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mjeansonne
05-13-2007, 07:50 PM
I have a 1963 Champ Pickup, 8E - T4 cab. I am needing to put the front fenders (or cap) back on the truck. The very bottom nuts on each side of the truck, inside the kick panel area spin freely. I removed the kick panel and tried to see if I could see where these nuts are attached, but no luck... I couldn't see them. Any suggestions as to what to do to fasten the bottom part of the fenders to the rest of the body?? I'm thinking seriously of using a lag bolt!! HELP!!


Laisez le bon temps roulez avec un Studebaker

rockne10
05-14-2007, 08:58 PM
In the old days these would be caged nuts, loosely suspended in a tiny box that was welded to the inside of the sheetmetal and not the least bit accessible. In the Champ, and most all vehicles of the period, the nuts are welded in place before assembly and are still totally inaccessible. Once that weld breaks you need to find a way to get the old threads out and position a new nut and securely attach it.

Without seeing what you've got, it's hard to make suggestions. Not an insurmountable problem but one that will require some thought, probably some cutting and definitely some welding.

Brad Johnson
Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
http://www.4wheelz.net/virtual/images/rockne/1928_rockne03_f820_th.jpg'33 Rockne 10, '51 Commander Starlight, '53 Commander Starlight

mjeansonne
05-14-2007, 10:55 PM
Yes, caged nuts, I couldn't think how to descibe them!! They also allow for some movement, so positioning the bolt is not critical. A lag bolt is starting to sound about the only choice. Thanks for your thoughts though.


Laisez le bon temps roulez avec un Studebaker

rockne10
05-14-2007, 11:47 PM
I would check with your favorite body shop. Perhaps they could be drilled out and replaced with nutserts. These are commonly used to install rear view mirrors on trucks. It's a simple operation requiring a simple tool that looks like a rivet gun. It installs a threaded plug in to the sheetmetal.

gordr
05-15-2007, 12:02 AM
quote:Originally posted by mjeansonne

Yes, caged nuts, I couldn't think how to descibe them!! They also allow for some movement, so positioning the bolt is not critical. A lag bolt is starting to sound about the only choice. Thanks for your thoughts though.


Laisez le bon temps roulez avec un Studebaker


Aaargh! Don't use a lag bolt!

Do you have welding equipment? Yes or no, there's an easy repair. Use a hammer and punch, and knock the old cage nut into the depths of the "A" pillar. You may be able to fish it out from the inside with a magnet. Cut a strip of 1/2" band iron about 1 1/2" long, and drill an 11/32" hole dead center in it. Drill a 3/16" hole 1/4" in from each end. That should place the small holes exactly 1" apart, and each should be 1/2" from the center of the center hole. If your small holes wind up being not dead-on, make sure you measure where they ARE at!

Next, get a 5/16 - 18 nut, and use a short bolt to assemble it to the center hole on your metal strip. Try to get the bolt dead-center in the hole so the threads won't drag against the sides of the hole. Now weld the NUT securely to the metal strip; several good beads, not just tacks! Let it cool, and unscrew the bolt. If it binds against the side of the hole, use a 3/8" drill and counterbore the metal strip to make a bigger clearance hole for the bolt. No biggie.

OK, now you have just built a captive nut. Take a file, and open up the hole in the door pillar enough that you can slip the captive nut in endways. Don't lose it! Then drill a pair of 3/16" holes to match those in the captive nut. Thread a strong string or haywire through the threaded hole in you captive nut, so you can push it through the hole in the door pillar, and then pull it up tight against the inside of the hole. Then take a pop riveter, and install two 3/16" pop rivets to retain the captive nut. Hint: just halfways set the first rivet, so you can shift the captive nut a bit to line up the holes to insert the second rivet. Then snug up both rivets.

If you have a MIG welder, you can dispense with the pop rivets and 3/16" holes in the captive nut, and just make plug welds through the pair of 3/16" holes you drill in the door pillar. If you don't have a welder, drill the holes, and take your captive nut(s) in to a body shop to have them welded. It's really trivial welding job, if you have it set up ready to go.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands