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jclary
11-08-2010, 09:04 AM
THE STUDEBAKER PERSONALITY?

This subject has danced and pranced through my mind for years. I bought my first Studebaker over 35 years ago. My motivation for buying it had nothing to do with the fact that it was a Studebaker. My reasoning was that I wanted a truck, this one was available, and, in my mind, was the best deal I could find. However, as I proudly began to expose my newly acquired truck to friends and relatives, I was greeted with comments like “you can’t get parts”, “that’s ugly” or “why would you want that?”

Instead of being discouraged by the negative comments, my rebellious side kicked in and I saw it as an opportunity to set myself apart in a “sea of sameness.” After driving the truck to my office for a couple of months a Studebaker Club member contacted me and wanted to buy it. When I told him I wanted to keep it, he invited me to join the Studebaker Drivers Club. I have been a member ever since. It wasn’t long until I had begun to clean the little truck up, attended a few club meets, bought a hubcap to replace the missing one, and installed the missing cardboard headliner.

At an early charity car show, I had a participant come up to me and ask, “Why would you want to mess with a Studebaker?” My reply was “because everything else is kinda ordinary.” It was that exchange that motivated me to create my “Fight back” saying…”Studebaker…anything else is too common.” In the past, I have had patches and ball caps printed with that slogan, but I am sold out for now.

Everyone should know that making broad “Generalizations” about a group of people is often unfair, potentially controversial, and sometimes unleashes a can of prickly stinging worms. However, after many years of negotiating through the Studebaker crowd and being a dues paying member, I have come to the conclusion that there is a common personality characteristic beyond the fact that we are Studebaker fans. Regardless of our social and economic status, there is a common trait we all seem to share. I think the traits are not unique to Studebaker folks, but to the fans of Packard, Nash, Hudson, or any make you name whose legacy has faded with the passage of time.

I have my conclusions on the subject, but thought I would see what yours is. What are your thoughts of the common traits that makes us different? What sets us apart from the “me too crowd?” :):cool::)

sweetolbob
11-08-2010, 09:53 AM
Posted by jclary
I have my conclusions on the subject, but thought I would see what yours is. What are your thoughts of the common traits that makes us different? What sets us apart from the “me too crowd?”

John

I guess what you are suggesting that we Stude guys are just Rat Rodders with an adversion to tattoos.:o:rolleyes:

Seriously, to answer you query, My involvement to Studebaker did not start with any knowledge of the marque nor any relationship with anyone employed by the corporation.

My involvement started in my youth (16) when I saw my first 53 hardtop and thought it was the best looking car in the world. It took a lot of years to afford it and my second love the Avanti. I never had a drive to be different but to build and drive what I liked.

That led me to Healey 3000's, Fiat 850's, 72 Bronco's for offroading, Spitfire gt-6's and a few street rods like my 39 Ford Standard coupe.

Not a need to be different just a desire to drive what I like, in spite of what others liked.

Bob

PackardV8
11-08-2010, 10:03 AM
I'd say an inability to learn from experience. Ben Franklin defined insanity as doing the same thing over and over again, always expecting a different result.

jack vines

oldguy
11-08-2010, 10:08 AM
I'm with Bob. Was not a studebaker fan. Just fell in love with the 53 styling. All the other reasons and emotions mentioned came with time, involvement and appreciation. NOW I'm a stude nut.

Bullet
11-08-2010, 01:23 PM
I always walked to a different drummer and did not like to follow the crowd in high school, when '68 Chevelle hardtops were the rage here in Calif. When I graduated from College in OR, I saw a salmon pink '50 Starlight from the back and it was love at first site. I bought my car, a different one, but still salmon colored, two months later and still have it. Although now it is '57 Chevy Blue, because of the movie, Stand By Me. Still love the car.

And daring to be different!

Mark

8E45E
11-08-2010, 01:35 PM
However, as I proudly began to expose my newly acquired truck to friends and relatives, I was greeted with comments like “you can’t get parts”, “that’s ugly” or “why would you want that?”


Rather interesting thread, and it will only possibly make sense to those who have owned one for over 30 years when a lot of them were considered 'cheap used cars'. In the '70's, I had the same stigma of being asked where I could get parts on a fairly regular basis. Studebaker never really made a 'bad' car that had notoriety like a Chevy Vegrant, which had an inherently bad design/engineerig flaw. True, the OHV six got some negative press, but many have driven them thousands of miles without letup. My mom had a '50 Champion when I was a kid, and she spoke highly of that car. It made me want one when I got to driving age as I remembered the Larks/Lark-types when they were brand new, which I did, a '64 Daytona sedan.

Craig

Sdude
11-08-2010, 02:32 PM
Studebakers ARE different. I love going to generic car shows and having the only Studebaker(s) there.

I also just happened to buy a Studebaker when I was looking for an old car. When I got involved in the club and with the people, I too became hooked on Studes.

I like the new advertising campign that "Studebaker Invented COOL". I believe that to be true and am sure glad I didn't buy something that would put me in the crowd of sameness that permeates most car shows.

I get off on being different and I always did. Being the "Studebaker Dude" is my new identity and I wear it with pride.

Chris Pile
11-08-2010, 02:58 PM
I just got tired of the same old Ford and Chevy stuff, and since I feel like I am different - I went for different.
When my Blue Oval and Bowtie pals give me grief for my choice, I tell them I bought a Stude so I didn't have to fool with Ford and Chevy BS all the time.

I love the attention driving something different brings my way.

One year my nephew wanted to me to attend a show with him and his Dad.
So there we were, my '49 Champion, my brother's '99 Vette, and my nephews '70 Charger.
Guess who got all the attention? My nephew was upset! My brother just laughed - he knew the score.

stall
11-08-2010, 03:31 PM
I own and love a Studebaker for its beauty but also for its great "different" factor. The following is from one of my writings and i think it defines the challenge a prospective Studebaker owner in the mid-fifties.

By 1955 one’s Father might be considering the purchase of a new car and had winnowed the choice down to a Studebaker Champion or a Chevrolet BelAir. His research would show that he could buy the BelAir fully “loaded” and sporting a V-8 instead of the Stude’s flathead 6 and have money left over. He would know from his friends that the Studebaker trade-in value in 3 years would be half of the Chevy’s. As he read his Sunday paper he might note that Kaiser, Willys and Hudson were on the financial ropes and Studebaker was no longer profitable.

On top of all this was the common old perception that Studebaker made cars for old people only interested in economy for Studebaker had never decided whether to tout stingy economy or elegance. You only had to look at Stude ads to sense the stodgy image. A “reasonable man” would probably deduce that buying a car noted for economy that was overpriced in relation to its competition made no sense, advantage Chevy again. A “reasonable man” would not buy the Studebaker and they didn’t in sustainable numbers. The “wisdom of crowds” is often cited as mass illusion but by 1955 the facts and perceptions of the buying public had doomed Studebaker and in fact all the Independent car companies.

You don’t have to dive very deeply into psychobabble to see the dilemma of the small car companies. In 1954 Chevy, Ford and Plymouth sold 3.2 million cars to Studebaker’s 161,521. That essentially meant that you would have 20 neighbors with a Chevy, Ford or Plymouth before you found another Studebaker. By definition you were an outsider with a minority opinion.

The human condition values conformance and buying a Studebaker or Nash et-al Independent branded you an outsider. It’s trite but “go along to get along” was a factor that determined many automobile buying decisions. If you purchased the type of cars your neighbor’s drove you were automatically validated, one of the gang, a regular guy. To be sure some cars thrive on different and quirky, think Porsche or even Jeep but they remained true to their niche reputations and didn’t suffer through a severely flawed product launch. Studebaker never developed a niche place in the market where they could prosper; instead they tried to compete with GM across the board on GMs terms. A “reasonable man” would think that to be silly.

raprice
11-08-2010, 05:14 PM
I guess I've always marched to the beat of a different drummer. When I was young, my friends were into Fords, Chevies and Mopars, but I had a Studebaker. I wasn't kidded about it though. My love of Studes goes back to the late '50s and continues to this day. When I go to a cruise night, I'm usually the only Studebaker there, but it's interesting to watch the people looking at the cars. They almost always stop to look my Lark over and ask questions about it. It pays to stand out in the crowd.
Rog

Bob Andrews
11-08-2010, 05:38 PM
Same here. It's just my nature to not be a sheep and just accept what the crowd thinks. I like something because it strikes a chord with me, and I have no problem enjoying it, regardless of its popularity. When people make fun of my Studes I feed off that for some reason. Head case, I guess;)

FlatheadGeo
11-08-2010, 05:48 PM
Your answer from those that responded and from me is this simple fact: Studebakers are great cars, the company was a mainstay in American history, and I do not like to be part of the crowd. For years while I was a founding member in the LI Studebaker Club I couldn't afford a Studebaker. My daily driver was a 1960 Rambler. That turned a lot of the Studebaker guys against me; but, what the hell? Our founder Harry Barnes had no problem with me attending Studebaker activities with a Rambler. After thirty years and two more Ramblers and a Nash I finally could afford a Studebaker and, yes, the looks and 'what is it' is what sets me apart from the rest. Remember Ben Franklin, et al, were also following the beat of a different drummer! We, as Studebaker drivers and owners are continuing that American legacy which set us apart from the rest of the colonial empire!

stall
11-08-2010, 06:05 PM
I think you said it best, when i go to a cruise in and see 14 or so 55 Chevys I'm so glad that I have my Speedster.


I guess I've always marched to the beat of a different drummer. When I was young, my friends were into Fords, Chevies and Mopars, but I had a Studebaker. I wasn't kidded about it though. My love of Studes goes back to the late '50s and continues to this day. When I go to a cruise night, I'm usually the only Studebaker there, but it's interesting to watch the people looking at the cars. They almost always stop to look my Lark over and ask questions about it. It pays to stand out in the crowd.
Rog

monomaniac
11-08-2010, 06:08 PM
A very interesting thread. When I bought my first Studebaker a co-worker said to me, "When are you going to buy a car?"
I must admit that rebellion kicked in at that point and the more ridiculous comments I heard, the firmer was my convistion that I had made a valid choice. I must have fallen into a groove or rut. That was 42 years ago.
Would anyone here object if some of these quotes appeared in Turning Wheels?

Flashback
11-08-2010, 06:25 PM
What sets us apart from the me too crowd? "STUDEBAKER" is the simple answer. Studebakers are like Harley Davidson
motorcycles, you either lovum or hatum. I rode Harleys since I was old enough for my Dad to hold the bike up and git
me started. I have owned a Studebaker since I was 11. I am now 66, and I don't have to ask what set's us apart. It's just
somethin about the Studebakers and the Harleys. You either have it or you don't. I feel sorry for the one's that don't. I got up
to 33 degree weather Saturday morning, and drove my Studebaker to a car show without the driver's side window and
the quarter windows, (no heater), and I still enjoyed it more than all the brand X cars I have ever driven to shows. I didn't
give up on the Harleys til a gun shot and lung surgery stopped me. I won't give up on the Studebakers til I have to either.
Maybe this is not the answer you are lookin for. If not, I can give you one other answer. Ther are people that thrive on th
"simple things in life" Studebakers are one!!!!!!!!!!!!!

stall
11-08-2010, 06:49 PM
I think all the writings on this thread are valid, I certainly wouldnt mind.

Murray


A very interesting thread. When I bought my first Studebaker a co-worker said to me, "When are you going to buy a car?"
I must admit that rebellion kicked in at that point and the more ridiculous comments I heard, the firmer was my convistion that I had made a valid choice. I must have fallen into a groove or rut. That was 42 years ago.
Would anyone here object if some of these quotes appeared in Turning Wheels?

52-fan
11-08-2010, 07:01 PM
I came for the parts and stayed because of the people. Although my parents had a Studebaker until I was 5 years old and I bought a 59 Lark at age 15 because I could afford it, I had no particular love for Studebakers. I would have gladly bought any make when at the age of 21 I was looking for an old car. It just happened that my sister's mother-in-law had a 52 Champion Starlight Coupe for sale and I bought it. A short time later I joined the SDC mainly to find out about parts. I was invited to attend a tour by the Little Rock Chapter and got hooked on the people. Been in SDC ever since.

jclary
11-08-2010, 07:09 PM
A very interesting thread...Would anyone here object if some of these quotes appeared in Turning Wheels?

I would say…fire away! After all this is a public forum and all who post, do so willingly. :)

I wanted to see some thoughts of others before commenting further as to my observations. Over the years, I have met truly wonderful people associated with Studebakers. I have met not only SDC members, but also former employees of Studebaker, former dealers, and some decedents of the Studebaker family.

My conclusion is that to a man (or woman) we all have an independent streak. We also have a bit of an eccentric characteristic about us. It may not be blatant or in your face obvious, but you know it is true. At one time in my past, some of you were more difficult to like than others, but as time and maturity has chased me down, I realize that most of the problems I encountered with fellow Studebaker fans was because I hadn’t figured out that I had to make peace with the guy I saw in the mirror every morning. Once I learned to accept that guy, the rest sort of fell into place.

Whether the unflappable perseverance of our founder Harry Barnes, the steel trap mind of John Brechetto, or the mischievous wit of Jerry Grundy, the irascible gruffness of Herbert Boykin, and the “every day Joe glad to see ya” spirit of Bob Bourke. The tales that Bob Yale could spin like no one else, and then there was the old gentleman who took me for a terrifying ride in his beater Studebaker Station Wagon in Huntsville Alabama back in 1978. Great guy except for him a stop sign or red light meant “everybody look out!” I Know I have misspelled some of these names but hope I got them phonetically correct. These have passed on but their legacy continues, as has been articulated…”To a tune of a different drummer.” That tune does not necessarily mean it is “out of tune,” but rather the “spice in the soup” or the “ginger in the cookie.”:cool::p:cool:

Milaca
11-08-2010, 09:26 PM
Interesting topic, John. I purchased a 1963 Lark Daytona project when I was 17 because I liked 'oddball' things that others turned their noses up at. Very shortly after I purchased a 1963 Lark sedan which I 'fixed up' and drove to High School, which my uncle repainted for me prior to graduation in 1990. An underpowered four door Lark sedan certainly didnt make me popular, but I didnt care about that. I don't know if I bought Studebaker(s) because I wanted to be different or because I am different, but Studebaker and I will always be together. The older I get, the more I enjoy driving a Studebaker as a feeling of revolt (in a light-hearted sort of way) towards others that drive popular collector cars from the Big Three. Even more so when I drive a Studebaker as daily transportation and pass late model cars, SUV's and trucks on the highway. Perhaps it's a feeling of being told that it's not possible, and proving otherwise? Long live us Studebaker drivers!
My name is Brent and I approve this message. :)

paintim613
11-08-2010, 09:29 PM
Our Stude was brought into my wife's family before she was born and we bought it from her uncle over 7 years ago. While it is a one-of-a-kind Stude, I am now a Stude nut because of owning and restoring it and because of this forum, reading all the fascinating things about Studes I never would have known. In other words, the passion of the 10,000+ members of SDC simply rubbed off on me. The history of the Studebaker car company, including its demise, also would make a great movie. Of course, now knowing that there are rarely Studes at all-brand car shows makes them even more desirable to me. Case in point, we went to a 200+ local car show last Saturday and the most interesting vehicle there to me was a '63 Champ that was for sale. There is something about Studebakers....

tluz
11-08-2010, 09:33 PM
In the words of Monty Python:

CROWD (together, in monotone): "WE ARE ALL INDIVIDUALS."

MAN AT BACK: "I'm not."

woodysrods
11-08-2010, 10:17 PM
There must have been something about that 53 C/K car that made us teenagers fall in love with it. I was 13 (1965) when I saw my first mildly customized 53 and waited years to finally get one.
Brian

Dan Kay
11-08-2010, 10:36 PM
My dad believed in Jeep pickups and Studebakers. I gave my mom a ride in my 61 the other day, and she said," you look like you belong in this car". So there you are.

Edsel G. Tattooer
11-08-2010, 11:05 PM
Studebaker the most punk rock of classic cars!

Coming from an old punk myself If you can consider a 45 year old dude, old, that is.

Turbopackman
11-09-2010, 12:12 AM
" Look, you've got it all wrong! You don't NEED to follow ME, You don't NEED to follow ANYBODY! You've got to think for your selves! You're ALL individuals!"


In the words of Monty Python:

CROWD (together, in monotone): "WE ARE ALL INDIVIDUALS."

MAN AT BACK: "I'm not."

I absolutely LOVE that movie!

barnlark
11-09-2010, 12:14 AM
My family always considered that Studebakers themselves had the personality for them. Our '59 Lark was the first that I remembered being around, early.

http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh48/newshooter44/DSCN0043.jpg

It's sometimes difficult even within this club to answer the questions as to why we chose a certain Studebaker over another that other members might never had considered. That might be the personality...daring to be different among the seriously different!

clonelark
11-09-2010, 05:01 AM
For me it was a Bonneville Coupe that caught my eye. they were so sleek,and fast also. But as i got with the Old Studebaker News Group it was the people. But me i like almost all cars, and Buicks are what i grew up with. My dad was a Buick only person untill his late years.
My first Studebaker was a 1955 Coupe,never finished it, and Joined the local Studebaker club. A guy in our club had this beautiful 1954 LandCruiser and wanted to sell it. It had Air conditioning with the tubes up the rear window, a 64 engine and trans, with a modified Lark steering box. It drove like a new car. so i bought it.
http://i54.tinypic.com/ajuo84.jpg
Then i found this guy at a local swap meet that had a 54 Coupe, he wanted to sell it or trade for a muscle car, I just happened to have a 396 El Camino and we traded straight across. So now i had two Studebakers, I put the LandCruiser up for sale. A guy came over to see it and liked it till he saw the Coupe. He wanted the coupe and had cash. So off went my 54 Coupe and i still had the LandCruiser.
Then one day i went to a Machinery show and saw this guy in a Studebaker shirt, (always pays to wear your Studebaker shirt) any way we ended up trading a two for one deal on the LandCruiser for 2 GT hawks. Well the guy turned out to be Our own Johnny Wiffer.
Well it was time to go to the 2002 South Bend swap meet, I saw this black R2 Lark
http://i52.tinypic.com/18cc44.jpg
I knew it or one simular to it would be my next car to buy.
So anyway i'm hooked on Studebakers and this forum. and i'm glad i am.

FlatheadGeo
11-09-2010, 07:35 AM
Quote and reprint away!!!!

DEEPNHOCK
11-09-2010, 07:54 AM
Boy, do I disagree with you here..
If you are talking about a once prosperous corporation making bad business decisions...yes.
If you are talking about a company that stayed inside it's own corporate boardroom and did nothing while an import invasion happened with better, and newer products...yes.
If you are talking about a corporation that sold itself off to save itself from annhilation...yes.
If you are talking about a corporation that had to go get government intervention to penalize the imports with a large duty 'only on products that competed with them'...yes.
If you are talking about a corporation, that after it was bailed out was bought back by it's own managers, and started a new era of marketing and selling quality built products.....ehhhhhh...no, not really.
If you are talking about a corporation that made it's largest marketing strategy the selling of clothing items based on nostalgia?
Absolutely no comparison.
Harley types are the biggest sheeple group ever seen.
Sure, the corporation is now successfully. That's great.
But Stude types don't buy in to all the parochial garb, and seek out the 'Look at my clothes' (I look just like everyone else)...
Heck, the Stude type can't even agree on ZDDP, and tire sizes:rolleyes:
All I worry about is clean underwear every day:p
Jeff:cool:



What sets us apart from the me too crowd? "STUDEBAKER" is the simple answer.
Studebakers are like Harley Davidson motorcycles, you either lovum or hatum. <snip>

sweetolbob
11-09-2010, 09:52 AM
Boy, do I disagree with you here..
If you are talking about a once prosperous corporation making bad business decisions...yes.
If you are talking about a company that stayed inside it's own corporate boardroom and did nothing while an import invasion happened with better, and newer products...yes.
If you are talking about a corporation that sold itself off to save itself from annhilation...yes.
If you are talking about a corporation that had to go get government intervention to penalize the imports with a large duty 'only on products that competed with them'...yes.
If you are talking about a corporation, that after it was bailed out was bought back by it's own managers, and started a new era of marketing and selling quality built products.....ehhhhhh...no, not really.
If you are talking about a corporation that made it's largest marketing strategy the selling of clothing items based on nostalgia?
Absolutely no comparison.
Harley types are the biggest sheeple group ever seen.
Sure, the corporation is now successfully. That's great.
But Stude types don't buy in to all the parochial garb, and seek out the 'Look at my clothes' (I look just like everyone else)...
Heck, the Stude type can't even agree on ZDDP, and tire sizes:rolleyes:
All I worry about is clean underwear every day:p
Jeff:cool:

In other words, you are saying we are enthralled with a flawed entity, Kinda like most of us.:)

In fact, before I left the house this AM, my wife pointed out a couple of my flaws so I guess I can identify with being part of a flawed entity.:cool:

I guess I'll renew my membership now that I found out why I identify, in some ways, with this group of ner-do-wells.

And you are correct, my underware is clean, I think.

Bob

Transtar56
11-09-2010, 11:05 AM
"Harley types are the biggest sheeple group ever seen"

Couldnt agree with you less. Have you ever seen two exactly the same Harleys outside a dealers showroom? Me neither

JBOYLE
11-09-2010, 12:11 PM
Harley types are the biggest sheeple group ever seen.


Touchy area, but I basically agree.
Transtar56 is right, while the bikes are different, a lot of the stereotypical Harley guys...are well, stereotypes.
Tatoos...check;
Harley branded leather...check;
beards or droopy mustaches....check (optional on women).

Hey, I didn't go with the croud in high school, I'm sure as heck not gonna start now. I don't need to be part of a "in" group or do stilly stuff (booze, drugs, clothes styles..or a brand of bikes or cars) to fit in.

(S)
11-09-2010, 01:57 PM
I thought you meant Zsa Zsa Gabore or Mr Ed

Flashback
11-09-2010, 08:45 PM
Just judging by what I hear, it seems most of you have never rode Harleys. I wasn't comparing Harleys to Studebakers, except to the fact of dedication to the marque (is dat spelled right?). I didn't have to dress different. It's kinda like some of the Stude people that like the trains wear those funny lookin train caps, but not all of them do. LOL

cultural infidel
11-09-2010, 11:04 PM
Fell in love with the Studes when I was little. Always like that they were a bit different than every other car at shows. They always seemed to have some of the best styling.

Viva La Stude Nation!


on a side note, being the newb that I am, what is Turning Wheels?

clonelark
11-10-2010, 01:12 AM
Turning Wheels is the monthly magazing of the Studebaker Drivers Club, Your not a member? Geeze you could learn so much more about the marque you love. Join the Studebaker Drivers club. I promise you there are a lot more than just pictures.

comatus
11-10-2010, 07:50 AM
Can't believe no one beat me to this one:

Dude. I'm only in it for the chicks.

jclary
11-10-2010, 08:10 AM
Can't believe no one beat me to this one:

Dude. I'm only in it for the chicks.

Chicks huh??
Well...come on by my place...I'll fix you up with some Rhode Island Reds, Buff Orpingtons, Golden Comets, Easter Eggers, etc.!:rolleyes:

3rdGenStude
11-10-2010, 08:33 AM
I could blame it on ancestry. (3rdGenStude gives a nod to my Dad and my Grandpa as Studebaker owners)

I could blame it on that really nice guy at the Lancaster show who GAVE me a wire wheel cover from his '55's trunk when the conversation showed that several of mine had a few missing spokes.

I could blame it on Phil Harris for selling a nice set of repairable '55 front fenders at a REALLY CHEAP price when they didn't get any traction on eBay, or nice guys like Bob Johnstone, Kent Fedor or Chuck Kenney who also sell quality used stuff at fair prices.

Maybe it was the influence of the 1/32 scale Avanti slot car I built and painted Avanti metallic turquoise in 1965.

There's a good chance that "being different" plays into it. Just consider that I'm sending this response from an Amiga computer running the 2010 revision of the Amiga operating system in an era when Windows owns the world. My computer works differently than others, and (I think) does it better. Why should I use something less elegant and more frustrating just because everyone else does? (speaking to the Studebaker matter or the Amiga computer) Sure, I drive other cars for daily transportation (Jeeps) and use Windoze computers at work. But when I want to have fun with a car or computer, it's going to be with something I really like.

But while being different might play a big part in my connection with Studebakers, I think it really comes down to the fact that for any given year of production, the Studebakers were just better looking to me than most other cars of that year.

I guess that makes me shallow. :-)

johnod
11-11-2010, 08:29 AM
While I do tend to be a bit out of the norm in most things, that has nothing to do with my owning a Studebaker.
I just plain had lust when I first saw a 53 coupe in a magazine in the early 70s.
I would put the 53 coupe up againest an early E type Jag, as an example of automotive art/design with no hesitation, both are just plain beautiful.

I just bought an old copy of that mag today on Ebay,I'm looking forward to seeing that old article,and wondering how it holds up after all this time, and how it compares to whats in the garage now.

4961Studebaker
11-11-2010, 09:02 AM
Oh come on! :) .........you mean you don't have a Studebaker logo tatoo like the rest of us???????? ha ha hahah

I favored the less safe t-shirt and jeans approach to riding, but I think the commonality trait that Harley owners and most? Stude owners posses is a spirit of Americana, individuality, and adventurous carefree cruises on back roads.

A tight nit resourcefull group of uncommon individuals maintaining more cohessivness than other car nuts. (SDC#1)

In a sea of commonality.....and the odd ball is mocked......It's nice when the little guy gets the thumbs up.....Thus.....
the little guy wins in the end.





Boy, do I disagree with you here..
If you are talking about a once prosperous corporation making bad business decisions...yes.
If you are talking about a company that stayed inside it's own corporate boardroom and did nothing while an import invasion happened with better, and newer products...yes.
If you are talking about a corporation that sold itself off to save itself from annhilation...yes.
If you are talking about a corporation that had to go get government intervention to penalize the imports with a large duty 'only on products that competed with them'...yes.
If you are talking about a corporation, that after it was bailed out was bought back by it's own managers, and started a new era of marketing and selling quality built products.....ehhhhhh...no, not really.
If you are talking about a corporation that made it's largest marketing strategy the selling of clothing items based on nostalgia?
Absolutely no comparison.
Harley types are the biggest sheeple group ever seen.
Sure, the corporation is now successfully. That's great.
But Stude types don't buy in to all the parochial garb, and seek out the 'Look at my clothes' (I look just like everyone else)...
Heck, the Stude type can't even agree on ZDDP, and tire sizes:rolleyes:
All I worry about is clean underwear every day:p
Jeff:cool:

Johnnywiffer
11-11-2010, 01:38 PM
So what’s wrong with us?

I‘ve written of my fascination, at the age of 11, for the ’47 Studebakers as a group. And documented the 1st time I actually saw AND touched one in a dealer’s showroom. (“1946—The First Time”)

I also detailed the 1st time I actually OWNED one, a ‘48 Champion 5-passenger, when I was married the 1st time. (“Hopping on the Marriage-go-round”) And a ride in my next one—a ’51 Commander Starlight (“100 MPH to Del Rio Behind the Bent-up Wingtips”) And my adventure with my ’54 Commander Starliner (“One Night in KKK”) Even had a before and after set of pix—my wrecked Sky Hawk with the ’57 Silver Hawk parts added.

So everyone who has followed this near-serialization of my life knows my feeling about Studebakers. Then the question becomes, What did I EVER see in Studebakers that kept me coming back for more?

I’ve never stopped to count (and I KNOW it’s not a recored!) but I’m sure I’ve had DOZENS if not SCORES. And probably just as many skinned knuckles and sore knees and brake fluid in my eye and gas in my mouth, from working on them. WHAT THE HECK IS WRONG WITH ME??? Or anyone with the same malady?

As John Clary said, we are CERTAINLY not part of the “Me Too” crowd. (Unless the crowd in which you find yourself is a gaggle of Studebaker freaks!) And look tho I might, I find no tattoos, tho I did have a colonoscopy recently and not sure of later repercussions of that gala time. And unlike Packard V8s conclusion that we do the same thing over and over, expecting a different result, I NEVER repeat the same repair on any car. When I’ve finished one, each car finds a NEW way to chastise and torture me. And Mark (Bullet), different drummer? Maybe. Because the drumming in my ’54 LC sounds different every time I drive it.

SweetolBob said, “…we are enthralled with a flawed entity…” Really? Does that mean we love errors? Nope, I’ve got an eraser on my pencil and I use it. Comatus said, “…in it for the chicks…” Well, I guess you could put a few chickens in one but doesn’t all that dust and feathers get up your nose and tickle? 3rdGenStude says its hereditary. Well, my father did have a ’51 and a ’52 Land Cruiser—but then he got a ’58 Ford. His brain’s timing belt musta jumped a sprocket or so.

Nope, I think it goes back to the title of this thread. The personality of the cars AND the people who own them. Yep. Personalilty. Without it, the cars are just a jumble of parts that might be rusting away in some field. Or might already be shredded. Personality makes THEM and US what we are. Think about it. It was personality (of SOME type) that made you want to marry your better half instead of that ditzy blond with the big…OH? You DID marry the blond? Never mind.

Anyway it’s the PERSONALITY that will keep the cars—and US—coming back for more.

Can you say, "Different by Design"?

John

Bob Bryant
11-11-2010, 02:09 PM
Cars have always been of great interest to me. When we decided to get back into the car hobby my wife made the decision that we wanted an Avanti. She was smart to make that call. When we are at car shows or cruise-ins the car gets an abundance of attention from car fans of all ages. The stories are endless from folks that are reminiscing about the Studebaker(s) in their lives. Some of our car buddies wonder about our enthusiasm for an orphan car. We are not aware of another car choice that could have provided so much fun and interaction with others. The Studebaker owners we know do appear to be somewhat individualistic and it may be reflected in the car choices they have made. Over 13,000 SDC members continue their enthusiasm for the products created by the Studebaker brothers.