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rockinhawk
07-10-2011, 07:34 PM
I was driving my old truck down a dirt road with G-Son Joshua riding shotgun. I saw a tiny Fawn step into the road.
I locked the brakes down and plowed some extra ruts into the road but came to a stop just beyond the little fellow. Josh said" I think we ran over him, Papa."
We got out, went back to see about it and found a still little body lying beside our tracks. Josh ,with tears in his eyes, picked it up. Suddenly he exclaimed "He's alive Papa!" I still didn't have much hope for it but as Joshua held it and stroked it , the deer began to come around. Grand daughter Ashton had recently found one and brought it home. It went to my sons house for awhile before being sent to a wildlife rehab facility, so I called him. We heard somthing moving in the bushes near the roadside and assumed it was the mama. We were near James' house so he came to assist.
By the time James got to us the deer seemed to have made a full recovery. The only thing I can figure is the deer must have run into the wheel on the truck and was knock out cold.
James said the doe was probably nearby and if we released the baby, she would come to it. Josh placed it on the ground. Her legs were still wobbly, but she gained her footing soon andwalked into some under brush and laid down. Practically dissapearing into her surroundings. We fired up the old truck, found 1st gear and headed home. James turned his 51 Starlight around went his way.
Just before dark James went back to check on her and said she was gone. Hopefully Mama came back for the little one.

These babies are ruining my appitite For venison.



Hopefully pictures will be added soon Thanks to Deepnhock.

stupak
07-10-2011, 07:54 PM
Deer are one of the most magificant creatures that God put on this earth. Anyone that helps them when in need is a 'special person'. stupak

DEEPNHOCK
07-10-2011, 08:26 PM
10104
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Milaca
07-10-2011, 09:16 PM
I noticed a deer consistently hanging around my place for 2 or 3 weeks now. I'd see it morning and night and I would sometimes get near it without even knowing until it would loudly snort at me. I began to wonder if it maybe had a fawn laying nearby, but I never saw one...until this morning when I looked out my kitchen window and there it was! Mother and fawn together eating clover on my lawn until they had enough of me staring at them (with camera in hand) and they proceded into the woods and quickly disappeared. I didnt see them around tonight, perhaps they are journeying farther away from home now.

satdoc2
07-10-2011, 11:06 PM
We have a pet deer (Sally) that took up with our Great Dane (Tex). She came to our place 2 years ago. She really loves Tex. He used to roam our neighborhood until we fenced our 5 acres and she would stay right with him. They would be gone at tines for 3 or more days at a time. Our cat would go with them, but they would all return together. She loves to be petted and have her neck rubbed. She comes into my garage at times when I am working on one of my Studebakers and wants attention. Maybe she will find a boyfriend (male deer) this winter and we will be surprized with a fawn next spring
Allen

stupak
07-11-2011, 08:14 AM
All deer lovers: A hunter friend of mine explained to me one time why deer must be hunted and 'thined'. I guess I understand the reasoning BUT I would never kill a deer. I also understand how destructive they can be to crops and flower gardens. BUT....they are one of the most beautiful creatures on the earth. There is a large church campground near us which is fenced in. There is a herd of about 20 - 25 feer that 'live' there. During the winter (and sometimes the summer) when food is not pleantiful, we take a bucket of whole corn/protein pellet mix over and spread it in a known deer path. The next time we go over, there is no trace that we left food 2 days earlier. It is a costly proposition for us but when we see them eating the food we left, it is all worth every penny. stupak

sweetolbob
07-11-2011, 09:50 AM
All deer lovers: A hunter friend of mine explained to me one time why deer must be hunted and 'thined'. I guess I understand the reasoning BUT I would never kill a deer. I also understand how destructive they can be to crops and flower gardens. BUT....they are one of the most beautiful creatures on the earth. There is a large church campground near us which is fenced in. There is a herd of about 20 - 25 feer that 'live' there. During the winter (and sometimes the summer) when food is not pleantiful, we take a bucket of whole corn/protein pellet mix over and spread it in a known deer path. The next time we go over, there is no trace that we left food 2 days earlier. It is a costly proposition for us but when we see them eating the food we left, it is all worth every penny. stupak

That is until you see a full grown doe going across your hood at 70 MPH as I did last thursday AM in Northern Michigan. Luckily, I was on the brakes hard when she got to my lane and I cut her legs out with the front plastic bumper and she cleared the hood leaving a couple of sets of hoof marks in the plastic but nothing serious. Well, other than needing clean shorts.

There are 60,000+ deer/car collisions annually in Michigan and several deaths due to them. I think thinning the herd is critical and they taste so darn good also. Cute is fine but that should never be a reason to support over-population and the resulting carnage. I spend a week every fall doing my part.

Bob

53k
07-11-2011, 11:52 AM
I was driving my old truck down a dirt road with G-Son Joshua riding shotgun. I saw a tiny Fawn step into the road.
I locked the brakes down and plowed some extra ruts into the road but came to a stop just beyond the little fellow. Josh said" I think we ran over him, Papa."
We got out, went back to see about it and found a still little body lying beside our tracks. Josh ,with tears in his eyes, picked it up. Suddenly he exclaimed "He's alive Papa!" I still didn't have much hope for it but as Joshua held it and stroked it , the deer began to come around. Grand daughter Ashton had recently found one and brought it home. It went to my sons house for awhile before being sent to a wildlife rehab facility, so I called him. We heard somthing moving in the bushes near the roadside and assumed it was the mama. We were near James' house so he came to assist.
By the time James got to us the deer seemed to have made a full recovery. The only thing I can figure is the deer must have run into the wheel on the truck and was knock out cold.
James said the doe was probably nearby and if we released the baby, she would come to it. Josh placed it on the ground. Her legs were still wobbly, but she gained her footing soon andwalked into some under brush and laid down. Practically dissapearing into her surroundings. We fired up the old truck, found 1st gear and headed home. James turned his 51 Starlight around went his way.
Just before dark James went back to check on her and said she was gone. Hopefully Mama came back for the little one. These babies are ruining my appitite For venison.
Hopefully pictures will be added soon Thanks to Deepnhock.

Unfortunately, when the doe smells humans on a fawn, they will usually abandon it.
Probably nearly 30 years ago my older son was mowing and saw dogs chase and catch a fawn. They were about to tear it apart so he rescued it and brought it to the house. The wife adopted it. We learned a lot about deer nutrition. Regular cow's milk won't work so , at the suggestion of an 80-year old neighbor who had lived here all his life, we bought some sort of a supplement at the local Southern States (farm co-op) store and succeeded in keeping it alive. We eventually put it/her in the chicken house and had a little fenced yard where she could come out. One day a walnut fell on the tin roof and she was out of the shed and over the five-foot fence in something near a second. She didn't run away though and we just left her out from then on. She was very playful- would play hide and seek and running games. But she was klutzy- ran in to a barbed wire fence and tore a chunk out of her ear- made it easy to spot her when she visited periodically. One day a year or so later she showed up with two babies of her own, kind of like showing them to us. Never saw her again after that.

stupak
07-11-2011, 01:32 PM
Bob: Yeah....I missed mentioning the 'road factor'. Fortunately (knock on wood) I have never hit a deer in my 56 years of driving. Had two close calls, both at very slow speed with no impact. They can really do damage when hit at speed. Thank God you were not injured. Can't say that for the car I suppose? I won't say anything about you 'doing your part. I'll just think I didn't read that! stupak

mbstude
07-11-2011, 01:43 PM
The first and last deer I killed was taken out with a Stude. At least Rick Kamen made light of the situation.

http://i280.photobucket.com/albums/kk179/1959S2D/kamen-1.jpg

rockinhawk
07-11-2011, 02:35 PM
I fully understand the nuicence problem. I have hit 3 with my old Dodge truck. It's a 4x4 and sits high also has a big winch mounting plate on it so damage was minimal. To the truck that is, the deer were totaled out. My son had his Jeep T-Boned by a deer .Daughter had severe damage to a Pontiac because of a 7 point buck. Wife hit one with a Chrysler.$2000. damage. Several of those went into the freezer. (road kill is good) Son also wrecked a" Lil Red Express" trying to avoid one. Have never hit one with a Studebaker, but had one jump over the hood of the GT.
I am also a deer hunter though mostly retired now. The cute factor of the babies get to me, but so do baby calves and little pigs. But I still enjoy bacon,baked ham,a good sirloin, and stop by Burger King on a regular basis.

But we did feel good that we left this one alive and well. NT

pdrnec
07-11-2011, 02:40 PM
A few years back in northern Wisconsin. I saw a young buck and called out 'hey deer'. This is what happened.


http://youtu.be/vOGPXp5dVSM

55coupe
07-11-2011, 03:15 PM
Maybe 20-25yrs ago I read a pamphlet put out by Dept. of something Bamby Kills it was meant to warn people that more deaths occur from deer than bear, many more . So look at them enjoy them but watch out for thoes horns.

Bob Andrews
07-11-2011, 03:21 PM
For the last month or so I've had two rather big does wandring around my side lot, an unmowed clearing at the back edge of my lawn. I was surprised to see that they had absolutely no fear of my big, noisy Grasshopper mower. I thought maybe they had fawns nearby but never saw any. About the third time I shut off the mower and decided to see how close they'd let me get. The distance was just about exactly 8 feet or so. Any closer they'd take a leisurely step back to that 8 feet and just calmly go back to grazing. They never seemed bothered by me in the slightest, just not quite willing to let me touch them.

In my backyard I have a turkey raising seven chicks. She is skittish but won't leave the babies, just nervously call and pace when I'm out there. I could easily scoop up a chick and pet it if I wanted, but am afraid she might reject it.

I wonder if they can somehow sense that I have never hunted, and could never shoot a living thing that's not endangering my life. When I was growing up my family raised pigs, and I could help with the slaughter- after someone else killed them. I have zero problems with hunters, it's just not for me.

'Course, the deer are extra-safe anyway; I do not like venison at all. But I find most any other killed animal rather tasty:)

jbwhttail
07-11-2011, 03:29 PM
As an avid deer hunter (see my screen name) I hunt deer for the meat and antlers. I enjoy watching them year round and agree God gave us a beautiful game animal to enjoy, alive and on the table, nothing better than a bacon wrapped deer steak!

For those who may not be aware there are two critical times a year to be on the look out for deer on or near roads. the first is June 15-July 15, this is fawning time and females are moving at all times near their fawns. Twin fawns are seperated at birth so predators can't get both fawns. The second time is from October 25 thru Thanksgiving as this is the breeding season and bucks are chasing every female deer they come across hoping the doe is in season.

If you come accross a fawn leave it alone! The doe is not far away and she is VERY protective, people have been injured because a doe protected her offspring. Thier hooves can do serious damage to a human. Human scent on a fawn will not cause the doe to abandon, it is an old wives tale. Recently in Bloomington Indiana a homeowner watched as a doe stomped his dog to death as there was a fawn hidden in a flower bed at his house. Just a week ago a friend called to tell me he had watched a doe kill a fox that got too close to her bedded fawn in an open field, leave the fawn you find alone, it is not abandoned.

We are going to hit a few, be careful during the critical times each year, grill em up.........that's what God gave them to us for.

satdoc2
07-11-2011, 04:07 PM
Deer hunting brought me to Uvalde, TX in 1964. I have killed a number of deer since then. Have hit several. In fact I have venison in ny freezer now. No, it's not Sally. I don't think I could enjoy eating her.
Allen