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DEEPNHOCK
03-28-2007, 10:47 AM
Of interest in reading this (and other) forum is all the different advice that is offered. Some of it is excellent, and worthy of bookmarking and saving. Some of it is downright scary. I would like to commend the SDC Turning Wheels Cooperater editor(s) on their commitment to offer good advice. I enjoy reading and learning good tips here and in TW. I won't offer any advice here (or on other forums)unless I know it to be tried,true, and/or safe.

Over the past two weekends, I spent a goodly amount of time fixing a few thing that needed attention. I actually made a checklist, and stuck to the list. The hardest item was going to be that last one..an electrical gremlin. I finally got around to it Sunday afternoon, and never got it finished until late last night.
Here's one thing I found that wasn't on the list, but was found because I was looking close and paying attention.
http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j54/deepnhock/Jeff%20Rice%20Studebaker%20Pictures/WiringFix032007.jpg
I had originally set this circuit up so it could be unplugged for convenience. As you can see from the picture, the spade connector got hot. Heck, all of it within an inch or so of the spade connector got hot. Of course, the whole wire was replaced...without the spade connector in there. The circuit had not failed, nor gave any signs of failure. Just plain old stumbled onto it.
Best to fix that stuff in the driveway, where it is easy..
Jeff[8D]

http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j54/deepnhock/Jeff%20Rice%20Studebaker%20Pictures/1937StudebakerCoupeExpressJeffRicee.jpg

DEEPNHOCK at Gmail.com
Brooklet, Georgia
'37 Coupe Express (never ending project)
'37 Coupe Express Trailer (project)
'61 Hawk (project)
http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock

Dick Steinkamp
03-28-2007, 11:14 AM
Good catch, Jeff...but you're making my butt pucker with that scratchy thing on that beautiful paint [:0]

http://thenobot.org/images/s2d/s2d_01.jpg

studelover
03-28-2007, 03:17 PM
Jeff, would a fuseable link stop that from happening? I have some connections like that on my cars, Some I unplug for the season. My heater swiych is connected to a power source with that kind of male/female deal. When there are more than two electrical devices on at the same time I have smelled what the car was cooking. Do you think that happens because of the gauge of wire we use? Yes that makes me nervious to see that on top of that fine job as well:(

Studebakers forever!

DEEPNHOCK
03-28-2007, 03:36 PM
I just set it on the fender for the pic (because the workbench was trashed[:0])
I don't think a fuseble link would have done anything because this wasn't shorted. It's 14 gauge wire. It was (in my opinion) mismatched brands of butt connectors. I think the contact area between the male and female connector(s) was not enough and it got hot. It never failed, or went 'open'. I never smelled anything either (but probably should have:()
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by Dick Steinkamp

Good catch, Jeff...but you're making my butt pucker with that scratchy thing on that beautiful paint [:0]

[quote]Originally posted by studelover

Jeff, would a fuseable link stop that from happening? I have some connections like that on my cars, Some I unplug for the season. My heater swiych is connected to a power source with that kind of male/female deal. When there are more than two electrical devices on at the same time I have smelled what the car was cooking. Do you think that happens because of the gauge of wire we use? Yes that makes me nervious to see that on top of that fine job as well:(

rockne10
03-28-2007, 09:51 PM
Spade connectors, butt connectors and bullet connectors, like wire, come in different gauges. it's best to make certain everything's matched and the connectors fit tight. The original bullet connectors in my cars were encased within bakelite housings. These connectors work well if precautions are taken.

studeclunker
03-28-2007, 11:16 PM
Scary wire![:0] Scary wire![:0] Please take the scary wire away (shiver, shiver)![:0]

Actually, it looks like the wiring under the dash in my first '64 wagon.[B)] My first purchase from S.I. was a front wiring harness. Didn't even drive the car to the gas station till I had it installed.

http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/december%2006/HPIM0234.jpg http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b18/Studeclunker/56%20Parkview%20Wagon/56wagonleftfrontclipped-1.jpg
Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
Lotsa Larks!
K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
Ron Smith
Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?

65cruiser
03-29-2007, 06:55 AM
Yes, but did you replace the smoke that got out? Once the smoke gets out, it's all over but the shouting.

I remember a guy once on Ebay selling canned smoke so you could put it back into the electrical systems of Lucas equipped British rigs.:D

________________________
Mark Anderson
1965 Cruiser
http://home.alltel.net/anderm

http://home.alltel.net/anderm/images/smstude.jpg

Roscomacaw
03-29-2007, 11:30 AM
Our home AC unit died last summer - right in the middle of the worst of the heat waves we had.[xx(] Worse yet, it was Friday afternoon and what AC techs weren't as burnt out as Jeff's wire were working against a waiting list that was 6 or 7 days long! [xx(]GASP!!!

I'm not an AC-knowledgeable kinda guy, but I decided it couldn't hurt if I took at look into the innards of the fairly new roof-mounted unit. Well looky here! ...... The little circuit board that is the recieving end of the thermostat had an inch wide hole burned RIGHT in the middle! It was a Honeywell piece and about 3 phone calls later, I found one in town. Within two hours of the AC going out, I had it back up for a mere $85 bucks!

Why this story here? - It was a loose blade connector to the middle of that little fibreglass circuit board that generated the heat that eventually made one of the components on the little board short out and turn to toast.:( Sloppy loose connectors and bad crimps will heat up under load. The sparse actual connection tries to carry the load that a GOOD connection could be expected to handle. Consequently, that crappy connectivity is overworked. And who of us hasn't broke down at one time from being overworked???[V]

An excerpt from "Tails of an aircraft electrician":DHope it passes muster.

Miscreant adrift in
the BerStuda Triangle
http://images.andale.com/f2/115/106/906179/2006/12/7/truckonhill3.jpg

1957 Transtar 1/2ton
1960 Larkvertible V8
1958 Provincial wagon
1953 Commander coupe

DEEPNHOCK
03-29-2007, 11:45 AM
Yessir... Good story!
An electrical circuit is like a chain.
The flaw will always show up at the weakest link first.
I have picked up this burned wire at least three different times to try and determine if it were a bad crimp, or the connector itself.
The crimps both look good, and it isn't melted at the plastic collar around the crimp. but it is melted at the cover of the connector by where they slide. The wire covering is melted too, but that just might be from convection of the heat going up the wire.
Beats me.
Never smoked or smelled as far as I know.
Just glad it's fixed.
Jeff[8D]


quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs

<snip>
Why this story here? - It was a loose blade connector to the middle of that little fibreglass circuit board that generated the heat that eventually made one of the components on the little board short out and turn to toast.:( Sloppy loose connectors and bad crimps will heat up under load. The sparse actual connection tries to carry the load that a GOOD connection could be expected to handle. Consequently, that crappy connectivity is overworked. And who of us hasn't broke down at one time from being overworked???[V]
An excerpt from "Tails of an aircraft electrician":DHope it passes muster.

gordr
03-29-2007, 11:57 AM
There's something to be said for ring terminals and screw connectors. Problem with any of the snap connectors is that copper isn't very elastic. Whatever spring tension is initially in the connectors is a result of work-hardening. Let the connector get a little hot, and it anneals, and loses tension. As it loosens, it gets hotter. Positive feedback, leading to the smoke show.

Friend of my has a Triumph Spitfire, with a crappy Luxas alternator. It uses a big spade connector for the main current feed. When (not if) it overheats, you have to replace both the alternator and the plug.

Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

8E45E
03-29-2007, 01:14 PM
[quote]Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK

[navy][b]I just set it on the fender for the pic (because the workbench was trashed[:0])
I don't think a fuseble link would have done anything because this wasn't shorted. It's 14 gauge wire. It was (in my opinion) mismatched brands of butt connectors. I think the contact area between the male and female connector(s) was not enough and it got hot. It never failed, or went 'open'.

Looking at your picture, I'm inclined to think that the hottest point is where the wire was crimped onto the male spade. The plastic insulation covering the actual connection itself isn't burnt to a crisp at all. I know I've often wondered about using non-copper/red brass connectors to electrical components that use a few amps, such as lighting.

Craig

mapman
03-29-2007, 02:12 PM
Yes, I am in favor of maintenance and repair. Preferably in that order. Good catch Jeff!
Rob