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View Full Version : Brakes: Need a bleeder system



Bob Andrews
07-21-2011, 11:16 PM
Interestingly, I have never owned one. I've always waited until I could get somebody to pump the pedal for me. Would be easier to be able to do it when I want to.

I'm not ready to pay $400 for a Max Pro, but I'm not thinking Pep Boys $10 unit either.

What do you have or recommend?

64V-K7
07-21-2011, 11:21 PM
Mount a reservoir on the firewall and let gravity do the rest.......:-))

54stude
07-21-2011, 11:29 PM
I have a motive products unit that I have used for maybe 10 years on european cars. It is really simple, and has the bonus of refilling the master or clutch cylinder as you are bleeding. These work great for hydraulic clutches also!

http://store.motiveproducts.com/bleeders-c15.aspx

You can create your own adapters with the top off of another old cylinder, making it a universal unit.

Tom B
07-22-2011, 01:10 AM
I'm fairly satisfied with the one I got from Harbor Freight, it takes an air compressor, though to create a siphon.

Mike Van Veghten
07-22-2011, 11:52 AM
The cheapest method and also very easy.

A can or bottle with about an inch of fresh fluid in it.
A clear plastic hose that will go to the bottom of the fresh fluid. Solid color hose will work also, just the clear lets you see exactly what's happening.
Make sure the line is at the bottom of the fluid.
Fill the reservoir with fresh fluid.
Loosen the bleed screw.
Slowly pump the pedal four or five times. Verify the reservoir is full.
Pump the pedal a few more times, check the reservoir. You'll get a feel for the amount of fluid spent per pump.
Do this till all bubbles are gone out of the line...OR till you have a solid pedal.
Tighten the bleed screw.
Fill the reservoir.

The hose in the fluid keeps air out of the system from the beginning. It becomes a part of the system for the time it's connected.
You learn these things when there's no one around to pump the pedal for you while you play with the bleeder screw...

One person, about 5 minutes per corner, simple, and best of all cheap.

Mike

N8N
07-22-2011, 11:55 AM
+1 on Motive Products. they make an adapter for the underfloor style Stude MCs too, but you'll have to roll your own for the firewall mounted ones or else use the clamp on style. Not that expensive and recommended.

nate

ROADRACELARK
07-22-2011, 02:08 PM
Attention CASOS

For under $25 you can make your own like the Motive Products style. Home Depot has the pump up garden sprayers for $10-$15 I bought a couple of brass hose adapters to use some of the quick disconnect air line fittings. I have accumulated one of almost all of the Studebaker M/C caps, drilled a 3/8" hole and with some JB Weld, screwd the male fitting into the cap and presto....you're ready to "bleed". I have made two, one for DOT3 and one for DOT5. I have had these for over 10 years and the brake fluid has not harmed either. Using a junction block, I have incorporated a lever type shut off valve and a pressure gauge, you only need 10 or 15 pounds to bleed a system. After each use, I flush out the hoses with denatured alcohol. The only caution is, when pressurizing the bottle, operate the pump very slowly as not to generate an excessive amount of air bubbles. The supply tube from the bottle draws the fluid from the very bottom. As for other cars, most parts stores sell a universal M/C lid with a thick rubber gasket and chain clamps to fit single and split M/Cs. This is a sure fire CASO way to bleed your brakes AND do it by yourself!!! Hope this helps

Dan Miller
Auburn, GA

mbstude
07-22-2011, 02:23 PM
Attention CASOS

For under $25 you can make your own like the Motive Products style. Home Depot has the pump up garden sprayers for $10-$15 I bought a couple of brass hose adapters to use some of the quick disconnect air line fittings. I have accumulated one of almost all of the Studebaker M/C caps, drilled a 3/8" hole and with some JB Weld, screwd the male fitting into the cap and presto....you're ready to "bleed". I have made two, one for DOT3 and one for DOT5. I have had these for over 10 years and the brake fluid has not harmed either. Using a junction block, I have incorporated a lever type shut off valve and a pressure gauge, you only need 10 or 15 pounds to bleed a system. After each use, I flush out the hoses with denatured alcohol. The only caution is, when pressurizing the bottle, operate the pump very slowly as not to generate an excessive amount of air bubbles. The supply tube from the bottle draws the fluid from the very bottom. As for other cars, most parts stores sell a universal M/C lid with a thick rubber gasket and chain clamps to fit single and split M/Cs. This is a sure fire CASO way to bleed your brakes AND do it by yourself!!! Hope this helps

Dan Miller
Auburn, GA

And there's photos on this thread.

http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?42829-Brake-Bleeding-flushing-w-Hill-Holder

ROADRACELARK
07-22-2011, 03:29 PM
Thanks Matthew. The old memory ain't what it used to be, but you're too young to know. My dear departed Dad always used to say " Your memory is gona' be the 2nd thing to go and you'll know what the first thing is". Barbara and I will see you and your'ns tommorrow. Again, thanks

Dan Miller
Auburn, GA

Bob Andrews
07-22-2011, 04:22 PM
Excellent info guys, great ideas as usual. A few different ways to choose from. Much appreciated!!

bige
07-22-2011, 05:17 PM
Here's what I bought, http://www.amazon.com/Advanced-Tool-Design-ATD-5125-Bleeder/dp/B000OUX9JU/ref=sr_1_31?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1311369245&sr=1-31similar to the Motive system others have recommended. Works fine but you'll need adapters. I did the bleed on the 4 wheel disc conversion on the late, great Avanti. I'm sure it would do well on any system with the right MC adapter.

ErnieR

Paul Keller
07-22-2011, 06:37 PM
Have used "Russell" brand self bleeding units for many years - They work great and are dependable. Basically, they have a spring loaded check valve to allow fluid flow only out, no air intake. They are tightened (like a OE bleeder) in normal use. When bleeding the system, they are loosened about 1/2 turn. Pumping the pedal forces out the old, the check valve keeps air out when the redal is released - slick and easy. just have to remember to keep the MC resevoir full of new fluid at all times.
PaulTK

whacker
07-22-2011, 09:35 PM
" Your memory is gona' be the 2nd thing to go and you'll know what the first thing is"

I always heard, your memory is the second thing to go. I forgot the first.

PACKERBACKER
07-23-2011, 10:20 PM
I use a Speedi-bleed system. http://www.speedibleed.com/products/specialitykits2.php It uses air from a tire to force the brake fluid and air through. The reservoir holds clean brake fluid so you do not need to keep filling the master cylinder. It works better than any system I have used and is super quick though not the cheapest! It does not use hardly any air from the tire that you connect it to.

Aussie Hawk
07-24-2011, 04:59 PM
And there's photos on this thread.

http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/showthread.php?42829-Brake-Bleeding-flushing-w-Hill-Holder

To those that have used the 'Garden Sprayer type' - Do you lose much brake fluid when you remove the adaptor cap from the top of the m/c ? I would imagine the m/c is totally full, and some would be in the line between the valve and cap.

ROADRACELARK
07-24-2011, 06:14 PM
Matt,

That's the reason I incorporated the shut-off valve just above the quick disconnect fitting on the cap. Yes, you might loose a teaspoon of fluid, but a rag will easily catch what does come out if you're carefull. On some of the newer cars the M/Cs are mounted tilted at an angle and yes THEY can be a mess to clean up. All said, these are far superior to the vacuum type that tend to draw in air around the bleed screw threads instead of pulling the fluid through. The pressure systems operate the same as if someone was pressing the brake pedal down, only here the M/C won't go dry. Hope this helps.

Dan Miller
Auburn, GA

54stude
07-24-2011, 06:15 PM
No, when you use the motive products or "garden sprayer" type bleeders, there is not a lot of spilling. Since there is air space at the top of the brake reservoir when you start, and since the fluid leaves the bottom of the m/c, there is no place for the air to go, so the cylinder does not get overfilled. Just remember to remove the pressure from the bleeder before you pull the cap from the m/c, or that would cause a mess:)

studebaker-R2-4-me
07-24-2011, 09:46 PM
The cheapest method and also very easy.

A can or bottle with about an inch of fresh fluid in it.
A clear plastic hose that will go to the bottom of the fresh fluid. Solid color hose will work also, just the clear lets you see exactly what's happening.
Make sure the line is at the bottom of the fluid.
Fill the reservoir with fresh fluid.
Loosen the bleed screw.
Slowly pump the pedal four or five times. Verify the reservoir is full.
Pump the pedal a few more times, check the reservoir. You'll get a feel for the amount of fluid spent per pump.
Do this till all bubbles are gone out of the line...OR till you have a solid pedal.
Tighten the bleed screw.
Fill the reservoir.

The hose in the fluid keeps air out of the system from the beginning. It becomes a part of the system for the time it's connected.
You learn these things when there's no one around to pump the pedal for you while you play with the bleeder screw...

One person, about 5 minutes per corner, simple, and best of all cheap.

Mike

That's the way I do it. I drill a hole in the plastic water bottle top and stick a clear plastic hose from the bleeder screw through the bottle top into the 1/4 filled bottle of brake fluid. Easy and you can see the old fluid filling the bottle and it does not make a mess.

Allen