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MagikDraggin
04-15-2007, 02:38 PM
Ok, got the valve covers off, rigged up a test light, got the feeler gauges set for .026", hand turned the crank to the "IGN" mark on the pulley, checked the settings on cylinder number 1 and found both the intake and exhaust to be jammed down tight with no clearance whatsoever. None!

Checked the rest of the cylinders and they are all set the same way.

What was the PO thinking to have set them all this way and has this caused any particular damage to the valves or valve seats?

Do I now go ahead and adjust them all to .026" or leave them alone?

(This is a cold setting, btw)



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1962 GT Hawk 4sp

GTtim
04-15-2007, 03:03 PM
You need to adjust them so they are set to specs. Just make sure that the engine is in the firing position for the cylinder you are adjusting. It is helpful to have some little white marks on the vibration dampner that mark it in quarters. Take a piece of string, loop it around the dampner and mark the length for the circumfrence. Fold the string in half, then quarters and make a mark. Transfer that length to the dampner starting at the UDC 1 mark, make a white mark, do this two more times and you have it marked in quarters. Every quarter turn, a cylinder fires. Now you just follow the firing order, turning the engine one quarter turn between each adjustment.

It certainly seems odd that there wouldn't be any clearance. If the engine was running well, and if the compression was reasonable, then it could be assumed that you caught it in time before any valves were burned. Get those valves set and see how it runs! Stude engines are tough.

Tim K.
'64 R2 GT Hawk

Dwain G.
04-15-2007, 03:52 PM
When you're on the UDC mark and you find NO clearance in either no. 1 valve, that probably means you are actually on cylinder no. 6 firing position. Check for clearance in those two valves. You can either start there, or turn the crankshaft one full turn to get in no. 1 firing position. After that, you only go 1/4th turn at a time through the firing order on a V8.

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Dwain G.

MagikDraggin
04-15-2007, 05:51 PM
Ok guys, I understand the string thingy. But isn't that doing the same job as the little light I hooked up to the distributor and battery?

Next question......I am a little confused here on the comment that I (might) have been starting off on cylinger #6 instead of cylinder #1. Really, why would that make a difference? Isn't the amount of "lift" on the compression stroke the same as that of the intake and/or exhaust stroke?

That is, if I knew I had the intake valve (or any valve for that matter) on the top of the cam lobe and the piston was at the top of its stroke, couldn't I simply set the valve there?

You'll have to pardon me if that is a stupid question....I'm learning some of this stuff brand new. I've never adjusted solid lifters before.

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1962 GT Hawk 4sp

MagikDraggin
04-15-2007, 06:03 PM
And I got another question while I'm thinking of it. When I did set what I (thought) was #1 piston according to the mark on the timing dampner, I could visually see that both valves were not fully closed while the light was on. It was only right at the precise moment that the light went OUT that both valves were in the fully closed position.

Is that the way it's supposed to work? The manual says to rotate the crankshaft and set the valves as soon as the light comes ON. Sorry, but mine doesn't work that way, and yes I was rotating the crank clockwise as while facing the engine from the front of the car.

What I ended up doing was to (mostly by feel) get one valve in the full closed position....set it to .026, then slightly move the crank until the other valve is in the fully closed position and then adust that one .026.

The actual point of both valves actually being fully closed at the same exact time, must be not much more that a degree or two at the most of rotation.

What do you guys do when you adjust the valves?......get the intake valve in full closed position and then make your adjustment on both valves at the same time, or do you "fine tune" the exhaust valve to ensure that it is indeed fully closed before adjusting it after you have adjusted the intake valve?

Karl

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1962 GT Hawk 4sp

Chucks Stude
04-15-2007, 06:31 PM
Karl,
Picture if you will the "Otto Cycle"... The crankshaft makes two revolutions for each complete cycle. Intake, compression, power, exhaust. It is entirely possible that you tried to adjust the valves on #1 with the crank between the exhaust, and intake portion of the cycle. For the camshaft to be in the proper position to adjust the valves, you need to do it in the TDC, when the sparkplug would normally fire, to get the cam lobes as far away from the lifters as possible.
I have forgotten how a Stude cam is ground, but usually there is a slight overlap of the valves at the exhaust, intake juncture of the "Otto Cycle". This would account for the valves being "tight" when you tried before. Remember, the camshaft is turning 1/2 as fast as the crankshaft. So, yes it is possible that you were on #6 when you thought you were on #1. I speak from experience, from years ago on this, it is easy to get this messed up, if you don't picture the relationship between all of the parts. Remember, also, the distributor only turns 1/2 as fast as the crankshaft. Hope this helps.

Chuck

MagikDraggin
04-15-2007, 07:02 PM
Ok Chuck, I will go back tomorrow and try doing it all over again. But FIRST, just how do I determine when I am actually on TDC of piston #1 and not on #6?

The repair manual says to line up the "IGN" mark on the crankshaft dampener with the pointer, which is what I did. I looked in the empty sparkplug hole and could see that the cylinder was indeed at the top of its stroke.

What else do I need to do?

Karl

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1962 GT Hawk 4sp

N8N
04-15-2007, 07:59 PM
turn it another 180 degrees; TDC at the end of the compression stroke should have both valve closed, but the valves might be slightly open at TDC the end of the exhaust stroke (most cams do have some overlap at that point.)

Pop the distributor cap to confirm; the rotor should be pointing to the #1 terminal on the cap and the pointer should be lined up with the TDC mark on the balancer when you start to adjust #1. then turn the crank 90 degrees for each subsequent cylinder, 1-8-4-3-6-5-7-2. You don't have to do *precisely* 90 degrees, close is good enough. It may not be necessary to do it this way on a Studebaker with a non-R series cam, but this method should work for *any* cam.

good luck

nate

--
55 Commander Starlight
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GTtim
04-15-2007, 08:03 PM
Karl, first off, whenever the engine is set with the timing indicator on IGN or UDC there are two pistons in the top of their respective bores. One of them will be in the firing position and the other (four cylinders away in the firing order) will be at the top of the exhaust stroke with the valves in 'crossover'. You can easily see the crossover by slowly turning the engine. The exhaust valve closes and the intake valve opens. This is not the cylinder you want to adjust the valves on. The other piston at the top is the one in firing position and its valves will not be moving as the engine turns. To identify further when #1 cylinder is firing, when the indicator is on UDC the rotor on the distributor should be pointing towards the front of the engine. The light you have set up has the same function as quarter marks on the damper, but you have to keep turning the ignition on and off or you will burn the points.

Tim K.
'64 R2 GT Hawk

John Kirchhoff
04-15-2007, 10:15 PM
Frankly,whenever I adjust valves on any engine, I turn it over until both valves on one cylinder have opened and closed and then crank it over some more and set them then move onto the next one. I find it's a lot easier than fiddling with all kinds of lights, timing marks and so on. And while that's not how some manuals say to do it, other shop manuals don't give any kind of instruction other than "adjust valves". It's always worked for me without fail.

MagikDraggin
04-15-2007, 10:48 PM
To N8N and GT Jim, That was goooood info! And it was a good spot-on call, that I was 180 off before. Dummie me never thought of pulling the distr cap and seeing which wire the rotor was lined up with.

Anyway, I redid the adjustments and now it works fine...went through it twice as a matter of fact just to check my own work....nice smooth and relatively quiet idle now, where as before it clattered quite a bit.

Now I can say I know how to adjust the lash on solid valve lifters. And I couldn't have done it without all your help. My sincerest thanks to all who chimed in with helpful hints and suggestions.

Thumbs up!

Karl

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v147/MagikDraggin/Other%20Stuff/IM000986-reduced.jpg?
1962 GT Hawk 4sp

Tom B
04-15-2007, 10:52 PM
OK Guys, here's the deal.

Stick your finger in No. 1. Crank the engine bump, bump, bump, until it wants to blow your finger out.

Then rock the timing mark up to top dead center. At this point the intake valve has been closed for one stroke and the exhaust won't open until the piston gets down toward the bottom. Now, set both valves to the correct clearnce.

My manual ('53 232) says .023 to .025 cold.

Never mind splitting between the two valves, the piston is then in the wrong place.

Once No. 1 is set, turn 1/4 turn and do the next, repeat.

Well, I should have typed faster. Glad you got them set.

[img=left]http://www.alink.com/personal/tbredehoft/Bothcars.jpg[/img=left]
Tom Bredehoft
'53 Commander Coupe
'60 Lark VI
'05 Legacy Ltd Wagon
All three Indiana built OD cars

MagikDraggin
04-16-2007, 10:54 AM
quote:Originally posted by Tom B

OK Guys, here's the deal.

Stick your finger in No. 1. Crank the engine bump, bump, bump, until it wants to blow your finger out.

Then rock the timing mark up to top dead center. At this point the intake valve has been closed for one stroke and the exhaust won't open until the piston gets down toward the bottom. Now, set both valves to the correct clearnce.

My manual ('53 232) says .023 to .025 cold.

Never mind splitting between the two valves, the piston is then in the wrong place.

Once No. 1 is set, turn 1/4 turn and do the next, repeat.

Well, I should have typed faster. Glad you got them set.


No problema Tom.....I appreciate your input at well.....this has been quite a learning experience for me. Actually, I was rather amazed that after putting it all back together, that the thing actually started up and ran as well as it did.:D

Karl

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v147/MagikDraggin/Other%20Stuff/IM000986-reduced.jpg?
1962 GT Hawk 4sp

N8N
04-16-2007, 08:45 PM
well I'm glad you figgered it out, I just reread this thread and realized I screwed up in my advice to you... I meant to say to turn it over 360 degrees (180 degrees at the distributor) but it sounds like you got 'er done anyway

nate

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55 Commander Starlight
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