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View Full Version : Stude mystery for 25 years! Can you help?



STEWDI
09-26-2011, 08:49 PM
A very good Studebaker friend has had a '62 Lark (4 door Skytop) for over 30 years - since he graduated from high school. Having immersed himself in '62 literature and lore (also the year he was born) he likes the "jazzy" Lark TV and radio commercials for that model year.

He wrote down the words for the "singing" TV commercials, but for the LAST 25 YEARS we have been stumped for the words of one line in the "What's got Jazz?" spot! PLEASE HELP!!

The words in question are about 1/2 way through, between-

Loads of room in the back,
Studebaker Lark - WHATEVER to the WHATEVER (can't quite make this out)
What's got jazz.......etc

Please listen to the words, let us know what they should be (sounds like "pay to the jack", but this, along with anything else we've come up with, makes no sense), and let us live the rest of our Studebaker lives in peace - the mystery finally, hopefully, having been SOLVED!!!:)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1AVMXubc-Vg

StudeRich
09-26-2011, 08:57 PM
"Saves you the Jack"? I think it should be Cash! Did we call Cash, Jack in those days? Lol! :confused:

Bob Andrews
09-26-2011, 09:01 PM
Yep, I think Rich got it.

STEWDI
09-26-2011, 09:17 PM
I'd say we need MORE help, Bob!:)

comatus
09-27-2011, 08:06 AM
The song is a re-write of a 1913 ragtime fox-trot called "Ballin' The Jack." It was a hit for Kid Ory and Jelly Roll Morton in the 20's, revived by Judy Garland in the 40's and Dean Martin in 1951. Other popular records were by Danny Kaye and (ready?) Annette Funicello.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gEeoRaTe_64

So, it is "Jack" for sure. Thanks, tip of the hat, and RIP to Miss Mary Mullett, the entire music department of my elementary school, who had a wicked stride in more ways than one, had played vaudeville pit bands on tenor banjo, and most likely knew what both "Buffalo Squeeze" and "Portland Through a Shot Glass" meant.

mookandairin
09-27-2011, 08:27 AM
Studebaker Lark "saves you the Jack" as in saves you the Jack(ing) of the car? or they are referring to cash.or it just fits because it rhymes.I honestly think tho they are trying to be hip and throw a little slang into the commercial. I have a very good speaker system here and it is clear as a bell.

comatus
09-27-2011, 10:05 AM
Yes, "Jack" is money! New Jack City.

It saves you the jack -- saves money, get it?
Evolving language KMA. This right here is where "evolving language" gets you. To.

mbstude
09-27-2011, 10:16 AM
Not quite on topic. But am I the only one that really likes this non-production grille?

http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk179/1959S2D/lark_grille.png

Bob Andrews
09-27-2011, 12:25 PM
Evolving language KMA. This right here is where "evolving language" gets you. To.

Ayup. Fo shizzle.

BobPalma
09-27-2011, 02:17 PM
Not quite on topic. But am I the only one that really likes this non-production grille?

http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk179/1959S2D/lark_grille.png

'Prolly one of several prototypes considered, Matthew. BP

mookandairin
09-27-2011, 03:46 PM
fo sheezie my nizzle!

MRHawkes
09-27-2011, 05:04 PM
After several listens and a check of what I wrote down, here is the entire commercial.

"Get yourself a Lark, plenty of flash, lots of style and comfort, not much cash, jazzy all around with lots of room in the back, Studebaker Lark take to the shack.
What's got jazz, speed and spark? Zip zoom and style from the 62 Lark.
Big car comfort, easy to park.
You're gonna have a ball in the Lark.
The 62 Lark."

Hope that helps, cute commerrcial.

When I had a few listens, I heard "..........LOADS of room in the back. Studebaker Lark, say to the Jack...." The rest may have been the questions to "Jack" or Joe Q. Public.
Roger, stay on the trail and let us know what your friend finally does write down. 25 years is a long time to copy the words to a short jingle.

comatus
09-27-2011, 08:54 PM
I give up.

STEWDI
09-27-2011, 09:30 PM
Comatus, it's quite the co-inkie-dink that the "Ballin' the Jack" record label on your You Tube reference was "Exner"!!

Don't give up! This thing needs "closure" (there's that word again!). It's been 25 YEARS!! AARRGHH!!

StudeRich
09-28-2011, 01:15 AM
Wait a minute, I thought this was solved: "Saves you the Jack"? Is the answer right? No? Certainly makes sense.

dnevin
09-28-2011, 09:33 AM
Wait a minute, I thought this was solved: "Saves you the Jack"? Is the answer right? No? Certainly makes sense.

"Saves you the Jack" is what I hear as well and I remember "Jack" being slang for money. . .

comatus
09-28-2011, 09:46 AM
All right. One more time. The jingle is an outright paraphrase (today we say "ripoff") of "Ballin' the Jack," a jaunty tune from the Great American Songbook. Witness the line "[have a] ball in the Lark." Therefore the use of "jack" is a foregone conclusion. "Jack" as a nickname for money does not originate in American usage -- it was English first. Nothing new there. Our problem appears to be that nobody says it any more.

Also noted, this ad could not be made for mass consumption today. Over twenty years after the song's original popularity, its key phrase accumulated a patina of innuendo. Counter-cultural street expressions traveled more slowly before the Urban Dictionary, so the song was still wink-and-a-nod cute in the early Sixties; by five years later everybody would get the joke.

STEWDI
10-01-2011, 12:12 AM
Thanks for your efforts, one and all.

One more time - "Saves you the Jack" , IMHO, is not likely correct BECAUSE 1) the jingle has ALREADY mentioned "Not much Cash" and
2) the obscure use of "jack" is not in character with the rest of the jazzy, otherwise easily understood, hip (not old fashioned for '62) jingle.

The real explanation is out there........

Using TV's Mythbuster rating system, "Saves you the Jack" is "Plausible".

Bish
10-02-2011, 08:42 AM
Bob, You should know that "ayup" has always been a part of Vermont vernacular for natives. I guess you may be forgiven, being a Tory New Yorker and most probably a Yankee fan :) Bish
Ayup. Fo shizzle.