PDA

View Full Version : Replacing rear oil seal in Studebaker Automatic Dr



s2dwagon
05-31-2007, 01:03 PM
I am currently in the process of replacing the rear seal in the automatic transmission in my 55 President. After several bandages and many select adjectives and adverbs, I finally got it out of the extension case.

Now, that my wounds have almost healed, I am getting ready to install the new rubber/felt seal. I have checked in the 55 shop manual for any installation techniques, and can not find anything that relates to this installation.

Is there anything different about installing this seal, as opposed to any other rear oil seal?

Please advise.

Thank you,

Scott

DEEPNHOCK
05-31-2007, 03:08 PM
Here are a couple of generic seal installation tips...
Since the hole (and the seal) are not 'perfectly' round...
They each have a few high spots on them.
That's why when you go to put a seal in a bore it 'rocks' a bit and doesn't sit comfortably every time.
The trick to a good seal installation is preparation.

a) Clean the old stuff out of the bore. It is a sealant the seal guys put on the case to help stop leakage around the OD of the case. It builds up and can cause problems on installation.

b) Use an install tool. Even if you have to make one, it will help keep the seal lined up to the bore and compress the OD of the case in a uniform manner. Beating them in with a hammer hitting it every hour around the clock is asking for trouble.
(Note: I make a lot of seal tools out of heavy wall PVC pipe and glue a cap on one end. Then you can reach over things like output shafts, and a rubber mallet makes them go in a lot easier).

c) Check the inner lip of the seal. "If' it has a spring retainer (garter spring), then you might want to pack it with grease, so that the jarring of installation doesn't knock the garter spring off the lip and into the trans or diff. That happens a lot and can cause a ton of grief.

d) 'Clock' the seal in the bore when you go to put it in.
Seals have a 'sweet spot' where the case will set on several points on the bore and it will feel stable and not 'rock'. Just take the seal in your hand and hold it up to the bore and 'feel' for the rock. Then rotate the seal a little and 'feel' for the rock again. You may go halfway around, but there will be a spot where it feels nice and stable. That's the sweet spot. Take your tool and put it up against the seal and start driving it into the bore.
Your first hit with the hammer should be a firm contact, enough to start the seal case into the bore.
You don't want to crush it with a gorilla swing, but no lil' tap-tap-tap either.
Line it up and hit it. If you've done the alignment step properly, it'll start fine.
And when you drive the seal in. Only go until it is even with the outer case, or where the case just bottoms out. There's nothing good going to come from giving it one more smack for good luck.
You'll just bend something, or hurt yourself.

e) Take your time inspecting, and prepping your yoke, or stub shaft, or spindle. Make sure it is clean, and has no knicks in it. No sense doing it all over again...

f) If your shaft is grooved, check our a Speedi-Sleeve (SKF), or a Redi-Sleeve (Nat'l).. They may well save you a shaft, and they work with most seals. (Tip: The last three numbers are the size of the shaft on a Speedi-Sleeve... The first three numbers are the size of the shaft on an SKF grease seal)...

Hope the info helps....
(from an old seal and bearing guy..)
Jeff[8D]



quote:Originally posted by s2dwagon

I am currently in the process of replacing the rear seal in the automatic transmission in my 55 President. After several bandages and many select adjectives and adverbs, I finally got it out of the extension case.
Now, that my wounds have almost healed, I am getting ready to install the new rubber/felt seal. I have checked in the 55 shop manual for any installation techniques, and can not find anything that relates to this installation.
Is there anything different about installing this seal, as opposed to any other rear oil seal?
Please advise.
Thank you,
Scott