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Skip Lackie
10-12-2011, 08:24 AM
Am replacing the inner and outer oil seals on my 3R6 pickup with an early (non-TT) 44 axle. When disassembling, noticed that all the shims were on the right side. But for no good reason other than how we worked on the truck, we ended up setting the end play on the left axle. Should I move the shims to the left side, or will the system equalize itself? Since the shims are there to allow some movement of the axle, it seems to make sense to put them on the side with the end play.

I've only taken a couple of Stude axles apart, but all of them had all of the shims on one side. Yet the shop manual suggests equalizing them on both axles to the degree possible. Just out of curiosity, was there a reason (other than convenience) that all the shims were installed on one side?

rusty nut garage
10-12-2011, 10:20 AM
shop manual for the car states all the shims are on one side, the passenger side. it doesn't really matter if you have them on one or both, its a combination of total axle end play. The only reason I can say that its easier if its on one side so that your not going back and forth between axles.. Set up the first axle without then install the other side with excess shims. Tap the axles against each other this way you know the 1st axle installed is up against the backing plate. then add or subtract shims to get the correct end play.
Russ

Am replacing the inner and outer oil seals on my 3R6 pickup with an early (non-TT) 44 axle. When disassembling, noticed that all the shims were on the right side. But for no good reason other than how we worked on the truck, we ended up setting the end play on the left axle. Should I move the shims to the left side, or will the system equalize itself? Since the shims are there to allow some movement of the axle, it seems to make sense to put them on the side with the end play.

I've only taken a couple of Stude axles apart, but all of them had all of the shims on one side. Yet the shop manual suggests equalizing them on both axles to the degree possible. Just out of curiosity, was there a reason (other than convenience) that all the shims were installed on one side?

BobPalma
10-12-2011, 10:23 AM
What Russ said, Skip. BP

Skip Lackie
10-12-2011, 02:52 PM
Thanks guys. Just to make sure you don't think I'm making it up, the 3R shop manual says: ""If a large adjustment is made, add or remove shims from both locations equally to preserve the central position of the axles." I guess that makes sense when you add the qualifier about a "large adjustment".

BobPalma
10-12-2011, 03:06 PM
Yes, Skip; it does. Otherwise, there's no sense going to all the trouble to do so. BP

Skip Lackie
10-13-2011, 04:08 PM
I know we all honor and admire those who worked for Studebaker, but the 3R shop manual could have included a bit more info (or at least assume that not all users would be professional mechanics -- some might even be morons like me). The whole axle section is written in the singular -- as if there was only one axle to deal with -- until the sentence I quoted above. It really would have been helpful if it had stated it the way that Russ did -- completely assemble one side and then make the end play adjustments on the other side.

That said, the shop manuals for modern GM cars really DO assume the user is an idiot. Under "Battery replacement: Step 1: Open hood."

studegary
10-13-2011, 04:12 PM
I know we all honor and admire those who worked for Studebaker, but the 3R shop manual could have included a bit more info (or at least assume that not all users would be professional mechanics -- some might even be morons like me). The whole axle section is written in the singular -- as if there was only one axle to deal with -- until the sentence I quoted above. It really would have been helpful if it had stated it the way that Russ did -- completely assemble one side and then make the end play adjustments on the other side.

That said, the shop manuals for modern GM cars really DO assume the user is an idiot. Under "Battery replacement: Step 1: Open hood."

Skip - I think that you are pointing out the difference between today's parts changers and the mechanics that fixed things five decades ago.