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View Full Version : Progress this weekend



wdills
02-27-2011, 07:28 PM
Made some progress this weekend that didn't end with a new problem (yet)

Installed the heads and valve train. It is starting to look like an engine again.
http://i457.photobucket.com/albums/qq298/wdills/DSCN1738.jpg

Finished installing all the seals in the differential and got it back under the car ready to be mounted.
http://i457.photobucket.com/albums/qq298/wdills/DSCN1740.jpg

Thanks to everyone for the tips, pointers and advice.

Wayne

woodysrods
02-28-2011, 02:54 AM
Wayne
What all have you done this motor? Is it a complete rebuild? And how much will you in this motor when it is ready to fire?
Just asking because my wife good runner is sitting on the floor ready to detail and take a chance, or open it up and start spending the money???
Good Roads
Brian

wdills
02-28-2011, 09:23 AM
It ended up being a complete rebuild. Didn't start out that way, but the farther I went the more problems I found. I have spent about $1500 on parts and about $800 on machine work. I did the tear down and assembly myself.

I originally opened this engine up because it had a knock. Other than that it ran great, no smoke and good compression. I was hoping to just turn the crank, and do a minor overhaul with bearings and rings. Once I got into it, I found the crank was so bad that it couldn't be turned, so I had to find another one. The bores were just slightly over the recommended limit so I had the block bored. I took the heads to the machine shop to have positive valve stem seals installed and discovered that the valves had been turned previously and didn't have enough thickness left to turn again so we replaced all the head parts. I discovered a chipped tooth on the cam and I screwed up by not keeping up with which lifter came out of which hole, so that turned into a reground cam and a new set of lifters.

I guess my point is, once you open it up there is no telling what you may find, even in a good running engine. If this one hadn't had a knock in #6 cylinder I would have never opened it up and some of the other stuff I found would have probably bit me in the a$$ at some point in the future.

Good luck with yours.
Wayne

Charlie D
02-28-2011, 09:41 PM
Wayne,

I have been following your threads for quite awhile now. I am in the process of rebuilding my first Studebaker engine and running a couple of months behind you in the process. I let the machinist know about the size of the 30 over pistons. He said he wouldn’t bore to size anyway until he had pistons in hand. Did you end up going to 40 over? Did the machine shop cut you any slack? How did the hard to turn cam situation turn out? All of us are pulling for you and your forum questions are being fielded by very good engine guys and being followed closely by many of us. Especially those of us who may not have to ask the same questions for the same situations you are going through.

Charlie D.

woodysrods
03-01-2011, 12:39 AM
It ended up being a complete rebuild. Didn't start out that way, but the farther I went the more problems I found. I have spent about $1500 on parts and about $800 on machine work. I did the tear down and assembly myself.

I originally opened this engine up because it had a knock. Other than that it ran great, no smoke and good compression. I was hoping to just turn the crank, and do a minor overhaul with bearings and rings. Once I got into it, I found the crank was so bad that it couldn't be turned, so I had to find another one. The bores were just slightly over the recommended limit so I had the block bored. I took the heads to the machine shop to have positive valve stem seals installed and discovered that the valves had been turned previously and didn't have enough thickness left to turn again so we replaced all the head parts. I discovered a chipped tooth on the cam and I screwed up by not keeping up with which lifter came out of which hole, so that turned into a reground cam and a new set of lifters.

I guess my point is, once you open it up there is no telling what you may find, even in a good running engine. If this one hadn't had a knock in #6 cylinder I would have never opened it up and some of the other stuff I found would have probably bit me in the a$$ at some point in the future.

Good luck with yours.
Wayne
Thanks Wayne
Your prices do not sound out of line. And your comments are not unexpected.
Opened up the six cylinder once while I was visiting inlaws (I was bored and looking for something to do) Car had been smoking so thought I would just throw in a new set of rings. It was a 47 Plymouth coupe. Once it was all apart I discovered it was an American engine that was not the same in any way from the Canadian version, and the rings I needed were not quite so readily available in the town I was in or any other nearby city. Ended up trailering the car home, and buying a rebuilt motor from our local machine shop that kept them in stock for a local Concrete company that used them on their cement mixers.
Not only did it wreck the rest of my holiday , but it taught me some valuable lessons about life and cars.
Good Roads
Brian

wdills
03-01-2011, 12:26 PM
Charlie,
I did end up going to .040 over on the pistons. The machine shop did not charge me to bore the second time because it was sort of his fault for boring before the pistons came in.

The tight turning cam was a strange situation. When I carried the block back to the machine shop, he quickly confirmed that the problem was in the cam bearing at the front of the engine, but he couldn't find anything wrong with it. He pulled it back out and it measured fine. It turned out that the hole in the block that the bearing pressed into was slightly tapered from front to back. In other words the diameter at the front side of the bearing was the correct size but the diameter at the back side of the bearing was a little small. He never said how much. He machined the block to get rid of that taper and we installed a new bearing. That fixed the problem.

Good luck with your build.

Wayne