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studebaker-R2-4-me
05-07-2007, 10:23 AM
I spent hours on Friday night getting the Hawk back on the road. I was a long winter perched up on stands. I've installed Flanged axles, Traction bars,return fuel line, lined gas tank, repaired a rust hole under the gas tank, rear brake lines, rear sway bar, Silvertone 2 1/4" SS exhaust, and a JVC stereo with amplified speakers

While cruising around on Sunday the Hawk died. The battery was dead. I replace the battery and she fired up and I got the hawk back in the garage.

This morning I took the alternator down to the local rewind shop and it is putting out 35 Amps. Best news of the day. I suppose am left with a bad battery which is a Year old or the regulator.

I doubt the stereo system is drawing more than the alternator is able to charge the battery. I did have this same Amplifier in my 64 Lark years ago with a prestolite 35 Amp alternator with no troubles.

I did notice that the Amp gauge was charging so I was suprised with the dead battery.

Does this sound like a regulator problem?




1964 GT Hawk soon to be R2 Clone

curt
05-07-2007, 10:55 AM
I have known batteries to charge heavy when they are going bad. Does the old battery hold a charge? Check the specific gravity of the old battery with a full charge, then check the SP in 24 hours. A good battery will show all cells still equal and at full charge in 24 hours.

studegary
05-07-2007, 02:18 PM
I had an AutoZone Gold battery go completely bad after 17 months of almost no use. I had a hard time believing that the battery was bad. I tried charging it, cleaned all connections, checked all cables & grounds, etc. I finally took the battery to an AutoZone. The guy said that it just needs a charge. He took into the rear of the store and a little while later some guy comes out of the back and asked who had the battery back there. The net is that they gave me a brand new Gold battery for no charge at all. I haven't tried it this Spring to see how the new one survived the Winter. My truck is in my temperature controled garage and the battery is disconnected most of the time. I guess the net of this is that batteries can go bad in short order.

Gary L.
Wappinger, NY

1959 DeLuxe pickup (restomod)

curt
05-07-2007, 04:45 PM
I lost the battery on my stude, Wall Mart about 20 months old, still under guarantee, they gave me a new one. I do try to keep the a charge on the stoerd car's battery, I let this one go too long(?) between charges or what ever.

studebaker-R2-4-me
05-07-2007, 07:31 PM
Well the battery is one year old and no good. The charging machine at the local FLAPS told the whole story "it's no good"

I bought a new Champion battery and have a warranty in the glove box for 18 months. Look like I'm good for a season and a half.

Allen

1964 GT Hawk soon to be R2 Clone

John Kirchhoff
05-07-2007, 10:30 PM
Yep, I had a Champion battery less than a year old that I felt was going bad. Took it back to Wal Mart, the guy hooked it up to his $1,000 testing machine (he seemed awful proud of that thing) and said it was fine. I disagreed, they wouldn't do anything, so I told him I'd be back sooner or later. A couple of months later I was back with a permanently dead battery that he had to exchange. That sure didn't compensate me for all the times I had to use jumper cables though. He remembered me and while I never try to tell someone "I told you so", that was one time I just had to.

When having an alternator tested, keep in mind that a bad diode can have no effect of charging, but after shutting the engine off, it will let the juice drain out through the alternator to the ground (battery ground that is). They'll usually go dead overnight. If that's what you suspect, run it, remove the battery cable or the big wire on the alternator, let it set overnight or for a day and then see what happens. If it cranks over enthusastically, it's the alternator. If it gets deader the longer it sets, then it's the battery for sure.

studebaker-R2-4-me
05-14-2007, 10:54 AM
I've got no luck, another DEAD BATTERY and what appears to be a tedious wiring problem. I just threw my Fluke meter on battery post and the positive lead to the solenoid and found 12 volts. There is no key in the ignition, no lights on,the radio is shut off, I do not have a underhood or trunk light. I am going to start by pulling the few fuses under the dash and confirm what system is carrying the voltage to the frame.
I have also disconnected the Alternator so it is not draining through a diode.

Does the forum have any other suggestions?

Allen



1964 GT Hawk soon to be R2 Clone

Dwain G.
05-14-2007, 11:59 AM
If you read 12 volts that doesn't sound like the battery is discharged? Are you saying that you removed the positive cable from the battery and connected the meter between the post and the cable?

http://home.comcast.net/~jdwain/63.63.jpg
Dwain G.

JDP
05-14-2007, 12:45 PM
Remove the positive lead from the battery, hook the Fluke (set for current)in series withe the battery post and the positive cable and see how many milliamps it's drawing with nothing on. (should be very close to zero )

JDP/Maryland


63 GT R2
63 Avanti R1
63 Daytona convert-63
63 Lark 2 door
62 Lark 2 door
60 Lark HT-60Hawk
59 3E truck
58 Starlight
52 & 53 Starliner
51 Commander

John Kirchhoff
05-14-2007, 01:14 PM
You're going to see voltage at the battery side of the solenoid all the time. The only time you should see juice on the starter side is when it's engaged. Multimeters draw so little current that the reading can be deceiving. A battery can have what's called a surface charge and will show the appropriate voltage reading. Hit the starter and with a good battery, the voltage reading will drop. With the starter engaged, around 11.5 volts is pretty much normal. With a bad battery, it'll drop considerably more, to less than 10 volts.

Just for grins, feel of the starter solenoid or headlight relay to see if it's warm. Over the weekend I found a bad relay on my bike that was hot to the touch....and the bike hadn't been run in half a day! The previous owner had let water get into it and it was very rusty. Since it was warm (actually it was hot!), that means current was flowing though it at considerable resistance, I want to open it up to see just what was going on.

Do as JDP suggested and it you see current draw, start disconnecting things to see where it's going. Since you say that orginally you were driving it, it died with a dead battery, you replaced it and it started. I'd still suspect the alternator, voltage regulator or the wires going to it. Make sure the field wire is connected to a switched circuit...in other words, one that is dead when you have the key turned off but energized when turned in.

gordr
05-14-2007, 02:12 PM
quote:Originally posted by studebaker-R2-4-me

I've got no luck, another DEAD BATTERY and what appears to be a tedious wiring problem. I just threw my Fluke meter on battery post and the positive lead to the solenoid and found 12 volts. There is no key in the ignition, no lights on,the radio is shut off, I do not have a underhood or trunk light. I am going to start by pulling the few fuses under the dash and confirm what system is carrying the voltage to the frame.
I have also disconnected the Alternator so it is not draining through a diode.

Does the forum have any other suggestions?

Allen





1964 GT Hawk soon to be R2 Clone


Allen, did I read you as saying you see 12 volts BETWEEN the positive post of the battery and the hot lead to the solenoid? If so, then you have either a very dirty connection on the terminal post, or the positive battery cable is bad. The expected reading between those two points would be ZERO at all time other than while cranking, when a voltage drop of a few tenths of a volt would be normal.

I'd second John's warning about using the Fluke meter. Modern meters are so sensitive on the "volts" setting that they will read normal voltage through a resistance so high that it qualifies as an open circuit in 12 volt work.

What you could do is get a 47 ohm, 5 watt resistor, and use it to shunt the meter leads when testing voltage on 12 volt lines. That will draw about about 0.25 amp on 12 volts, and any GOOD circuit in the car should support a quarter-amp load without showing any voltage drop. A flaky circuit, OTOH, might show a substantial drop.

Also, do your basics: make sure all connecting cables to the battery are clean, not corroded, and making good contact at BOTH ends. Negative cable should NOT go to an exhaust manifold bolt. Also ensure that the body ground wire, a short length of #10 wire bridging across the right-hand front engine mount is present and securely attached at both ends.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

John Kirchhoff
05-14-2007, 03:48 PM
Eating lunch gave me time to think. While you have your handy dandy volt meter in hand, fire the car up and check the voltage at the battery. At idle it'll probably be around 12-12.5 volts without the lights, heater and such being on. Speed the engine up (moderate rpm, not full tilt) and the voltage should go up to something like 13.7-14.5 volts. Try the same with the lights and heater on and it should still get up to about the same voltage. I'd think the shop would have checked the voltage, but you never know. The reason I say to check the voltage is because I've had a field coil go bad and while it'll still charge amperage, the voltage wasn't adequate which resulted in a battery that never got more than 25% charged.