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DWard
05-09-2007, 11:13 AM
Hello Everyone!

I'm constantly thinking of ways restore my Hawk. There is an outfit in Cincinnati that you can hire to help stip & clean car parts. They have a dipping process that supposedly stips and cleans the metal (not acid--more like lye soap I'm told). They also clean and derust in an oven at 800 degrees. They tell me this does not warp the metal. I've heard of the acid and lye dipping but I am not familiar with this oven cleaning. It scares me to think about heating a car fender (or other similar part)up to 800 degrees. I am looking at different options to try and shave some time off my restoration project. Does anyone have experience with this heating process? Also, do you have opinions on this or the lye soap or the acid dipping as well. Thanks in advance. Regards Dan Ward

DEEPNHOCK
05-09-2007, 11:59 AM
Shortcuts that involve outside suppliers equate to money vs. time.
Stripping a body tub is a great idea.
Stripping a Studebaker is like going to Las Vegas..
(You may end up coming home with nothing[:0]...)
But taking a car down to the bare bones is the most time inclusive restoration/repair possible.
So, if you are saying you want to save time, yet want to strip it to the bare body... That's an oxymoron.
Most dipping places want to heat up the dipped part(s) to dry them off so corrosion won't start up again. They usually spray a sealer of some sort on. Sounds like your dip shop also does powder coat, from the temps he's tossing at you...
Ask him for referrals from people who have finished their cars...
See what they say.
Jeff[8D]



quote:Originally posted by DWard

Hello Everyone!

I'm constantly thinking of ways restore my Hawk. There is an outfit in Cincinnati that you can hire to help stip & clean car parts. They have a dipping process that supposedly stips and cleans the metal (not acid--more like lye soap I'm told). They also clean and derust in an oven at 800 degrees. They tell me this does not warp the metal. I've heard of the acid and lye dipping but I am not familiar with this oven cleaning. It scares me to think about heating a car fender (or other similar part)up to 800 degrees. I am looking at different options to try and shave some time off my restoration project. Does anyone have experience with this heating process? Also, do you have opinions on this or the lye soap or the acid dipping as well. Thanks in advance. Regards Dan Ward


http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j54/deepnhock/Jeff%20Rice%20Studebaker%20Pictures/1937StudebakerCoupeExpressJeffRicee.jpg

DEEPNHOCK at Gmail.com
Brooklet, Georgia
'37 Coupe Express (never ending project)
'37 Coupe Express Trailer (project)
'61 Hawk (project)
http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

JDP
05-09-2007, 10:47 PM
Maybe you can find a guy like this near you. he blasts with baking soda. You can leave the glass and rubber in the car. About $700-$1000 to do a entire car.


http://www.chesapeakesodaclean.com/cscauto.htm

JDP/Maryland


63 GT R2
63 Avanti R1
63 Daytona convert-63
63 Lark 2 door
62 Lark 2 door
60 Lark HT-60Hawk
59 3E truck
52 & 53 Starliner
51 Commander

DWard
05-10-2007, 09:21 AM
The baking soda sounds interesting--I'll check around my area. Another thought is....maybe I could do it myself---Thanks for your input! Dan Ward

Swifster
05-10-2007, 11:38 AM
Dan, it can take a bit of experience to make sure that the sheet metal doesn't warp. Be very careful. I find that some form of blasting has it's drawbacks as does the dipping process.

In blasting, as mentioned, there is the posibility of warping the metal. Another issue is the ability to get into the dark recesses that the blasting tip doesn't get into. A car with any appreciable amount of rust will still have the rust that can't be reached.

Dipping goes to the other extreme. It will remove every bit of rust and in some cases, leave metal paper thin in areas of high rust. Those little nooks and crannies will no longer have rust, but now the owner, painter, etc., has to try and cover the bare metal in these areas. Along with this, there have been cars where paint jobs have been ruined when the dip has seeped from the seams after the car has been painted, removing the paint (and anything else) that the dip touches. That oven that was mentioned is to dry out the dip.

There are a few places that have the ability to e-coat the metal after the dip process. This involves having the part cleaned of the dip, and then have the coating electrically applied much as the original process was done. Of course this isn't cheap either.



---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tom - Valrico, FL

1964 Studebaker Daytona

http://i74.photobucket.com/albums/i280/Swifster/1965_Studebaker_Commander_front198x.jpg

JDP
05-10-2007, 12:07 PM
Soda blasting will not warp the metal, it won't even hurt the chrome or glass. It's takes longer to strip a car (4 hours or more) but it's very gentle.

JDP/Maryland


63 GT R2
63 Avanti R1
63 Daytona convert-63
63 Lark 2 door
62 Lark 2 door
60 Lark HT-60Hawk
59 3E truck
52 & 53 Starliner
51 Commander

BShaw
05-10-2007, 05:05 PM
For Soda Blasting near you, DWard, check out Painters Lane in Fairfield and their connection with Advanced Stripping Technologies.
http://www.painterslane.com/Stripping%20and%20Blasting.htm

Also check out industrial cleaning companies that offer mobile soda blasting for building, bridges, etc...they might do cars on the side.

One nice thing about soda blasting is that a mobile service can do it in right at your location (nice if you don't own a trailer). Plus, soda is non-toxic and biodegradable.

BShaw,Webmaster
http://i61.photobucket.com/albums/h53/StudeRobert/StudeWebService-small.gif
60 Hawk. 49 2R5, 39 Champion
Woodbury, Minnesota