a 10,000 diagnostic computer to have the cars computer tell you where the trouble is.

The biggest evidence of the above is the en-masse disappearance of the neighborhood corner garage! The one, two, and three bay 'service' stations have long been replaced by 'convenience' stores when you fill up the car with gas now. True, there are a few left, but they are mostly limited to tire repair, oil changes, and minor stuff. The major procedures, including diagnosis is usually performed by the car dealer now.

Craig.

8E45E
06-14-2007, 09:13 AM
As far as reliabilty, sure they are better built and more reliable but, thats due to the computeriztion and competition from abroad, not much around back in 1963. Also, at least back then you could do some of the basic work on your car. Today, you need a 10,000 diagnostic computer to have the cars computer tell you where the trouble is.

The biggest evidence of the above is the en-masse disappearance of the neighborhood corner garage! The one, two, and three bay 'service' stations have long been replaced by 'convenience' stores when you fill up the car with gas now. True, there are a few left, but they are mostly limited to tire repair, oil changes, and minor stuff. The major procedures, including diagnosis is usually performed by the car dealer now.

Craig.

bonehead007
06-14-2007, 10:54 AM
I meant $10,000 diagnostic computer..sorry about that. The only reason I know is that the mechanic at my corner garage has one and said thats what it cost. It's needed to pinpoint which of the many pollution parts on the car is kaput...If you go to the dealer, even worse. The Toyota dealer told my wife it was $150 just to "dignose" the trouble..

I'd still like to know if he has the car and if he does and is so negative about it, why is he keeping it???

bonehead007
06-14-2007, 10:54 AM
I meant $10,000 diagnostic computer..sorry about that. The only reason I know is that the mechanic at my corner garage has one and said thats what it cost. It's needed to pinpoint which of the many pollution parts on the car is kaput...If you go to the dealer, even worse. The Toyota dealer told my wife it was $150 just to "dignose" the trouble..

I'd still like to know if he has the car and if he does and is so negative about it, why is he keeping it???

8E45E
06-14-2007, 11:02 AM
[quote]Originally posted by bonehead007

I meant $10,000 diagnostic computer..sorry about that. The only reason I know is that the mechanic at my corner garage has one and said thats what it cost.

That $10,000 is just the START!! What you have to get every two years or so are UPGRADE CARDS! They cost anywhere from $1,000 to $2000 for EACH car manufacturer! (Another reason why some garages are only specializing certain makes now). Not a pleasent thought for someone running a small town operation.

Craig

8E45E
06-14-2007, 11:02 AM
[quote]Originally posted by bonehead007

I meant $10,000 diagnostic computer..sorry about that. The only reason I know is that the mechanic at my corner garage has one and said thats what it cost.

That $10,000 is just the START!! What you have to get every two years or so are UPGRADE CARDS! They cost anywhere from $1,000 to $2000 for EACH car manufacturer! (Another reason why some garages are only specializing certain makes now). Not a pleasent thought for someone running a small town operation.

Craig

Laemmle
06-15-2007, 03:41 PM
Hey,
Nothing wrong with the quote....the folks in California dance to the sound of a much different exhaust note.....too much Peets coffee, while reading that rag.......aka San Francisco Chronicle..


quote:Originally posted by vegas paul

Robert - Sorry, I didn't mean that mechanics weren't used by "real" Stude owners, but I got the impression from the entire tone of the article that this owner felt "entitled" to a trouble free classic car, and his mechanic was responsible for supplying that trouble-free performance. I guess my anti-California, left-coast elitist bias was showing! My aplogies to the left-leaning Stude owners!

Las Vegas, NV
'51 Champion Business Coupe G899965 10G-Q4-1434
http://i151.photobucket.com/albums/s144/vegas_paul/1462673_2_350.jpg?t=1180041622 http://i151.photobucket.com/albums/s144/vegas_paul/graciestude.jpg?t=1180041703

Laemmle
06-15-2007, 03:41 PM
Hey,
Nothing wrong with the quote....the folks in California dance to the sound of a much different exhaust note.....too much Peets coffee, while reading that rag.......aka San Francisco Chronicle..


quote:Originally posted by vegas paul

Robert - Sorry, I didn't mean that mechanics weren't used by "real" Stude owners, but I got the impression from the entire tone of the article that this owner felt "entitled" to a trouble free classic car, and his mechanic was responsible for supplying that trouble-free performance. I guess my anti-California, left-coast elitist bias was showing! My aplogies to the left-leaning Stude owners!

Las Vegas, NV
'51 Champion Business Coupe G899965 10G-Q4-1434
http://i151.photobucket.com/albums/s144/vegas_paul/1462673_2_350.jpg?t=1180041622 http://i151.photobucket.com/albums/s144/vegas_paul/graciestude.jpg?t=1180041703

tbredehoft
06-15-2007, 04:19 PM
His 'criticism' of the Avanti is well founded, HOWEVER how accurate would his comments be if he were talking about his 'new' car 43 years from now, should it survive that long in original running condition?

[img=left]http://www.alink.com/personal/tbredehoft/Bothcars.jpg[/img=left]
Tom Bredehoft
'53 Commander Coupe
'60 Lark VI
'05 Legacy Ltd Wagon
All three Indiana built OD cars

tbredehoft
06-15-2007, 04:19 PM
His 'criticism' of the Avanti is well founded, HOWEVER how accurate would his comments be if he were talking about his 'new' car 43 years from now, should it survive that long in original running condition?

[img=left]http://www.alink.com/personal/tbredehoft/Bothcars.jpg[/img=left]
Tom Bredehoft
'53 Commander Coupe
'60 Lark VI
'05 Legacy Ltd Wagon
All three Indiana built OD cars

th12t33n
06-17-2007, 11:22 AM
his honda in 40 years wont be anything comparable to the avanti.

62 Lark Hardtop, 289 v8 stude power.

th12t33n
06-17-2007, 11:22 AM
his honda in 40 years wont be anything comparable to the avanti.

62 Lark Hardtop, 289 v8 stude power.

jgrohs
06-18-2007, 11:21 AM
not everyone in California is that way- though anyone who lives in S.F. proper would probably fit your impression to a "T"

As the president of the local aoai chapter in northern cal, I tried to contact the author to offer up any resources he hadn't found ( like Stude's West in Redwood City - about 30 miles south of him). Haven't heard back from him.



[quote]Originally posted by Laemmle

Hey,
Nothing wrong with the quote....the folks in California dance to the sound of a much different exhaust note.....too much Peets coffee, while reading that rag.......aka San Francisco Chronicle..

jgrohs
06-18-2007, 11:21 AM
not everyone in California is that way- though anyone who lives in S.F. proper would probably fit your impression to a "T"

As the president of the local aoai chapter in northern cal, I tried to contact the author to offer up any resources he hadn't found ( like Stude's West in Redwood City - about 30 miles south of him). Haven't heard back from him.



[quote]Originally posted by Laemmle

Hey,
Nothing wrong with the quote....the folks in California dance to the sound of a much different exhaust note.....too much Peets coffee, while reading that rag.......aka San Francisco Chronicle..

Thomas63R2
06-19-2007, 01:00 AM
Jeff, when the phone doesn't ring you'll know that Paul was thinking of your email. He will not reply to any Avanti related emails - this was his wife's Avanti, his interest is in looking at his own clever writing. He would be bored to tears to really learn anything about Studebaker in general or Avanti specifically. Chances are excellent that he is actually a car hater - most likely he is bothered to know there are people who like and enjoy driving ther Avanti.

Thomas

New Stude guy! Long time hot rodder
'63 Avanti R2 4 speed with interesting plans

Thomas63R2
06-19-2007, 01:00 AM
Jeff, when the phone doesn't ring you'll know that Paul was thinking of your email. He will not reply to any Avanti related emails - this was his wife's Avanti, his interest is in looking at his own clever writing. He would be bored to tears to really learn anything about Studebaker in general or Avanti specifically. Chances are excellent that he is actually a car hater - most likely he is bothered to know there are people who like and enjoy driving ther Avanti.

Thomas

New Stude guy! Long time hot rodder
'63 Avanti R2 4 speed with interesting plans

Dick Steinkamp
06-19-2007, 06:03 AM
quote:Originally posted by Laemmle

Hey,
Nothing wrong with the quote....the folks in California dance to the sound of a much different exhaust note.....too much Peets coffee, while reading that rag.......aka San Francisco Chronicle..




That's a pretty silly statement. Sort of like painting everyone from Las Vegas with the same brush. You OK with that? Do you really think there is no one on this forum from California, or do you just not care who you insult (from behind your keyboard)?

http://thenobot.org/images/s2d/s2d_01.jpg

Dick Steinkamp
06-19-2007, 06:03 AM
quote:Originally posted by Laemmle

Hey,
Nothing wrong with the quote....the folks in California dance to the sound of a much different exhaust note.....too much Peets coffee, while reading that rag.......aka San Francisco Chronicle..




That's a pretty silly statement. Sort of like painting everyone from Las Vegas with the same brush. You OK with that? Do you really think there is no one on this forum from California, or do you just not care who you insult (from behind your keyboard)?

http://thenobot.org/images/s2d/s2d_01.jpg

60V-C61530
06-19-2007, 10:24 PM
Quite possibly this owner may be a product of his time, he apparently
doesn't know how to care for a car this old and doesn't really want to learn how. What I understood from his story is that he wasn't interested in the car after the new wore off, only the cool factor of owning a vintage sports car. Everyone likes the look at me feeling,
but it just isn't the same if you are broke down on the side of the road.
Some people shouldn't be allowed to own a car period, we have all seen the 1000 watt amplifier supported on 2000.00 dollar wheels with
the exhaust trying to compete with the music.
My wife, after 45 years ,still can't understand that it is possible to
change the position of the needle on the gas gauge simply by putting
gas in the fill tube, she's driven this car since 1962 and still can't
find it.
Some of us old buzzards cut our teeth on a wrench, those days are gone forever. I have learned that a studebaker is susceptable to threats much like our children were when they were little. I have often threatened to leave the old girl in the first salvage yard I came to. With 23 trips back and forth across the states, the last from Oklahoma to Florida some 1200 miles, with never a hiccup.
Then again I grew up in a family of mechanics, it was made clear
that if you were going to drive it then you better be able to understand it and fix it. The one thing I still can't understand is
if you have a spare part in the trunk, you will never need it.
My wife can't understand why I buy two of everything, I tell her when
this car wears out I'm buying another one just like it. 1 part at a time, no car payments.
Some people like the " look at that factor " but not the smashed fingers or the skin and hair hanging from the hood safety catch or the
grease under their fingernails.
My other car, 90.00 to diagnois, 22.00 parts, labor 7 minutes, the check engine lite went off but the problem was the speed sensor on the
differential......check engine. Sparkplugs: 370.00 labor, 39.00 parts,
Not just NO, but hell no, I'll do it myself, 4 hours later, 8 new plugs
all the same brand and heat range, not what I removed, 5 of one type,
3 of another. Nothing stripped or cross threaded. I can't stand up straight or breath deeply for three days but I know that It's right
and that I can do it. Paid the mechanic 3 double shot of scotch and
a six pack of dark beer, not bad pay for 3 days when your'e retired.
John

I was approached while sitting at a stop light last week by a very
gigglie lady in her early seventies. After much arm waving and gently
caressing the front fender of the Hawk, she bent down and confessed
" I just love these hawks...I lost my cherry in the back seat of one
just like this...best sex I've ever had." After she had reached the
sidewalk she turned and waived. Four horn blasts later I drove on.
After a quiet four or five minutes the wife errupted into laughter.
What's so funny I asked. She's right you know, about the back seat, I was just compairing, best sex I ever had too, but I wouldn't want to try it now. So much for the cool factor.

60V-C61530
06-19-2007, 10:24 PM
Quite possibly this owner may be a product of his time, he apparently
doesn't know how to care for a car this old and doesn't really want to learn how. What I understood from his story is that he wasn't interested in the car after the new wore off, only the cool factor of owning a vintage sports car. Everyone likes the look at me feeling,
but it just isn't the same if you are broke down on the side of the road.
Some people shouldn't be allowed to own a car period, we have all seen the 1000 watt amplifier supported on 2000.00 dollar wheels with
the exhaust trying to compete with the music.
My wife, after 45 years ,still can't understand that it is possible to
change the position of the needle on the gas gauge simply by putting
gas in the fill tube, she's driven this car since 1962 and still can't
find it.
Some of us old buzzards cut our teeth on a wrench, those days are gone forever. I have learned that a studebaker is susceptable to threats much like our children were when they were little. I have often threatened to leave the old girl in the first salvage yard I came to. With 23 trips back and forth across the states, the last from Oklahoma to Florida some 1200 miles, with never a hiccup.
Then again I grew up in a family of mechanics, it was made clear
that if you were going to drive it then you better be able to understand it and fix it. The one thing I still can't understand is
if you have a spare part in the trunk, you will never need it.
My wife can't understand why I buy two of everything, I tell her when
this car wears out I'm buying another one just like it. 1 part at a time, no car payments.
Some people like the " look at that factor " but not the smashed fingers or the skin and hair hanging from the hood safety catch or the
grease under their fingernails.
My other car, 90.00 to diagnois, 22.00 parts, labor 7 minutes, the check engine lite went off but the problem was the speed sensor on the
differential......check engine. Sparkplugs: 370.00 labor, 39.00 parts,
Not just NO, but hell no, I'll do it myself, 4 hours later, 8 new plugs
all the same brand and heat range, not what I removed, 5 of one type,
3 of another. Nothing stripped or cross threaded. I can't stand up straight or breath deeply for three days but I know that It's right
and that I can do it. Paid the mechanic 3 double shot of scotch and
a six pack of dark beer, not bad pay for 3 days when your'e retired.
John

I was approached while sitting at a stop light last week by a very
gigglie lady in her early seventies. After much arm waving and gently
caressing the front fender of the Hawk, she bent down and confessed
" I just love these hawks...I lost my cherry in the back seat of one
just like this...best sex I've ever had." After she had reached the
sidewalk she turned and waived. Four horn blasts later I drove on.
After a quiet four or five minutes the wife errupted into laughter.
What's so funny I asked. She's right you know, about the back seat, I was just compairing, best sex I ever had too, but I wouldn't want to try it now. So much for the cool factor.