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Gallivan
04-18-2007, 08:24 PM
I was cleaning up the back glass while I had it out, and realized there are tiny pits from grinding sparks (luckily I had enough sense to remove the upholstery first, I never thought that sparks would pit the glass).

Anyway, they are very small and the glass is in good shape and clear otherwise- I would like to keep the original glass.

I see that Eastwood has 2 different scratch removal kits for glass. Has anyone tried them? The customer reviews are mixed.

Gallivan
57 Golden Hawk
Golden, CO

jjones
04-18-2007, 08:34 PM
A friend had hard water damage on the glass in his 55 Chebby and tried to use an Eastwood kit. His comment was "a lot of hard work for nuthin!" He took it to a good glass shop where they cleaned and polished all the windows for a couple of hundred bucks. I don't know what they would charge for one window, but it would be worth checking out.

jj

bige
04-18-2007, 08:36 PM
sometimes the cure is worse than the disease. i've seen buffed glass come out wavy like bad body work.

ErnieR

http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r241/AvantiR2/avnatiglamour007.jpg

rockne10
04-18-2007, 10:39 PM
I agree with Jeff. You've got the glass out. Take it to a glass shop, and don't expect perfection.
Fortunately, it's your backlight, not your windshield.

41 Frank
04-18-2007, 10:41 PM
If your fingernail catches on it when you go across the pits or scratches with it forget it ,it won't work, been there done that.

DEEPNHOCK
04-19-2007, 08:26 PM
What have you got to lose?
Take your buffer (with a new pad) and put some Comet kitchen cleanser on the wetted glass. Using some water from the hose...buff it out and see what happens. I'd do it outside, because it is messy...
Jeff[8D]



quote:Originally posted by Gallivan

I was cleaning up the back glass while I had it out, and realized there are tiny pits from grinding sparks (luckily I had enough sense to remove the upholstery first, I never thought that sparks would pit the glass).

Anyway, they are very small and the glass is in good shape and clear otherwise- I would like to keep the original glass.

I see that Eastwood has 2 different scratch removal kits for glass. Has anyone tried them? The customer reviews are mixed.

Gallivan
57 Golden Hawk
Golden, CO

kurtruk
04-19-2007, 11:12 PM
Actually, it would have been better if it were your windshield. Laminated windshield glass is soft and polishes much more easily. But you are removing material, which means visual distortion. Yes, as a general rule, if your fingernail catches the scratch, not much can be done. A professional system can remove deep pits, but again, you will end up with distortion. But those windshields are readily available for replacement. The backglass however...
Tempered glass is very hard. Only a professional system will result in much success against tempered glass. Apparently they have started reproducing this window, but I think in laminated.
In either case, here is the key: During buffing or polishing you must avoid HEAT BUILDUP!!! Localized heat buildup from the friction will result in laminated glass cracking and tempered glass ending up in 80,000 uniform pieces.[:0]

KURTRUK
(read it backwards;))

p.s. We use cerium oxide or "rare earth". AMAZ and similar products sometimes work. Cleanser[?] I doubt it. But always make a slurry and use low RPMs.

55pres
04-19-2007, 11:35 PM
quote:Originally posted by jjones

A friend had hard water damage on the glass in his 55 Chebby and tried to use an Eastwood kit. His comment was "a lot of hard work for nuthin!" He took it to a good glass shop where they cleaned and polished all the windows for a couple of hundred bucks. I don't know what they would charge for one window, but it would be worth checking out.

jj



WOW! Wonder what ppm of CaCO3 he had in his water????

Randy Wakefield
1955 President

jjones
04-20-2007, 07:33 PM
I don't know the concentration of calcium carbonate in the water here, but hard water stains are a common problem since the introduction of Central Arizona Project water. It can affect the paint too. Problem is the water originates in the Colorado River in northwestern Arizona, and is delivered by open canal to southeastern Arizona. Water evaporates, concentrating the minerals. Luckily, I don't drink the stuff.

jj