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53k
07-20-2006, 08:29 AM
I asked this question on the Studebaker Newsgroup, so if you read both, I apologize for the duplication.
I bought a repop hood insulator to put in my '64 Daytona convert- it had no
pad at all. What do you use to glue it in place? It seems like I remember
getting a tube of weatherstrip adhesive with the last one I bought, but I
didn't install it so I don't know how that works.


Paul Johnson
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine

ROADRACELARK
07-20-2006, 08:46 AM
Paul,
You can buy that same 3M weather strip adhesive in a spray can that works much better than the tube. You get much better even coverage using the spray. Just make sure you mask off everything surrounding the under hood area. Also make several "trial" fits before you apply the adhesive. Once it's stuck, there's no removing or changing its position with out damaging it.:( Hope this helps.
Dan

Road Racers turn left AND right.

DilloCrafter
07-20-2006, 11:44 AM
I learned the hard way recently, that not every spray adhesive made by 3M is suitable for our car situations. I was at Lowe's, and bought a spray can of 3M "Super 77" low misting, spray adhesive, and it was PATHETIC! It would not hold a lightweight (closed cell foam) heat shielding material to the roof of my truck cab - came loose overnight. Also, it was not "low misting" in my opinion, as the whole cab filled with the overspray mist.

I took it back, then went to an auto parts store and got the real stuff - 3M trim and weatherstrip adhesive (I think the part number ends in "90"), which sprays out of a different sort of nozzle, no misting at all, sticks like the great contact cement that it is, and is the ONLY way to go for mounting something overhead, especially anything with some weight to it.

In other words, I agree with what Dan said above. Just be sure to get the trim and weatherstrip adhesive, the one that ends in "90", not even the cheaper one that ends in "88", if this is going overhead, or under hood.

http://rocketdillo.com/studebaker/misc/images/Current_Avacar.gif[/img=left] - DilloCrafter

1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
[i]The Red-Headed Amazon
Deep in the heart of Texas

53k
07-20-2006, 12:48 PM
quote:Originally posted by DilloCrafter

I learned the hard way recently, that not every spray adhesive made by 3M is suitable for our car situations. I was at Lowe's, and bought a spray can of 3M "Super 77" low misting, spray adhesive, and it was PATHETIC! It would not hold a lightweight (closed cell foam) heat shielding material to the roof of my truck cab - came loose overnight. Also, it was not "low misting" in my opinion, as the whole cab filled with the overspray mist.
I took it back, then went to an auto parts store and got the real stuff - 3M trim and weatherstrip adhesive (I think the part number ends in "90"), which sprays out of a different sort of nozzle, no misting at all, sticks like the great contact cement that it is, and is the ONLY way to go for mounting something overhead, especially anything with some weight to it.
In other words, I agree with what Dan said above. Just be sure to get the trim and weatherstrip adhesive, the one that ends in "90", not even the cheaper one that ends in "88", if this is going overhead, or under hood.


Thanks two both of you. Looks like I'll get some of the spray adhesive.

Paul Johnson
'53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
'64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
'64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
Museum R-4 engine